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llice,thc beauliful! lIC>hat a 
vision of loveliness unfolds itself 
as me shive toreflecl something of 
her persoixality! THagnificent, splendid, 
she lowers from a brief and briUianl 
past inlo a glorious future- a future 
rich in prospect, bright in promise. 

l^ere me have worked and played, 
llfere me have raised our ideals.lBere 
me have learned to learn. 

Prospective loAaij.retro5pertive 
tomorrom,this (Hampanile aims to 
add to the record of cherished 
campus ant classroom crperiences 
something of the strength and 
the spiril,the hope and the mill, 
of our gouthful^lmatHater. 



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fo iDrJriffilhdIottraii Evans, 

this (Eampanileis Aeilicateii, 
GTasling Ms lot lutth this university 
in the beginning, he has helii 
steadfast faith inher high destiny, 
which he has striven to make 
securely notable research he 
has brought honor toTHice in 
sher youth, T^is keen insight 
auA pou^erfnl intellect empbyed 
Vigorously in original fielAs of 
thinking haVe u^onrenou^nfor 
himself and haVe inspired others 
to honorable achievement in 
science ^ - ^ 






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EDGAR ODELL LOVETT, Ph. D., LL. D. 

President of I he Rice Iristiiule 



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TO RICE, 

NINETEEN TWENTY-SIX 



fi 



OR four years you have been studying an old 
map. It comes down to you from Athens and 
Sion through Rome. It stretches from the sky 
to the sea through the soul of man. It is the 
map of the western mind. For these same four years you 
have been tracing a new map. It too comes down to you 
by heritage and tradition, and through Rice. It too reaches 
from the sea to the stars through your own spirit. This new 
map IS the map of your own mind. The old records the 
race's acquisitions, and labels its ranges with such terms as 
philosophy and history, science and letters, religion and art. 
The new reveals the individual's adventures, perhaps in 
regions still unlabelled. Each has its vast spaces of undis' 
covered country. Each has its glory either of age or of youth, 
each its lines bright or dark of intellectual beauty, and each 
is gay with all the color of emotional charm. In this place 
you have found no more precious possessions than these 
two maps. Despite their long lineage, they are of your own 
making in so far as you have made them your own. For 
the future they are indispensable to you, both for the busi- 
ness of life and for the leisure of life, but if for either of 
these high ends of living one of the other of these maps 
must at any time be given up, hold fast to the new. And, 
as for each of you this new map of your own mind unfolds, 
I trust that in lines sharp and distinct and in colors radiant 
and strong it may reveal the liberating and liberalising in- 
fluences of philosophy, science, and religion, may register 
substantial contributions on your part to the old map of 
the western mind in its regions both of action and of re- 
flection, and may record for all of us the least mortal part 
of the mind of Rice. 



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OFFICERS OF THE ADMINSTRATION 




EI) (JAR UDKLL I.OVETT 

Pmidait 



ROB K R r G R A X \" I L L E C A L D W E L L 

Dca7i 



SAM EEL GLENN McCANN 

Renslraj- 



JOHN THOMAS McCANTS 

Bursar 



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^ RICE INSTITUTE •- 



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I;': OF l.lBliHAL ANfi 
I , TECHNIOM LEARMNiJ 
I-! FOliNDtP BY 

j ^WILLIAM .MARSH K1C% 

rr. ' AND I 

b|DEJ)ICATE0 BY HIMjIi 
\m> THE ADVANCEMES 
OKIETTERSSCIENCI 

AND ART H 




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The Rice Institute 



Edgar Odell Lovett. 



. President 




THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

James Addison Baker Chairman 

William Marsh Rice, Jr Vice Chairman 

John Thaddeus Scott Vice Chairman 

Benjamin Botts Rick Sccretarx-Treasurer 

Edgar Odell Lovett 
Alexander Sessums Cleveland 
Edward Andrew Peden 



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ADMINISTRATION OFFICES 




iEGIS r RAR 




I'RESIDEN'I 




DEAN' OK MEN 



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Edgar Altenburg, Ph.D. (Colum 
bia), of Elizabeth, New Jersey; for 
merly Assistant in Biology at Co 
lumbiaUniversity instruc- 
tor in Biology at the Rice 
Institute ; Assistant Profes- 
sor of Biology. 

William Orus Andrews, 
B.S. in C.E. (Illinois), of 
Boston, Massachusetts; 
formerly Instructor in Ra- 
tional and Technical Me- 
chanics at Renselaer Poly- 
technic Institute; Instruc- 
tor in Civil Engineering. 

Charles Flinn Arrowood, 
B.A. (Davidson College), 
B.D. (Union Theological 
Seminary), B.A. and M.A. 
Ph.D. (Chicago), of Houston, Texas; 
formerly Fellow in Education at the 
Rice Institute; more recently Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy and Psychology 
at Southwestern Presbyterian Uni- 
versity; Instructor in Education. 

Franklin Durham Ashcraft, B.A. 
(Greenville), of Huntsville, Texas; 






(Rice) 



formerly Director of Physical Edu- 
cation at Sam Houston State Teach- 
ers College; Instructor in Physical 
Education. 

Eugene Stanley Ault, B. 
E. (Johns Hopkins), M.M. 
E. (Cornell), of Ithaca, 
New York; formerly In- 
structor in Machine De- 
sign at Cornell University; 
Instructor in Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Stockton Axson, M.A. 
(Wesleyan),Litt.D. (Pitts- 
burg), L.H.D. (Wesleyan), 
LL.D. (Knox), of Prince- 
ton, New Jersey; formerly 
i.Ei lEKs of the University of Ver- 
mont and of Adelphi College; Pro- 
fessor of English Literature in Prince- 
ton University; Professor of English 
Literature. 

Hubert E. Bray, B.A. (Tufts), M. 
A. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Rice), former- 
ly Instructor in Mathematics at Tufts 
College and at Lafavette Cfillege; 
Fellcjw in Mathematics and later in- 




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structor in Mathematics at the Rice Rice Institute; Professor of American 
Institute; Assistant Professor ot History and Dean of the Institute. 



Mathematics. 

CharlesLowman Browne 
B.S. (Kenyon), B.Arch. 
(Cornell), of Paris, France; 
Instructor in Architectural 
Construction. 

Frederic Browne, Grad- 
uate ot the School ot In- 
dustrial Arts of the Penn- 
sylvania Museum, Phila- 
delphia; student ot the 
Pennsylvania Academy ot 
Fine Arts, Philadelphia; 
five years of study in Paris 
at the Julien Academic, the 
Academic de la Grande 
Chaumiere, and the Academic Colo- 
rossi; illustrator, etcher, and land- 
scape painter; Instructor in Archi- 
tectural Drawing and Painter. 

Andrew Bonnell Bryan, Ph.D. 
(Rice), of Hearne, Texas; Fellow in 
Physics at the Rice Institute; In- 
structor in Physics 






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CIEXCF. 



James Henry Chillman, Jr., M.S. 

in Arch. (Pennsylvania), 

F. A. A. R.,M.A.'l.A.,of 
Philadelphia, Penn; for- 
merly Alumni Fellow in 
Architecture at the Univer- 
sity ot Pennsylvania; In- 
structorin Freehand Draw- 
ing at the University of 
Pennsylvania; Instructor 
in Architecture at the Rice 
Institute; Burnham Fellow 
in Architecture at the A- 
mericanAcademyinRome; 
Assistant Protessor of Ar- 
chitecture. 
Arthur Herbert Copeland, B.A. 
(Amherst), of Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts; formerly Assistant in Mathe- 
matics at Harvard University; In- 
structor in Mathematics. 

Robert R. Crookston, B.S. in M.E. 
(Carnegie Institute of Technology), 
ot Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; formerly 



Robert Granville Caldwell, B.A. with Westinghouse Airbrake Com- 
(Wooster), Ph.D. (Princeton), of pany ot Pittsburg; Instructor in Me- 
Wooster, Ohio; formerly Fellow of chanical Engineering. 
Princeton University; Professor of Erwin Escher, M.A. (Chicago), of 
Economics in the College of Wooster; Jacksonville, Illinois; formerly Pro- 
Assistant Protessor ot History at the lessor ot Romance Languages at Illi- 




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nois College; Instructor in Romance Teutonic Philology in Queen's Uni- 
Languages. versity of Belfast, Ireland, and Ex- 

Griffith Conrad Evans, Ph. D. aminer in the Royal University of 



(Harvard), of Bos ton, 
Massachusetts; formerly 
Instructor in Mathematics 
at Harvard University; 
Sheldon Fellow of Harvard 
University at the Univer- 
sity of Rome; Assistant 
Professor of Pure Mathe- 
matics at the Rice Insti- 
tute. Professor of Pure 
Mathematics. 




TiLUFBJI 



Lester R. Ford, B.A. { __ . 
(Missouri), Ph.D. (Har- ^ _i~___ 
vard), of Cambridge, Mass- 
achusetts; formerly Lee- tabi.k 
turer in Mathematics at the Llniver- 
sity of Edinburg; Sheldon Fellow ot 
Harvard at the LIniversity of Paris; 
Instructor in Mathematics at Har- 
vard University and Instructor in 
Life Insurance in the Graduate School 
of Business Administration of Har- 



Ireland; later Professorial 
Lecturer in Modern Eng- 
lish at the University of 
Marburg, Germany; Pro- 
fessor of German. 

Allen Darnaby Garrison, 
Ph.D. (Rice), of Austin, 
Texas; formerly Fellow in 
Chemistry at the Rice In- 
stitute under appointment 
of the National Research 
Council; Instructor in Phv- 
sical Chemistry. 

Gaston Gille, B.S. (Par- 
lo ART is). Cert. Ped. (Paris), of 

Ithaca, New York; formerly Junior 
Professor at the State Normal School, 
Versailles, France; Instructor in 
French at the summer session of Cor- 
nell University; Instructor in French. 
Philhp Babcock Gove, B.A. (Dart- 
mouth), of Cambridge, Massachu- 



vard University; Assistant Professor setts; Instructor in English. 



of Mathematics. 

Friedrich Ernst Max Freund, Ph.D. 
(Leipsic) formerly Assistant Lecturer 
in the German Language and Liter- 
ature at Liverpool University Col- 
lege; Royal Professor of German and 



Richard P. Hall, B.A. (Henderson- 
Brown), M.A. (California), of Berke- 
ley, California; formerly Instructor 
in Biology at Emory University, and 
Teaching Fellow and Assistant in 
Zooloa;y at the L^niversitv of Califor- 




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nia; Instructor in Biology at Rice. 

Richard Fairfax Ha mill, B.A. 
(Francis Davis-Elkins); Instructor 
in Knglish. 

Arthur}. Hartsook, M.S. 
(Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology), ot Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts; for- 
merly Instructor in Chem- 
istry at the University ot 
Nebraska; Instructor in 
Industrial Chemistry. 

Ray Nelson Haskell, B. 
S. (Chicago), of Chicago, 
Illinois; formerly Instructor in Math- 
ematics at the University of Tennes- 
see and later at Michigan Agricul- 
tural College; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics. 

Claude William Heaps, B.S. 
(Northwestern), Ph.D. (Princeton), 
ot Columbia, Missouri ; formerly Class 
of i860 Experimental Science Fellow 
of Princeton University; Instructor 
in Physics at the University of Mis- 
souri; Instructor in Physics at the 
Rice Institute; Assistant Professor of 
Physics. 

John William Heisman, LF.B. 
(Pennsylvania), of New York City; 
formerly of the Department of Ath- 
letics at Georgia School of Technol- 
ogy, the University of Pennsylvania, 
and Washington and Jefferson Col- 




lege; Director of Athletics at Rice. 
Ernest Wilfred Hjertberg, former- 
ly National Director of Track Ath- 
letics in Sweden; National Director 
of Track Athletics in Hol- 
land; Track Coach of Co- 
lumbia; Track Coach. 

Herbert Kay Humphrey 
B.S. in E.E. ('Illinois), M. 
S. in E.E. (Union), E.E. 
(Illinois), of Schenectady, 
New York; formerly Assis- 
tant Consulting Engineer 
of the General Electric 
Company; Instructor in Electrical 
Engineering at the Rice Institute; 
-Assistant Professor of Electrical En- 
gineering. 

Gaylord Johnson, Ph.D. (Rice), 
formerly Fellow in Organic Chemis- 
try at the Rice Institute; Instructor 
in Chemistry. 

Walter Raymond Kirner, B.S. and 
M.S. (Illinois), Ph.D. (Harvard), of 
Middlebury, Vermont; formerly .As- 
sistant in Organic Chemistry at Har- 
vard University; .Associate Professor 
of Organic Chemistry at Middlebury 
College; Instructor in Organic Chem- 
istry. 

Floyd Seyward Lear, B.A. (Roch- 
ester), M.A. and Ph.D. (Harvard); 
formerly Instructor in History at 
Harvard; Instructor in History. 




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Edgar Odell Lovett, Ph.D. (Vir- 
ginia and Leipsic), LL.D. (Drake, 
Tulane, and Baylor), of Houston, 
Texas; formerly Professor of Math- 
ematics in Princeton Uni- 
versity, and later Head ot 
the Department of Astron- 
omy in the same institu- 
tion; Professor of Mathe- 
matics and President of the 
Rice Institute. 

Samuel Glenn McCann, 
Ph.D. (\Yooster), M.A. 
(Rice), of Dresden, Ohio; 
formerly Fellow in History at the 
Rice Institute; Instructor in Juris- 
prudence and Registrar of the Insti- 
tute. 

John Thomas McCants, M.A. (Vir- 
ginia and Yale), of Houston, Texas; 
formerly Scholar at the University of 
Virginia and University Fellow at 
Yale University; Instructor in Eng- 
lish at the Rice Institute; Instructor 
in Business Administration and Bur- 
sar of the Institute. 

Alan Dogald McKillop, Ph.D. 
(Harvard), ot Cambridge; formerlv 
Instructor in English at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois; Instructor in English 
at the Rice Institute; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English. 

Edward Roy Cecil Miles, B.S. 
(Georgia Inst, of Tech.), M.A. (Har- 




vard); formerly Instructor in Math- 
ematics at the Georgia Institute of 
Technology, United States Naval A- 
cademy, and at Harvard University; 
Ins true tor in Mathematics. 
John Marshall Miller, B. 
S. in E.E. (Kansas State 
Agricultural College), of 
Los Angeles; formerly with 
the Western Electric Com- 
pany, Chicago; later with 
the Southern California 
Edison Company, Los An- 
geles; Instructor in Engi- 
neering Drawing. 

Sebastiano Emanuele Moncada, D. 
Sc. (Genoa), M.A. (Columbia); In- 
structor in Spanish. 

Marcel Moraud, Agrege de I'Uni- 
versite de France, formerly Instruc- 
tor in French at the University of 
Minnesota and at Princeton LTniver- 
sity; later Associate Professor of 
French at the LTniversity of Toronto; 
Professor of French. 

Charles William Morris, Jr., B.S. 
(Northwestern), Ph.D. (Chicago), 
formerly Assistant in Philosophy at 
the LTniversity ot Chicago; Instructor 
in Philosophy. 

Henry O. Nicholas, B.A. (Oberlin), 
Ph.D. (Yale), of New Haven, Con- 
necticut; formerly Fellow and Assist- 
ant in Chemistry at Yale University; 




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later Instructor in Analytical Chem- 
istry at the Rice Institute; Instruc- 
tor in Chemistry. 

pAigene Gene Oberle, M.A. (Stan- 
ford), of Palo Alto, Cali- 
fornia; formerly Instructor 
in Romance Languages at 
the Leland Stanford Junior 
University; Instructor in 
French. 

George Portnof, of New 
York City; formerly In- 
structor in Spanish Litera- 
ture at the Ateneo of Ma- 
drid, later Assistant in Spanish in 
Columbia University; Instructor in 
Spanish. 

Joseph Horace Poimd, B.S. in M. 
E. (Missouri), of Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania; formerly Instructor in the 
School of the Westinghouse Machine 
Company; Instructor in Mechanical 
Engineering at the Rice Institute; 
Assistant Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering. 

Salomon A. Rhodes, Ph.D. (Cor- 
nell), of Ithaca, New York; formerly 
Instructor in French at Cornell Uni- 
versity; Instructor in French and 
Spanish. 

Lewis Babcock Ryon, Jr., C.E. 
(Lehigh), of South Bethlehem, Penn- 
sylvania; Instructor in Civil Engi- 
neering. 




John Willis Slaughter, B.A. (Lom- 
bard), Ph.D. (Murhigan), of New 
York City; formerly Lecturer on So- 
ciology in the School of Economics 
of the L'niversity of Lon- 
don; Lecturer in Civics and 
Philanthropy. 

DeWittTalmageStarnes 
Ph.D. (Chicago), of Aus- 
tin, Texas; formerly In- 
structor in English at the 
Unive^sity of Texas; In- 
structor in English. 
John Clark Tidden, of 
Philadelphia; formerly Fellow and 
Traveling Scholar of the Pennsylva- 
nia Academy of Fine Arts; Instruc- 
tor in Architectural Drawing and 
Painting. 

Radoslav Andrea Tsanoff, B.A. 
(OberHn), Ph.D. (Cornell), of Wor- 
cester, Massachusetts; formerly Sage 
Fellowof Cornell University; Instruc- 
tor in Philosophy at Clark Univer- 
sity; Assistant Professor of Philos- 
ophy at the Rice Institute; Professor 
of Philosophy. 

Patrick Henry Underwood, M.A. 
(Rice), of Schenectady, New York; 
formerly with the General Electric 
Company, Schenectady; Instructor 
in Engineering. 

Howell Hubert Vines, B.A. (Ala- 
bama), M.A. (Harvard); Instructor 




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in English. 

CurtisHoweWalker, Ph.D. (Yale), 
of Chicago; formerly Assistant Pro- 
fessor of History at the University 
of Chicago; Lecturer in 
European History. 

Clark Warburton, B.A. 
(Cornell), of New York 
City; formerly Assistant 
Research Statistician, Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank ; Instruc- 
tor in Economics at Ewing 
College, and Reader in Ec- 
onomics at the University 
ot Allahabad, India, and editor-in- 
chief of the Indian Journal of Eco- 
nomics, more recently. Research As- 
sistant with the Standard Statistics 
Company of New York and graduate 
student at Columbia University; In- 
structor in Economics. 

James Stephen Waters, Jr., B.S. 
(Rice), of Galveston; Instructor in 
Engineering. 

William Ward Watkin, B.S. in 
Architecture (Pennsylvania), M.A.I. 
A., of Houston; formerly Scholar in 
Architecture in the University of 
Pennsylvania; Associate Architect 
with Messrs. Cran and Ferguson, the 
Supervising Architects of Rice Insti- 
tute; Instructor in Architecture at 
Rice Institute; later Assistant Pro- 
fessor ot Architecture at Rice Insti- 




M E X D E L E E F F 



F.R.S., 



tute; Professor of Architecture. 

Harry Boyer Weiser, M.A. (Ohio 
State), Ph.D. (Cornell), of Memphis; 
formerly Assistant Instructor in 
Chemistry at Cornell Uni- 
versity; Assistant Profes- 
1 "^ sor of Chemistry in the 
K >} 1^' Universitv of Tennessee; 
■ ^ Instructor m Chemistry at 
- Rice Institute; later Assist- 
ant Professor of Chemistry 
at Rice Institute; Profes- 
sor of Chemistry. 

Harold Albert Wilson, 
M.A. (Cambridge), M.Sc. 
(Victoria), D.Sc. (London), formerly 
1 85 1 Exhibition Scholar of Leeds 
University; Allen Scholar and Clark 
Maxwell Student of Cambridge Uni- 
versity; Scholar in Physics of London 
University; Fellow of Trinity Col- 
lege, Cambridge LTniversity; Profes- 
sor of Physics in King's College, 
London; Professor of Physics in Mc- 
Gill University; Professor of Physics 
at the Rice Institute; later Professor 
of Natural Philosophy at the LTniver- 
sity of Glasgow; Professor of Physics. 

''''^Rather,' said Democritus, ''vsoiild 
I discover the cause of one fact than 
become King of the Persians'." 




nrketg''^i^ C^:^s^1l^ av1gt^t^ 



FELLOWS AND ASSISTANTS 

F. Joe Bedenk, All American Foot- College), of Parkville, Missouri; for- 



ball Team 19-j; Assistant Director 
of Rice Athletics; Assistant Football 
Coach; Head Baseball Coach. 
Geoffrey Everett Cunning- 
ham, B'.S. and M.S. (Tu- 
lane), formerly Instructor 
in Chemistry in Tulane 
University; Fellow in 
Chemistry. 

Alice Crowell Dean, M. 
A. ( R i c e ) , o t H o u s t o n , 
Texas; Fellow in Mathe- 
matics. 



merly Assistant in Physics at Park 
College; Fellow in Physics. 

Rudolph Stokes Nelson, B.S. and 

M.S. (Illinois), formerly 

Austin Teaching Fellow at 

^♦' Harvard University; Pro- 

^ I ^ p- tessorof Chemistry at Ten- 

•sT iJ' ,' Nj, nessee College; Fellow in 

_ '^^t\'*^~' Chenristry. 

k- ^. William Nottingham 

\%^ g^ Powell, B.A. (Rice), Grad- 

deTessep^ uate Assistant in Biology. 

Robert Stanley R ad- 




Nat Edmonson, M.A. (Austin Col- cliffe, B.S. (Lafayette), formerly As- 
lege), of Sherman, Texas; formerly sistant in Chemistry at Middlebury 
Assistant in Mathematics at Austin College; Acting Professor of Chem- 



College; Fellow in Mathematics. 

Sam S. Emison, B.S. (Rice); Grad- 
uate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Julius Lyman Edward Erickson, 
B.A. (Rice); Graduate Assistant in 
Chemistry. 

.Augusto Fyquem, Bachelor of Hu- 
manities (Chile), of New York City; 
formerly Assistant in Spanish at 
Princeton L'niversity; Assistant in 
Spanish. 

Joseph Stephens Gallegly, Jr., of 
San Antonio; Assistant in English. 

Joseph Calvin Henderson, B.A. 
(Rice); Fellow in Biology. 

Gordon Lee Locher, B.A. (Park 



istry at Maryville College; Fellow in 
Chemistry. 

Charles Frederick Roos, B.A. and 
M.A. (Rice), of Houston, Texas; Fel- 
low in Mathematics. 

Isaac Christopher Sanders, B.A. 
(Rice), of Bryan, Texas; formerly 
Assistant Professor of Physics at the 
Agricultural and Mechanical College 
of Texas; Fellow in Physics. 

AllanHenry Stevenson, B.A. (Rice), 
of Alvin, Texas; Assistant in English. 

James Silas Watt, B.A. and M.A. 
(Rice), El Campo; Fellow in Physics. 

GeorgeGuion Williams, B.A. (Rice), 
Bellaire, Texas; Assistant in English. 




cr-^^ J^iei$^ "^t^^i^i^bt^s^fee ^^^^^ 



FACULTY CHANGES 



The year 1926 has seen several 
changes in the faculty, by some ot 
which we have gained, but by others 
of which we have been decidedly the 
loser. 

Stockton Axson, Profes- 
sor of English Literature, 
returned this fall, after an 
absence. He came to Rice 
in 1913, the year after it 
opened, andduringhis years 
here has made himself one 
of the most notable fig- 
ures, and most beloved pro- 
fessors in the Rice Institute faculty, ture, gave a three months lecture 

A number of campus activities have course in English Literature, and one 
felt the loss of John Clark Tidden, in French Literature. He was here 
Instructor in Architectural Drawing only during the fall term, returning 
and Painting, who left for New York, to the LIniversity of Paris for the 
where he will open a studio. He has winter term. He is the author of re- 
especially left a void in the Dramatic markable studies on the social aspects 
Club, with which he has for several of English Literature, especially nov- 
years been connected as a director. els of the middle of the 19th century. 




Two new professors. Max Freund, 
Professor of German, and Marcel 
Moraud, Professor of French, have 
been added to the faculty list. The 
former has behind him a 
brilliant record as a Pro- 
fessor of German and Eng- 
lish language and literature 
in several L'niversities of 
England, Ireland, and Ger- 
many. 

Louis Cazamian, one of 
the greatest of Continental 
students of English Litera- 



John Willis Slaughter, Lecturer in 
Civics and Philanthropy, left during 
the last term for the University of 
Central China, where he will lecture 
on Sociology and Social Work. He 
is not entirely lost, however, for he 
will return to the Institute next Fall. 

The return of Harold Albert Wil- 
son, Professor of Physics, after a 
year's absence, is fortunate for Rice. 



EXTENSION LECTURES 

The LIniversity Extension Lectures 
are becoming an important link be- 
tween the people of Houston and the 
Rice Institute. They afford an oppor- 
tunity for those people who cannot 
attend classes to hear, once a week, a 
lecture by professorsof the Institute 
on subjects of varied interest. 




nribte USr^r^~lgr^7^3.its>.a^iaCt^ 




" Yonr old men have dreamed this dreatn 

and your young men have seen this vision. 
The age of romance has not gone, it is only 

beginning; 
Greater words than the ear of man has heard are 

waiting to be spoken. 
Finer arts than the eyes of man have seen are 

sleeping to be awakened — 
Science exploring the scope of the world. 
Poetry breathing the hope of the world. 
Music 10 measure and lead the onward march 

of men! 
Come, ye honored and welcome guests from the 

elder nations. 
Princes of science and arts and letters. 
Look on the walls that embody the generous dream 

of one of the old men of Texas, 



Enter these halls of learning that rise in the land 

of the pioneer's log-cabin. 
Read the confessions of faith that are carved on 

the stones around you: 
Faith in the worth of the smallest fad and the 

laws that govern the starbeams — 
Faith in the beauty of truth and the truth of 

perfect beauty. 
Faith in the God who creates the souls of men by 

knowledge and love and worship. 
This is the faith of the New Democracy — 
Proud and humble, p-itiently pressing forw^ird. 
Praising her heroes of old and training her future 

leaders. 
Seeking her crown in a nobler race of men and 

women — 
.Ifler the pioneers, sweetness and light!" 

— Henrv \':in Dvke. 



Wh^rt tWZW~^^^!^1^'^^iXW 




CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

BACHELOR OF SCIENTE IN ARCHITECTLRE 

Edward Bowers Arraxts Dallas, Texas 

Bachelor of .-/ris (The Rice Institute) 
Clare.nxe Alfred Johxsox El Campo, Texas 

Bachelor of .-Irts (The Rice Institute) 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Julius Lvmax Edward Erickson Lake Charles, Louisiana 

Bachelor of .iris (The Rice Institute) 

Joseph Stephex Galleglv, Jr San Antonio, Texas 

Bachelor of .iris (The Rice Institute) 

GoRDOX Lee Locher Parkville, Missouri 

Bachelor of . iris (Park College) 

Fraxk Willls Pluxkett Houston, Texas 

Bachelor of Science (The L'niversitv ot Aiissouri) 
Bachelor of .-/rls (The Lniversitv ot Missouri) 

Allax Hexrv Ste\"exsox Ah'in, Texas 

Bachelor of . iris (The Rice Institute) 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Charles Frederick Roos Houston, Texas 

Bachelor of .iris (The Rice Institute) 
Master of .iris (The Rice Institute) 

James Si las Watt El Campo, Texas 

Bachelor of Arts (The Rice Institute) 
Master of Arts (The Rice Institute) 

APPROVED CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

DoxAi.D X'lXEs Hexdersox Onalaska, Texas 

Bachelor of .iris (The Rice Institute) 
Cov Walter Mills Houston, Texas 

Bachelor of .iris (The Rice Institute) 



cT'^^^ ^iei^ '^1s:^^t?i)i^i)^fee "^^i^ 




GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Janet Garner Allen Houston, Texas 

Edward Bowers Arrants Dallas, Texas 

Gloria Norvell Bryan Houston, Texas 

James Ira Campbell Houston, Texas 

Geoffrey Everett Cunningham Little Rock, Arkansas 

James Bradshaw Earthman Houston, Texas 

Nat Edmondson, Jr Sherman, Texas 

Sam S. Emison Houston, Texas 

Julius Lyman Edward Erickson Lake Charles, Louisiana 

Charles Lee Hairston Bartlett, Texas 

Mary Louise Hamburger Houston, Texas 

Ray Nelson Haskell Elwood, Indiana 

Ethel Lyon Heard Houston, Texas 

Donald Vines Henderson Onalaska, Texas 

Joseph Calvin Henderson Onalaska, Texas 

Clarence Alfred Johnson El Campo, Texas 

Harriet Maxwell Keeling Houston, Texas 

Theodore Felix Keller Houston, Texas 

Juanita Harper Kirner Houston, Texas 

Edward Arnim Lane Houston, Texas 

Julius Herman Larson Delvalle, Texas 

Gordon Lee Locher Parkville, Missouri 

Joe Wright Miller Sherman, Texas 

Coy Walter Mills Houston, Texas 

Thomas Verner Moore La Porte, Texas 

Mildred Louise Morris Houston, Texas 

Rudolph Stok.es Nelson Rockford, Illinois 

Mrs. J. S. Newton Houston, Texas 

Julia Pleasants Houston, Texas 

Frank Willis Plunkett Houston, Texas 

William Nottingham Powell Smithville, Texas 

Robert Stanley Radcliffe Doylestown, Pennsylvania 

Mary Mae Barkuloo Roos Houston, Texas 

Isaac C. Sanders Houston, Texas 

Allan Henry Stevenson Alvin, Texas 

K.\therine Elizabeth Wood Houston, Texas 



Tih-e ^ Si 'r ^~lg!:^:^HP ■gi.iaCt^ 




SCHOLARSHIPS, I925''26 

The Graham Baker Student 

Deborah Mav Hicke\', Class of 1926, of Houston, Texas. 



The Hoheiithal Seholars 

James Robert Ayers, Class ot 1926, of Yoakum, Texas. 
Franklyn Kenneth Da\ts, Class of 1926, ot Houston, Texas. 
Maurice William Ewing, Class ot 1926, of Locknev, Texas. 
Jack Carnohan Griffin, Class ot 1926, ot Dallas, Texas. 
Mira Donna May, Class ot 1926, of Galveston, Texas. 
Harvin Cooper Moore, Class ot 1927, of Houston, Texas. 

The Sharp Scholars hi Civics and Philanthropx 

Ruth Marjorie Bobb, Class of 1926, ot Houston, Texas. 
Donald Vines Henderson, Class of 1925, of Onalaska, Texas. 
Ethel Farrington McConnell, Class ot 1926, ot Athens, Alabama. 
CoY Walter Mills, Class of 1925, of Houston, Texas. 
Eva Temple Prather, Class of 1926, of Texarkana, Texas. 
Irene Plnkin Simpson, Class ot 1926, ot Houston, Texas. 

Scholar of the John McKiiilt .llexaiidcr Chapter, I)a/{ghters of the Jiucrica)i Kevolnlion 
Fannv Bess Emery, Class ot 1926, (jt Houston, Texas. 

The Ellen Jxson Wilson Scholarship 

Edith FIvelvn McKean, Class of 1927, of Mykawa, Texas. 



cr^^ JSrji^i^^ ""Cw^ ibufen^j^fce ^^^^^ 




SCHOLARSHIP LIST, 1 924- 25 



JUNIOR SCHOLARSHIP LIST 



James R. Avers 
Jean L. Bvers 
William F. Ellis 
Maurice W. Ewing 
Jack C. Griffin 
Edward C. Helmle 



Fred Fox Benton 
Ernest E. Blondeau 
Mary E. Bulbrook 
Bertie M. Chambers 
Margaret Cooper 
Franklyn Davis 
Richard H. Earl 
Thomas E. Ellis 
Geraldine Fitzgerald 
Louis E. Garfield 
DeWitt H. Grossman 



Scholars with Special Mention 

Deborah M. Hickey Joe G. Pasternack 

Fred G. Hollins 

Thomas J. Johnson 

Virginia L. McConnell 

Mira Donna May 



Walter F. Qualtrough 
Thomas Clay Spencer 
Flora McIver Streetman 
Dorothy E. West 



Jacob W. Metzler 

Scholars 
Beatrice Harrison 
Lenora Hawkins 
Joseph G. Heyck 
Ruth M. Hickey 
Marjorie Ilfrey 
James K. Jones 
Walter Joseph 
Charles W. Lane 
Ethel McConnell 
Helen McCullough 
Meredith McDougal 



Dorothy J. Metzler 
Mary E. Northrup 
Esther Oberholtzer 
Freda Radoff 
George Holmes Richter 
Dorothy E. Seaman 
Irene P. Simpson 
Fleda Ray Smith 
Emory M. Spencer 



SOPHOMORE SCHOLARSHIP LIST 



William F. Black 
William Copeland 
Mildred K. Fulton 
Claude T. Fuq.ua, Jr. 

LovETT Abercrombie 
Victor B. Andrew 
Alberta Baines 
Eugene H. Banta 



Scholars with Special Mention 
Susie Jackson Harvin C. Moore 

Mildred M. Kelly Kristine Mortenson 

Herbert McConnell Rosa H. Pomerantz 

Edith E. McKean Hortense S. Pye 



Scholars 
Philip E. Barber 
Harold Barr 
Maurine M. Bates 
Benjamin E. Brewer 



Myrtle Inez Cocke 
Annie Mae Coffman 
Lacoste Ellis 
Mary Louise Embry 



nrke t ^ g;g::c^m-its> a^^it^ 




SCHOLARSHIP LIST, 1924- 25 



SOPHOMORE SCHOLARSHIP LIS T— (Continued) 



Florence E\ er.sber(; 
Ronald Garrison 
Frank W. Godsev, Jr. 
Clara Harbeck. 
Brl'^n Holden 
Pearl Hooker 
Emilv Hutson 
Theodore Jahn 
Virginia L. Kinard 



Scholars 
John T. NLacinnis 
Eleanor Miller 
Virginia Morgan 
Richard R. Morris 
Henry Oliver 
Marv a. Powers 
Philip \V. Reinhart 
Gene Rhodes 
Julian L. Shapiro 



ZiE Belle Shaw 
William G. Smiley 
Will Rivers Smith 
George Titterington 
Alice Adele Tryon 
Robert C. Wallis 
Irene Alice Ward 
Rachel WHITELK^• 
Emile Zax 



FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIP LIST 



Robert Ashworth 
Elizabeth Badger 
Edwin Beckenbach 
William Bridgewater 
Frank Dawson 
LuRA Duff 



I'RANK T. Allen 
Donald Barthelme 
Ruth Blackwell 
Lynn Bourdon 
Helen Clarke 
Benjamin Chitwood 
Arthur Denman 
Ed Barreit Dukkie 
Milton Echert 
William H. Farmer 
Evelyn Gammon 
Marion Hubbei.l 
Mary J. Inkley 



Scholars icilh Special Men I ion 
Lloyd Friedman 
Maude I. Hickey 
Leola Kreiter 
Ethel E. Place 
Fin LEY Robidoux 
William Rust 

Scholars 
Dora Emma Lselt 
William Jenkins 
William Killebrew 
J. Roderick Kitchei.l 
Bessie Lieberman 
Milton Liljestrand 
Vernon L. McKinney 
Elsie McMahan 
Leigh Masterson 
Dora Lee Montgomery 
Ruers a. Patout 
Til lie Pomerantz 
Egerton Robb 



Frances Suessmuth 
James M. Whiteley 
Nola Mae Williams 
Margaret Woodward 



Inga Mae Schuppan 
Della Shapiro 
I-'rances May Smith 
Joseph H. Tabony 
JosiAH Taylor, Jr. 
Henry C. Tooley 
Christine A. Vocrr 
Eugene G. Westheimer 
Kathryn Wilson 
George J. Winston 
Ella Frances Woodruff 
F.sther Zusman 



=? 





Adki-e Roen'sch 

; Can.liaare tor 15. A. Dtttrt-c; 

I ,(;irrsTcmusCl.ili, 'ii-'ih- 
f 'kicf YAV.C.A., -ii^'ii-.- 

"YAV.C.A. I'lu), iC; yc! 

1 l.es H.boux, •:!;, 

Chairnian ui l'n.^r:ims, 
, V/ice I'rL'siilcUT, "■;'-i; 
f-.Ricx- Di-.-nn-itK- CUih, -2 
f/SL-crxt.irv-TRMMirer, 'ih 
rOA^/I.AKrt*iUwU ■" 



^dWARD Bl'RN'S RoF.5}SC? 
Hi)USli}n, Tt'xiis 
taAduhire f...r H.A. Deyree 
International (Jroui-, 'Zn-':'i; 
I'resiiimit First Hajnist Kice 



James A. Russri.i., Jr\\ 

/ Brovns-jtlle, Texas 

Camlidate for B.A. Dei,Tee;\ 
PrL'sident Spanish Cluh, '?6;\ 
Presuk-nt Class, '2); , . \fe 

ChalriiKm I'uial Hal' ' ^^ - 
■' ComniittL-L'. 




„ ,„„— J 




^Tn^:^ing^^r^~i^rai-is^1ts) tevwCt^ 





$c|iliomoi«e$ 




SOPHOMORE 
CLASS OFFICERS 

F.DWARD HeRI'ING 

President (First Term) 



Jack Ogg 

President (Second Term) 



Matilda Hood 
I 'ice President 



Rudolph Allen 
Secretiirv 



Roderick Kitchell 
Treasurer 



DANCE 
COMMITTEES 

General Chairman 
Gordon Turrentine 

Associates 
Matilda Hood 
Ralph Nevinger 

Finance 

Roderick Kitchell 

John R. Saint 

Refreshments 
Margie Thiel 



Vi.oNzo TooKER W. Abrahams 
Houston, Texas 

Keelin'g Henrv Adams 
Houston, Texas 

Herbert Allen 
Lufkin, Texas 

Benjamin Hogan Allen 
Houston, Texas 

Vaughn Shaffer Albertson 
Dallas, Texas 

KuDoLi'H Weldon Allen 
Athens, Texas 

Baker White Armstrong 
Houston, Texas 

George Arnold, Jr. 
Sulphur Springs, Texas 

IsADORE AvNET 

Houston, Texas 

Elizabeth Miriam Badger 
Houston, Texas 

John Kain Baehr 
Houston, Texas 

Margaret Elizabeth Bailey 
Houston, Texas 

Dorothy Ruth Barnes 
Houston, Texas 

Roy Trimble Barnes 
Fort Worth, Texas 

Tom William Barr 
Dallas, Texas 

Donald Barthelme 
Galveston, Texas 

Mary Alice Beazley 
Houston, Texas 





Edwin Ford Becrenbach 
Dallas, Texa^ 

Walter G. Bell 
Edmond, Oklahoma 

Felicia Bemus 
Houston, Texas 

Florence Catherine Bering 
Houston, Texas 

J. T. BiLLUPS, Jr. 
Winters, Texas 

Lucy Agatha Binyon 
Houston, Texas 

Ruth Van Pelt Black.well 
La Porte, Texas 

Janet Blair 
Clarksville, Texas 

Leslie Boelsche 
Industry, Texas 

Walter Goodrich Boone 

Navasota, Texas 

Lynn Louis Bourdon 
Houston, Texas 

George Robert Boynton 
Bellville, Texas 

William Richard Bridgewater 
Houston, Texas 

David Todd Briggs 
Houston, Texas 

Lloyd Joseph Broussard 
Lafayette, Louisiana 

Madolyn Cartier Bryan 
Houston, Texas 

Charles Michael Buhler, Jr. 
Victoria, Texas 



Alice Katherine Burns 
Freeport, Texas 

Charles Richard Bush 
El Paso, Texas 

Anne Claire Byrne 
Houston, Texas 

Adrian Bennett Cairns 
Houston, Texas 

Clarence Wesley Canterberry 
Longview, Texas 

Edgar Houston Carll 
Belton, Texas 

John Hogan Clark 
Houston, Texas 

Helen Cartland Clarke 
Houston, Texas 

Mildred Elizabeth Cole 
Houston, Texas 

Clara Frances Cook 
Houston, Texas 

Marvin Ancel Crenshaw 
Genoa, Texas 

Thomas Dillon Cronin 
Houston, Texas 

Nell Ethel Curry 
Breckenridge, Texas 

Thelma Mae Curry 
Breckenridge, Texas 

Thomas Ellis Daley 
Houston, Texas 

Thomas Francis Davies 
Granite City, Illinois 

Frank Matthews Dawson 
Houston, Texas 





Frank Warner DeLange 
Sherman, Texas 

Arthi'r Bryan Denman 
Houston, Texas 

Krwin Rudolph Discher 
Shiner, Texas 

LuRA Hannah Duff 
Houston, Texas 

Ed Barrett Duffie 
Hull, Texas 

Kdmund Buchwalter Dugcan 
Belton, Texas 

Hazei.i.e Vinita Duni.ap 
Houston, Texas 

Aj.an Dunning 
Mexico City, Mexico 

Mu.TON KlRSCH EcKERT 

Houston, Texas 

Evelyn Jane Eplev 
Houston, Texas 

OiTs Rose Imscher 
Houston, Texas 

Ernest Howard Folk 
Houston, Texas 

Mary Catherine Fondren 
Houston, Texas 

I.i.oYD Ki.iNG Friedman 
Beaumont, 'I'exas 

Oscar Elbridge (Jammill, Jr. 
Shreveport, Louisiana 

Marguerite Marie L. Gehret 
Galveston, Texas 

Mary Armistead Gohi.man 
Houston, Texas 



Alice Elizabeth Golden 
Houston, Texas 

Frank. Hale Goodrich 
Brownsville, Texas 

Richard Stephen Grant 
Pascagoula, Mississippi 

Ola Mae Green 
Houston, Texas 

Margaret Jennie Haggart 
Houston, Texas 

Walter Gardner Hall 
League City, Texas 

Charles Whiteley Hamilton 
Houston, Texas 

William Tarrant Hancock, Jr. 
Houston, Texas 

Mervin Glenmore Hansbro 
Houston, Texas 

Sidney Baron Hardy 
Galveston, Texas 

Edward William Herting, Jr. 
Hartford, Connecticut 

Stella Cora Herzik 
Houston, Texas 

Ernest Pleasanton Hickey 
Houston, Texas 

Maude Isabel Hickey 
Houston, Texas 

AvARiLLA Grace Hildenbrand 
Houston, Texas 

Lloyd Lester Hill 
Slaton, Texas 

Joseph Winston Hillsman 
Houston, Texas 





Bernice Ellen Hillyer 
Houston, Texas 

Percv Rosson Holt 
Kilgore, Texas 

Matilda Dale Hood 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Dora Alice Howard 
Houston, Texas 

Bert Paul Howerton 
Corpus Christi, Texas 

Marion Hubbell 
Houston, Texas 

P'.DWARD Howell Hughes 
Sherman, Texas 

Marv Josephine Inklev 
Houston, Texas 

Dora Emma Iselt 
Houston, Texas 

Thomas Perrv Jackson 
Houston, Texas 

Edith Moore James 
Houston, Texas 

William Fountain Jenkins 
Houston, Texas 

Mary Virginia Jett 
Houston, Texas 

Leola Jewell Jinks 
Houston, Texas 

William Burian Killebrew, Jr. 
Anahuac, Texas 

Ruth Josephine King 
Houston, Texas 

James Roderick Kilchei.]. 
Galveston, Texas 



Alwyn Sterling Koehler 
Houston, Texas 

Leola Jeanette Kreiter 
Houston, Texas 

Anna Rebecca Lav 
Denison, Texas 

Jessamine Margaret Lewis 
Houston, Texas 

Milton Oliver Lii.jestrand 
Weslaco, Texas 

Russell Livergood 
Houston, Texas 

Robert Foster Loughridce 
Waco, Texas 

Marv McAshan 
Houston, Texas 

CuNTON Irvin McGlothlin 
Fort Worth, Texas 

Karmon Lorane McHenrv 
Greenville, Texas 

Pauline Dale McIntvre 
Houston, Texas 

Ruth Esther McLain 
Missouri City, Texas 

Salvador Joseph Madero 
Parras, Coahuila, Mexico 

Fred Mahaffev, Jr. 
Houston, Texas 

Jach Albert Major 
Paducah, Kentucky 

Charles Wellington Mann 
Longview, Texas 

William Henry Means 
Houston, Texas 





Bessie Meltok 
Houston, Texas 

Arthur Roger MeVer 
Texas City, Texas 

Charles Arthur Miller 
Kempner, Texas 

Dora I.ee Montgomery 
Houston, Texas 

Betty Moody 
Houston, Texas 

Isabel Morris 
Houston, Texas 

Thurmond Murphy 
Longview, Texas 

(Iale F.rwin Nevill 
Houston, Texas 

Marie Alma Nordmeyer 
McAUen, Texas 

Jack McDonald Ogc 
Houston, Texas 

James Harry Painter, Jr. 
Houston, Texas 

I.OLA Annetie Parker 
Harrisbutg, Texas 

Mary Jane Parker 
San Angelo, Texas 

Robert Upshaw Parrott 
Smithville, Texas 

Rivers Aristide Patout 
Navasota, Texas 

Iohnnie Brock Pevateaux 
Houston, Texas 

F.iHEi. Elizabeth Place 
Houston, Texas 



Ruth Polk 
Houston, Texas 

TiLLIE POMERANTZ 

Houston, Texas 

Jake Sam Radoff 
Houston, Texas 

Amne Elizabeth Reynolds 
Houston, Texas 

Will Scott Richier 
Dallas, Texas 

Clyde Thomas Rienhardt 
Houston, Texas 

Vivian P. Ringer 
Corsicana, Texas 

Mn.[.ER Craig Robertson 
Houston, Texas 

Joe Emory Rogers 
Fort Worth, Texas 

Louise Nell Rogers 
Houston, Texas 

Marian Rogers 
Houston, Texas 

Milton Edison Roos 
Houston, Texas 

Ellen Burnett Ross 
Houston, Texas 

James Anderson Ruth 
Houston, Texas 

Marvel May Sandel 
Houston, Texas 

William Joe Savage 
Forrest Hill, Louisiana 

John Kennis Schaefer 
Houston, Texas 





Inga Mae Schuppan 
Houston, Texas 

GusTAVE Carl Schwedler 
Dallas, Texas 

Clvde Charles Scott 
Sherman, Texas 

Bernard Isaac Segal 
San Antonio, Texas 

B. M. Seward 
Knippa, Texas 

Della Shapiro 
Houston, Texas 

Edwin Pliny Shaw 
Houston, Texas 

Henry Clay Sherrod 
Galveston, Texas 

Marie Elizabeth Sherwood 
Houston, Texas 

Frances May Smith 
Houston, Texas 

LuciLE Melville Smith 
Houston, Texas 

Marian Isabelle Spencer 
Houston, Texas 

Roy Dodd Spencer 
Houston, Texas 

Theodore Francis Siack 
Ludington, Louisiana 

Mary Lynn Stevenson 
Houston, Texas 

Janet Thelma Stewart 
Houston, Texas 

Walter Douglas Stine 
Beaumont, Texas 



Irene Mildred Stowe 
Houston, Texas 

Selma Odessa Strange 
Houston, Texas 

Marv Virginia Street 
Houston, Texas 

James Bernard Stringer 
Mount Vernon, Texas 

Frances Johanna Suessmuth 
Houston, Texas 

Annie Lucile Taggart 
Houston, Texas 

Dorothy Jane Taylor 
Houston, Texas 

Margie Wilma Thiel 
Houston, Texas 

John Clifford Tolle 
San Antonio, Texas 

Fred Lott Trube 
Galveston, Texas 

Nancy McWillie Tucker 
Houston, Texas 

Gordon Henry Turrentine 
Houston, Texas 

Christine Alphonse Vogt 
Victoria, Texas 

Mary Walker 
Tahoka, Texas 

Sarah Elizabeth Waller 
Houston, Texas 

Olive Rachel Waples 
Houston, Texas 

Mary Virginia War lick 
Houston, Texas 





Ernest Augustus Weichert 
Welsh, Louisiana 

Ei'GENE Gerald Westheimer 
Houston, Texas 

James M. Whitelev 
Hillsboro, Texas 

P.NID ISOBEL Wll.DMAN 

Bellaire, Texas 

Gwendolyn Williamson 
GoUithwaite, Texas 

Kaihrvn Elizabeth Wilson 
Houston, Texas 

George Jackson Winston 
Alvin, Texas 

Edwin Madison Wolf 
Houston, Texas 

/enma Erwin Womack 
Houston, Texas 

Ei.LA Frances Woodruff 
Houston, Texas 

Margaret Ruth Woodward 
Houston, Texas 

Ei.izABEEH Lee Workman 
Houston, Texas 

Will Ellis Worley 
Houston, Texas 

Arthur G. Wright, Jr. 
Dallas, Texas 

John Harris Wrigh r 
Houston, Texas 

Margaret Wright 
Houston, Texas 

Stephen Peter Zoneff 
Sofia, Bulgaria 




FRESHMAN 
CLASS OFFICERS 



JOHN C. CarMICHAKI 

Pn-siJn,/ 



Anita Stewari- 
rice President 



Irvin B. Bfren 
Treasurer 



John Kdwin Gragc 
Secreliirv 



DANCE 
COMMITTEE 

Emil Mucke 
Chairman 

I'atricia Hamii.ion 

Sarah Katherine Arrants 

(lEORGE Bruce 

W'n.i.iAM San Giovanni 

Joe H. Bayl.ess 

Curtis Rov Patterson 



Leonaro Corvdon Abercrombif. 
Houston, Texas 

Philip Augustus Ables 
Texarkana, Texas 

William Randell Alexander 
Floydada, Texas 

Joseph Daniel Allkoch 
Houston, Texas 

Martha Agnes Allnoch 
Houston, Texas 

Genevieve Alpha 
Houston, Texas 

Patti Jean Alsup 
Galveston, Texas 

William Morris Appell 
Waco, Texas 

Lois Ethel Appleman 
Beaumont, Texas 

Carol Paschal Arnim 
Sabinal, Texas 

Frank Otis Austin 
Houston, Texas 

Hugh Clifford Avant 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Isadore Meyer Axelrod 
Houston, Texas 

J. Cross Baker 
Navasota, Texas 

Maria Ana Barreda 
Laredo, Texas 

IjVron Allen Bassel 
Belton, Texas 

Elizabeth Bauer 
Houston, Texas 





Joe Harrison Bavi.ess 
Cleburne, Texas 

(JEORGE StEEVER BeAM 

Sherman, Texas 

Hazel Inez Beate y 
Houston, Texas 

Ella Margaret Becker 
Houston, Texas 

Henr^ Martin Beissner 
Galveston, Texas 

Hans Joseph Bell 
Beaumont, Texas 

Malcolm Dorden Bennett 
Houston, Texas 

]rvin B. Beren 
Dallas, Texas 

Aaron Berger 
New York City, New York 

Charles Hermejean Bertrano 
San Antonio, Texas 

Chester I'ride Black 
Smithville, Texas 

Davio Harkness Black 
San Antonio, Texas 

Johndee Blume 
San Leon, Texas 

Dorothy Laurine Boettcher 
Houston, Texas 

I'aiu, Anthony Breyman, Jr. 
Schulenburg, Texas 

Nancy Ann Bridges 
Tampico, Mexico 

James Lanier Britton 
Houston, Texas 



Florence Melissa Brown 
Derry, New Hampshire 

Marv Margaret Brown 
Houston, Texas 

Frances Bruce 
Houston, Texas 

George Draper Bruce 
Freeport, Texas 

Marv Elizabeth Buchanan 
Dickinson, Texas 

DeForrest Basil Bynum 
McKinney, Texas 

Robert Lerov Byrne 
Houston, Texas 

John Cain 
Houston, Texas 

Allen Harn Caldwell 
San Antonio, Texas 

Frank Bell Calhoun 
Victoria, Texas 

DoRRis D. Callahan 
Houston, Texas 

Mary Sanforu Cami'bei.l 
Houston, Texas 

George Eisle Carkeel 
Houston, Texas 

John Connally Carmichael 
Sabinal, Texas 

Roy Marcellus Carpenter 
Dallas, Texas 

Rhoda Lee Carrington 
Houston, Texas 

William Richard Cashion 
Texarkana, Texas 





Arlie William Cassle 
Hamlin, Texas 

Walton Mi'rrav Gates 
Abilene, Texas 

Cress Rov Chambers 
Mart, Texas 

Imogene Christie 
Houston, Texas 

CiEORGE Alan Clapp 
Hearne, Texas 

LvNN DeWitt Clark 
Rosenberg, Texas 

Miles Wayne Clark. 
Rosenberg, Texas 

Noima Leona Clav 
Houston, Texas 

Wilbur Shaw Cleaves 
Houston, Texas 

Charlie W. Coleman 
Port Arthur, Texas 

James Leath Collier 
Houston, Texas 

Kathleen V. Collins 
Houston, Texas 

Rav Kdward Collins 
Houston, Texas 

Catherine Cosgrove 
Houston, Texas 

EvELVN Lee Coulter 
Houston, Texas 

Jack Gordon Covin 
Marshall, Texas 

l.ADV (lERrRUUE AUKI.E CoWA.V 

Houston. Texas 



Kate Markham Cox 
Monroe, Louisiana 

Louis Anthony Crapitto 
Houston, Texas 

Winnie Davis Crisp 
Houston, Texas 

Claude Tarrant Crockett 
Houston, Texas 

Howell Hohmann Cunvus 
Longview, Texas 

Hamlet Irvine Davis 
Galveston, Texas 

Lucy Waller Davis 
Houston, Texas 

Tullie Romulus Deen 
Cleburne, Texas 

Grace Mary Dellinger 
Taylor, Texas 

Bernadine L. Derrick 
Houston, Texas 

FoMBY Dickson 
Mena, Arkansas 

Hilda Marguerite Duke 
Lake Charles, Louisiana 

Marguerite Durrette 
Texarkana, Texas 

Victor B. Earnest 
Houston, Texas 

Willie Mae Eaves 
Houston, Texas 

Myrtle V. Eidelbach 
Flatonia, Texas 

Elizabeth Ann Ennis 
Houston, Texas 





Fredika Amelia Evershade 
Houston, Texas 

XoRiNE Anita Falligant 
Houston, Texas 

Jessie Farnsworth 
Houston, Texas 

Mina I.ee Farrington 
Houston, Texas 

I.orane F'itzcerai.d 
Houston, Texas 

Chari.es Henrv Fi.ato 
Kingsville, Texas 

SiAM.EV PaTI. Fl.lKINCER 

Houston, Texas 

James (Jraham Fi.vnn 
(ialveston, Texas 

Hkveri.v H. FoNVll.l.E 
Houston, Texas 

James Hovi Foote 
Stephenville, Texas 

CvNTHiA Lee Ford 
McAllen, Texas 

Cii \ Haroi.o F"()X 
BeaiinKjnt, Texas 

Wallace C. F'ranklin, Jr. 
Tulsa, Oklahoma 

BeRNICE (iARRHTT 

(jainesville, 'Texas 

Kdward William (iERKK 
T'ort Worth, 'Texas 

I'nAMEs Sara Gieseke 
Houston, Texas 

IIarrv Goldstein 
IJeaumonl, Texas 



Jeannette Gorski 
Houston, Texas 

David Grauer 
Houston, Texas 

Harrv Albert (Jrebe 
Etzatlan, Jalisco, Mexico 

George Chester Griffin 
Galveston, Texas 

Bavliss Edwards Gulleite 
Houston, Texas 

Alzira Jean Gusman 
Houston, Texas 

Dorothy Ann Hackett 
Houston, Texas 

Denard Haden 
Timpson, Texas 

Elouise Mastin Hai.i, 
Houston, Texas 

Harold Brown Hamilton 
New York City, New York 

Lawrence Ade Hamilton 
Houston, Texas 

Patricia Nale Hamilton 
Houston, Texas 

Wendell Holmes Hamrick 
Houston, Texas 

Wilbur Theodore Harless 
Gulfport, Mississippi 

Dixie Kathryn Harris 
Houston, Texas 

Beulah Marian Harrison 
Houston, Texas 

Marjorie Hayes 
Liberty, Texas 





William Lawrence Havter 
Clarendon, Texas 

Therese Ida Hebel 
Houston, Texas 

Herxice Dorothv Herbelin 
Houston, Texas 

Ann Catherine Hevck 
Houston, Texas 

ROBERL LOL IS HiGGINBOTHAM 

Alvin, Texas 

KiNCH HiLLVER, Jr. 

Houston, Texas 

Robert Artis Hollowav 
Corsicana, Texas 

Alice Mannig Hovas 
Houston, Texas 

Edith Ellen Howze 
Houston, Texas 

Mildred Howze 
Houston, Texas 

Fav Etta Hutton 
Houston, Texas 

E.lsa Louise Iselt 
Houston, Texas 

Madelin Jacobe 
Houston, Texas 

Annie Oma Jacobs 
Houston, Texas 

Henrietfa Marie Jahnke 
Houston, Texas 

Maxine Lenore Jeanes 
Houston, Texas 

I'heodore George Jellev 
Houston, Texas 



Ralph Grant Johnson 
El Campo, Texas 

John Tinker Judd 
Houston, Texas 

Menard Clyde Keene 
Galveston, Texas 

Flovd Alphonso King 
Houston, Texas 

Herman Parks Klumpi' 
Runge, Texas 

Earl Emmit Koeppe 
Fort Worth, Texas 

Dorothy Frances Kuhlman 
Houston, Texas 

Zelma Lorene Laird 
Houston, Texas 

Charline Estelle Lallier 
Houston, Texas 

Lavoisier Lamar 
San Antonio, Texas 

Virginia Dare Landis 
Houston, Texas 

Elsie Frances Laurent 
Houston, Texas 

JiANiTA Lawther 
Houston, Texas 

Louise Lenoir 
Houston, Texas 

Eric Charles Lindstrom 
Brooklyn, New York 

Donald Brooks Longcope 
Houston, Texas 

William R. Lovejov 
Houston, Texas 





Charles Richard McAfee, Jr. 
Amarillo, Texas 

Ruth McCloy 
Houston, Texas 

Harrv Wai.iers McCormick 
Houston, Texas 

Wll.LAVIE McFeRRAN 

Houston, Texas 

Bernice Elizabeth McGilvra\ 
Houston, 'I'exas 

James Calvin McNeill 
Spur, Texas 

Waldo Forrest McNeir 
Houston, Texas 

(iREGC Fernando McRevnolds 
Houston, Texas 

ClJ.l.EN JOSEI'H McWhORTER 

Houston, Texas 

Donald Theodore MacRobert 
Princeton, Indiana 

William Henrv Marmion 
Houston, Texas 

l-'.LlZABErH MasIERSON 

Houston, 'Texas 

Rose F.DiTH Maithaei 
Houston, Texas 

Homer Clarence Matthes 
(ianado, 'Texas 

Clara May Matihews 
Houston, 'Texas 

David Milton May 
(lalveston, Texas 

Joe Maynor 
Texarkana, Texas 



Iris Erne Metzler 
Houston, Texas 

Dorothy Miller 
Houston, Texas 

Gerald Kenneth Miller 
Houston, Texas 

Ernest N. Mills, Jr. 
Houston, Texas 

Raymond Hugh Moers 
Houston, Texas 

George Payne Montgomery 
Fort Worth, Texas 

Anna Bushnell Moreno 
Houston, Texas 

Harry James Moresi 
Jeanerette, Louisiana 

Philip Morrill 
Readfield, Maine 

Julia Ellen Motheral 
Houston, Texas 

Mildred Louise Muery 
Brenham, Texas 

Menton Joseph Murray 
Mercedes, Texas 

Alexander Nacy 
La Porte, Texas 

Ernest Morehead Napier 
Gulfport, Mississippi 

Edwin Christopher Neff 
Camden, Arkansas 

Leo Stanley Nelson 
Houston, Texas 

Ernest Paul Noack. 
Port Arthur, Texas 





Thomas Stephen O'Conneli. 
D:illas, Texas 

Thomas Hampton O'Neal 
Old Hickory, Tennessee 

Rl'SSELL COLLIS O'NeILL 

Sabinal, Texas 

Bei.i.e McKamil Patterson 
Houston, Texas 

I. VLB Leroy Payne 
Louise, Texas 

Albert Ogii.vv Peckham 
Port Arthur, Texas 

Mn.TON I.ons Peine 
Houston, Texas 

I.EONA SoPHRONIA PeLLV 

Pelly, Texas 

Richard Bernard Peterson 
Arlington, Texas 

James W. Pinkerton 
I^ufkin, Texas 

Ka\ MoND Harris Powers 
Crockett, Texas 

Charles Augustus Pressler 
(lalveston, Texas 

Marv F.lizabeth Prestwood 
Houston, Texas 

Thelma (ii.ADVs Price 
I)e(Juinc\', Louisiana 

Ki.i.EN Nona Rainev 
Houston, Texas 

l-RED Carl Reeves 
Houston, Texas 

Robert Glenn Reeves 
I'ottsboro, Texas 



(lEORGE Thompson Revxolds 
Dallas, Texas 

Rachael Dies Rich 
Houston, Texas 

Elbeth Vesta Richardson 
Houston, Texas 

Julian Leon Rivers 
Elgin, Texas 

John Restoff Rodelle 
Hearne, Texas 

George Travis Rolan 
Galveston, Texas 

John Augustus Roos 
Houston, Texas 

Nelson Rudmose 
Fort Worth, Texas 

Bernice Schaefer 
Houston, Texas 

Zelda Schlom 
Greenville, Mississippi 

Robert Patrick Schnabel 
Yorktown, Texas 

Irene Esther Schuppan 
Houston, Texas 

Irma Margaret Schuppan 
Houston, Texas 

Beatrice Schwartz 
Wharton, Texas 

Cherrv I.isette Schwartz 
Houston, Texas 

Margaret Matilda Scori- 
Houston, Texas 

Carmen Leah Sellers 
Houston, Texas 





I'"annie Marie Shaw 
Houston, Texas 

Marv Shaw 
(ialveston, Texas 

Marv Alice Shepherd 
Houston, Texas 

F.rHA\ Ai.i.EN Sherrii.l, 
Beaumont, Texas 

Edwin Joe Shimek 
Weimar, Texas 

Ryder Hammond Shrader 
Frisco, Texas 

Robert Tate Simpson 
Houston, Texas 

Wll.l.IAM F.NNIS SkELTON 

Denison, lexas 

Fjjward James Smith, Jr. 
Port Arthur, Texas 

John Henry Smith 
Lyons, Indiana 

Oquu-la Smith 
Houston, Texas 

I'm I IIP Bkkiram Smith 
(ialveston, Texas 

Ida Pripchett South 
Houston, Texas 

John Malcolm Sprague 
Houston, Texas 

MiLioN Robert Stallings, Jr. 
Dallas, Texas 

Vera Bell Stephenson 
Houston, Texas 

Juanita Rose Stevens 
Houston, Texas 



Anita Del Stewart 
Houston, Texas 

RiTH Fellows Stewart 
Houston, Texas 

Marv Catherine Stribling 
Rockdale, Texas 

Ola Lee Stulting 
Houston, Texas 

James Trotter Swanson 
Navas3ta, Texas 

Laura Bernice Tavler 
Saint Paul, Minnesota 

Jack Lockhart Thomson 
Houston, Texas 

Marvin M. Trevathan 
Lufkin, Texas 

Joseph Herbert Turner 
Kaufman, Texas 

Marv Rosalie Underwood 
Galveston, Texas 

Francis Wavland Vesev 
Waco, Texas 

F'ritz Paul Volkmer 
Edna, Texas 

Maggie Frances VVadrins 
Houston, Texas 

J. T. Wagoner 
Arlington, Texas 

Charles Earle Walker 
Texarkana, Texas 

Cora Sherman Walker 
Port Arthur, Texas 

Mary Elizabeth Walker 
Houston, Texas 





KiGENiA Eden Wallace 
Cameron, Texas 

(Jkrda Olive Watson 
Brenham, Texas 

Kekmhi Dakwin Watson 
Houston, Texas 

Florence Wajts 
Jeanerette, Louisiana 

I DoM'H Frederick Weicheri 
Welsli, Louisiana 

Cecil I)a\id Williams 
H(.juston, Texas 

KoBERT Ford Williams 
Houston, Texas 

Har\'e\' Allen Winglek 
Port Arthur, Texas 

Ruby Jewell Winn 
Houston, Texas 

James Aibrev Winsiun 
Smittiville, Texas 

M^Rl" FUZAIIEIH WlIHERS 

Houston, Texas 

Carlvle Womei.dorf 
Houston, Texas 

Harrv Wood, Jp. 
San Antonio, Texas 

Thomas Ooden Wood 
Houston, Texas 

Wii.BiR Wrighl, Jr. 
Waco, Texas 

Charles Wilblr Vates 
Houston, 'Texas 

David ZiBKR 
Houston, 'I'exas 




0Jampu$ 



gy^ Mr ji^e "^tii^^^ibiii^ij^fee %^i^ 



SPRING 1925 

MONG the customary things that The. Rice Campanile 
always observes is that of including m its pages an ac 
count of all of the spring activities from the preceding 
year. Each year, the Spring Elections, the May Fete, the 
Senior Socials, and the activities of Commencement have 
complete accounts in the Campanile of the following 
year. Such has been the plan in this year book, and there 
are contained in the next few pages the important affairs that occurred on 
the Rice Campus in the spring of nineteen hundred twenty-five ; the Elec 
tions, the May Fete, the Senior activities, and the Commencement services. 




SPRING ELECTIONS 



The Spring elections were featured 
by the race for the presidency of the 
Students' Association. Five candi- 
dates were m the field. C. A. Johnson 
defeated Roy Webb in the run-off. 

Margaret Lester was elected to 
the vice presidency of the Associa- 
tion, while Sam Williams won the 
office of treasurer. 

For council-man-at-large, three 
candidates announced. Mary Tram- 
mell was elected by a good majority. 



In every case, the staff nominees 
were successful, and the result was 
that Jack Glenn was elected editor 
of The Campanile; Helen Clarke, 
associate editor; Lovett Abercrom- 
bie, business manager. 

Theodore Stubbs as editor, Don- 
ald Barthleme as managing editor, 
and Ben Bellows as business man- 
ager were chosen to comprise the 
staff of The Thresher. Jack Glenn 
was re-elected yell leader. 




CAMPAIGNING 



C. A. JOHNSON 



WU<s. t •^ T ^~isr^:^^Pf(r^wxt^ 




cT'-^^ Aiee '^t^^ib^i^ivQ.tee ^^^^^ 




THE MAY FETE 



Spring, IQ25, marked the return 
to the established custom of having 
male attendants in the May Court. 
On the banks of the bayou, sur- 
rounded by dukes and duchesses. 
Her Majesty, Allie May Autry, 
was crowned Queen of the May. 

The retinue that awaited Her 
Highness as she entered the flower 
arbor at the entrance to the court 
was most impressive with its back- 
ground ot moss and trees and its ap- 
pearance ot regal pomp. The Court 
had entered singly and in pairs at 
the summons ot the herald, Mr. 
Travis Calvin . 



His Majesty, the King, Mr. Jack 
Glenn, entered alone and ascended 
the throne to greet his retinue. The 
Duke and Duchess of the House of 
Freshmen, Mr. George Murray and 
Miss Jane Dickson, followed His 
Highness, the King. These two were 
followed by the Freshmen Maids ot 
Honor. 

The herald proclaimed next the 
Duke and Duchess of the House of 
Sophomore, Mr. William McVey 
and Miss Celeste Jones. Maids of 
Honor attended these two. 

There followed then m order the 
Duke and Duchesss of the House of 




HFlkte tQ""'2^i^ iE^^^p^^itW 



Junior, Mr. Emmette Goodrich and 

Miss Marjorie Ilfrey, who in turn 
were followed by Maids, the Duke 
and Duchess of the House of Senior, 
Mr. Clarence A. Johnson and Mrs. 
Myrtle Anderson. The Maids ot 
Honor of the 
House ot Senior 
followedtheDuke 
and Duchess. 

Their Royal 
Highnesses, the 
Princess Myrtle 
of the House ot 
Perkins and the 
Princess Jessie of 

the House of Stevens were intrc 
duced to the court just before the 
herald proclaimed the entrance of 
Her Royal Highness, the Queen, 
AUie May Autry. 

As the Queen approached her 
Throne, the Court stood at atten- 
tion; the visitors were hushed. She 
was crowned then Queen of the 




May. Spring had arrived indeed. 
Among the Maids of Honor were 
Misses Mary Semmes Binyon, Esma 
Jones, Mary Freeman, Mercedes 
Romero, Margaret Lester, Margaret 
Boyd, Alice Michaux, Haijel Tanner, 
Etheldra Fraley, 
Eleanor Miller, 
Audrey Black, 
Mary Louise 
Britton, Ellen 
Ross, Nancy 
Tucker, Cather- 
ine Fondren, and 
Matilda Hood. 
Miss Beatrice 
Harrison served tor the second time 
as Court Jester. 

The Court was entertained by 
dancers who interpreted raindrops, 
rainbows, and such things symbolic 
ot spring. The annual May pole 
dance followed, and the May Fete 
of nineteen hundred and twenty- 
five was over. 




IHE I'RINCESSrS 



g-^^^ .Mriee 't7^^4?^)^t>3^fee ^^^^ 



CLASS OF ^25 




TRiNG activities of 
the class of "twen- 
ty-five" were 
brought to a 
charming close by 
the festivities ot 
the Seniors. Each 
affair was unique in itself and was 
truly a fitting close tor the four years 
of college work. 

Senior Arnencan 
The first of the socials, the Senior 
American, was held on the Rice 
Roof on the morning of June sixth. 
Breakfast began at eight-thirty, and 
each couple was served immediately 
on arrival. 

Fatty Martin's orchestra played 
tor the dancing which lasted until 
twelve-thirty. Punch was served to 
the dancers, and a strong breeze 
made the function a cool aifair. 

Senior Banquet 
On the night ot June si.xth, the 
Seniors held their last meeting over 



the banquet table at the Brazos Court. 

I. Marion Wiltord introduced Dr. 
Lovett who spoke on Rice, past and 
present. He appealed to the class to 
do its duty as alumni to push on the 
work of Rice. 

The guests sat at small tables a- 
round the alcoves, and the speakers 
occupied a large table in the middle 
ot the court. 

Final Ball 

At nine-thirty on the night of 
June eighth, Mr. Marion Wilford 
and Miss Margaret Lester led the 
grand march that opened the Final 
Ball of the class of nineteen hundred 
and twenty-five. The Rice ball room 
was decorated for the occasion with 
blue and gray streamers that hung 
trom the ceiling. 

Retreshments were served buffet 
fashion, and the gay crowd danced 
until three. 

The class of twenty-five was no 
longer a part of Rice. 




MARGARET LESTER 



"HTfete u ^"^r^~igra^t^its> aviaVH:^ 




HOOVER'S VISIT 
On Monday, May eleventh, Mr. 
Herbert Hoover addressed the stu- 
dent body ot Rice from the steps 
outside the Physics Amphitheater. 
Dr. Lovett, who introduced Mr. 
Hoover, told of his college career at 
Leland Stanford and of the fact that 
he had been made a member of the 
governing body of that school. 

In his address, Mr. Hoover stated 
that Rice was fortunate m being so 
young: traditions would not inter- 
fere with the changes necessary to 
progress. The spirit of such a place, 
Mr. Hoover told the students, en- 
courages accomplishments. 

HADAMARD 

Professor Jacques Hadamard of 
the University of Paris delivered in 
the spring of nineteen twenty-five a 
series of lectures on mathematics. 

Once before, in nineteen twenty. 
Professor Hadamard visited Rice. 
Since that time, he has won new 
honors in the field of mathematics 
and his position as the most distin- 
guished French mathematician is un- 
challenged. 



All of the Professor's lectures de- 
livered at Rice have been included 
in the Pamphlet. 

R AND QUILL 

At the close of the school year, 
the R and Quill Association held 
their annual banquet in the Brazos 
Hotel Taproom. 

Mr. James P. Markham was elect- 
ed president of the association, Miss 
Katherine Wood, vice president, and 
Mr. Wesley Herbert Hitson, secre- 
tary and treasurer. 

On the back of the rather unique 
programs was a prospective sketch 
of the proposed nine story building 
for the R and Quill activities. 

The dinner was excellent and the 
Rice Quartet made a success of the 
program with their collegiate songs. 




cr--^^ ^ice 'Uli:^^tb^)i^t>3^tge <^^^^ 




COMMENCEMENT 1 92 5 



There were strange thoughts m 
the minds of the great cap-and- 
gowned procession that paraded 
down the endless walk that led to 
the seats of those honored ones who 
were to receive the bachelor's de' 
gree of the Rice Institute. The re- 
spected men of letters that led the 
long line must have enjoyed the 
occasion, too, on which they were 
giving to the world the products of 
their long hours of labor. 



Each face bore a different expres' 
sion; there was the face of one who 
realized why Commencement was 
held; another who looked forward 
to further professional training, but 
on the face of each was the print of 
culture and of confidence. 

These graduates were leaving Rice ; 
they were leaving the home that 
they had known for four years; they 
were leaving with the thought that 
they had left something to Rice. 




^g^e t ^"^r^'lgr^^^ ^its) a^igCt^ 



L 



Baccalaureate Sermon 

On Sunday morning, June the sev- 
enth. Bishop Sam R. Hay, ot the 
Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, addressed 
the graduates in the quad- 
rangle ot the Administra- 
tion Building. With the 
Commencement archbehind 
him and the rows ot atten- 
tive Seniors before him, the 
scene would have been con- 
ducive to the best possible -'«'•£;„";;;,' 

gems of oratory. So it was _ _ 
in this case, and the Bacca- "'^' 
laureate sermon of nineteen hundred 
and twenty-five will be a key to the 
door of Commencement memories of 
the class of 'twenty-five. 

Conferring of Degrees 

The Academic Procession again 

appeared in regalia Monday, June 

eighth, headed by Dr. Lovett, Dr. 

Axson, and Trustees of the Institute. 



Dr. Stockton Axson, Professor of 
English Literature at the Rice In- 
stitute, delivered the Commence- 
ment Address. His advice was of 
unlimited value, and his 
J words of encouragement 

were thrice welcome. The 
whole of Dr. Axson's ad- 
dress was a masterpiece that 
made the graduates feel that 
could they leave no one else 
to carry on the work of in- 
struction, this one man 
-.J " would be enough to merit 
, . the attendance of a great 
~ student body. 
One hundred and seven candidates 
received the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, while twenty-three were grant- 
ed the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Garden Party 
On Monday afternoon. Dr. and 
Mrs. Lovett entertained with a gar- 
den party which closed the activi- 
ties of the class of 'twentv-five. 




cr^^ Mrice ''t7^^fc^)i^i^)^e ^^^^^ 



THE SCHOOL YEAR 1925^^26 

N THE fall of nineteen hundred twenty-five, after a three 
months' vacation, throngs returned to Rice to resume 
their studies and to carry on the student life for which 
Rice is growing famous. Football season called forth pep 
meetings, parades; Sammy appeared; the Alumni came 
home; Rice Nite and the Study Rally were held; the 

Engineering Show opened its doors, and visitors came. 

These are the events that served as landmarks for the year around which 
the incidents of Campus life can be grouped. In the following pages these 
happenings are told of and are pictured in order. Every phase of school 
life has been touched upon, and the result is an accurate record of the 
activities of the year, nineteen twenty-five — twenty-six, at Rice. 




THE ALUMNI REUNION 



The seventh annual commemora- 
tive reunion of the association of 
Rice Alumni began its meeting 
Thanksgiving morning, November 
twenty-sixth, nineteen twenty-five, 
at ten o'clock, with a business meet- 
ing in the Physics Amphitheater. 

Clarence Wademan, '21, of Hous- 
ton, was elected president of the 
association ; Miss Lolo Kennerly , '21, 
of Houston, vice president; Ervm 



Kalb, '16, of Houston, secretary and 
treasurer; and Mrs. Mary Clark 
Weir Jarvis, '21, Miss Sarah Lane, 
'19, and J. Tom Rather, '19, were 
elected for the executive board. 

All of the association members 
attended the game m the afternoon 
and their own reception at the Au- 
try House that night. The Dramatic 
Club fall plays were a feature of 
their entertainment. 




CLARENCE WADEMAN 



DR. GAYLORD JOHXSON 



nribte t ^"^r^~lgr^:^^1t^ avigCt^ 



II iiTiirii 

II III l|[ li 




THE ANNUAL FOOTBALL 
BANQUET 

On the night of November twen- 
ty-eighth, the annual tootball ban- 
quet was held in the ballroom ot the 
Rice Hotel. 

Mr. A. M. Tomtohrde served as 
toastmaster, and D. C. Jarvis, E. 
Hjertberg, Captain Underwood, F. 
J. Bedenk, ]. W. Heisman, and the 
captain-elect were scheduled to make 
toasts. 

Fourteen letters were awarded to 
the squad, and Wash Underwood 



was re-elected captain to serve in 
'twenty-six. 

COLLEGE INN BANQUET 
On Wednesday night, December 
second, the footballsquadandcoaches 
gathered at Ye Olde College Inn for 
a banquet given them by George 
Martin, proprietor of the Inn. 

Informal talks were made by Heis- 
man, Hjertberg, Martin, and C. E. 
Greene, after which, by vote of the 
entire squad, "Heavy" Underwood 
was awarded a trophy for being the 
most valuable man on the team. 




(DING OF THE COLLEGE INN IRor'HV 



(T^-^^ J^iei^^ "^C^ ^^JA^i^tge ^^^^^ 




SAMMY 



The night before the A. and M. 
game, November thirteenth, marked 
the return of an old figure to Rice : 
Sammy was back again after eight 
years. 

In body, he was not the Sammy 
that the Owl Protective Associa- 
tion back in 1917 had rescued from 
the Aggie cadets, after the latter 
had kidnapped him; but he was the 
same in spirit, reincarnated under 
the direction of the Rally Club by 
John Clark Tidden and a group of 
architects. 




That night in the commons, Sam- 
my was put in the spotlight, the 
band played "For Rice's Honor,'' 
and the greatest rally in the short 
history of Rice ended just before the 
great parade began. The next day 
the Aggies invaded Rice, and Sammy 
made a majestic debut upon the 
field, while all Rice stood, uncovered, 
and cheered his return. 

Two veterans — T. P. Jackson and 
J. S. Waters, a former O. P. A. — 
were at Rice this year to witness 
the return of Sammy. 



^ Ig^'t :^ 







SAMMY AND THE O.P.A.'S. 1917 



^TTUe t ^'"^r^~t r^7^ ^1ts> avigCt^ 




RICE XITE 



STUDY RALLY 



RICE NITE 



The Rally Club staged in the 
Physics Amphitheater, April tweri' 
ty-third, the first annual Study 
Rally. There was an effort to impress 
upon the athletes the critical condi- 
tion ot Rice athletics. 

Mr. Heisman addressed the gath- 
ering and, after his talk, the Baptist 
Students' LJnion presented, to be 
placed in the Trophy case, a trophy 
on which can be engraved the rec- 
ords of each team of tour sports 
for the next ten vears. 



Another creditable thing ot which 
the Rally Club can boast is that of 
beginning what probably will be a 
tradition-- the annual ot Rice Nite. 

The initial performance was put 
on May fifth at the City Auditc 
num. Lee's Owls, the Glee Club, and 
the Dramatic Club contributed to 
the program. 

The Owl Band closed the regular 
program, and dancing began at eleven 
o'clock. Proceeds were in the hands 
ot the Alumni Association. 




g"^'^^ JKriee "Ut^^i^tii^ivj^fee ^^^^'^" 



FOURTH BIENNIAL ENGINEERING SHOW 



At two o'clock 
on the afternoon of 
April twenty- 
third the doors 
were opened on the 
fourth biennial En- 
gineering Show. 

In the cloisters of 
the Physics Build- 
ing each vistior was 
introduced to a ra- 
dio controlled car 
that made its way 
up and down the 
long walk. 

Entrance to the 
whole show was 
gained through the 
biology depart- 
ment, where the 
mysteries of disease, the wonders of 
the microscopic world, and the evo- 
lutionary and sensational nature of 
life were explained. 

This is the first time that the biol- 
ogy department has been included 
m the plans for the biennial show. 

The Physics exhibits and the Civil 
Engineering displays were included 




m the Physics 
building. 

In the Mechani- 
cal building were 
the representative 
outlays of the Me- 
chanical Engineer- 
ing Department 
and of the Electri- 
cal Department. 
■ In the Chemistry 
building were ar- 
ranged the exhibits 
of the Chemical 
Engineers, the Ar- 
chitects and the Bi- 
ological Chemists. 
Facultymembers 
served as heads of 
the departments: 
Biology, Mr. Edgar Altenberg; Phy- 
sics, Mr. H. A. Wilson; Civil Engi- 
neering, Mr. L. B. Ryon, Jr.; Elec- 
trical Engineering, Mr. H. K. Hum- 
phrey ; Mechanical Engineering, Mr. 
J. H. Pound; Chemical Engineering, 
Mr. H. B. Weiser; Biological-Chem- 
istry, Mr. H. O. Nicholas; Archi- 
tecture, Mr. W. W. Watkm. 



ENTRANCE 




nribte t^'ZW^iE^^^P'^va.iX^ 



EXHIBITS 





MECHANICS 




:hemistrv 



cr--^^^ J^iee '^C^^^^)i^1^fee ^^^^^ 




l.\"I.E CASHIO> 



LOCV' EXPERI-MEN'T> 



Lyle Cashion, of Texarkana, had 
the entire show m his charge, and 
under him were the tollowmg man' 
agers: 

Donald Vmes Henderson, Biology ; 
Maurice Ewmg, Physics; Frank H. 
Payne, Civil Engineering; John S. 
Robertson, Electrical Engineering; 
Franklin K. Davis, Chemistry; Clar- 
ence Krause, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing; Ripley Hanrick, Radio; Joe G. 
Pasternack, Biological-Chemistry; 
Clarence Alfred Johnson, Architec- 



ture; Julius Lyman Edward Erick- 
son, Organic Chemistry; Malcolm 
M. Harless, Personnel and Finance; 
and Jack Bridgwater, Publicity. 

The Engineering Society, the spon- 
sor for the show, is presided over 
by John S. Robertson. K. K. Krea' 
mer is vice president; E. H. Austin, 
secretary; W. F. Black, treasurer; 
and R. M. Garrison, executive com- 
mitteeman. 

Approximately twenty thousand 
people visited the show. 




TELEPHONE EXCH.4NGE 



HTke t ^"^r^~l8!^ir^p a^i gVll:^ 



VISITORS 




.'ISIT OF THE ART LEAGl'E OFFICERS 



Doctor T. R. Glover 
On September twenty-ninth and 
thirtieth and on October first and 
second, Dr. Terrot Reaveley Glov- 
er, Fellow and Classical Lecturer m 
St. John's College and Public Orator 
m the University ot Cambridge, de- 
livered a series ot lectures on the sub- 
ject ot Democracy in the Ancient 
Greek World. Dr. Glover's tirst topic 
was The Prelude, then The Dawn, 
alter which came The Noonday and 
The Twilight. 

Professor Paul de Reul 
Professor Paul de Reul, Professor 
of English and Modern Literat jre at 



the University of Brussels, deHvered 
on the ninth, tenth, eleventh, and 
twelfth of December a group of lec- 
tures on Browning. 

Mr. Walter L. Clarke 

During the week of January ninth, 
Mr. Walter L. Clarke, president of 
a prominent New York art league, 
visited the Institute. 

Sir Henry Hadow 

April seventh, eighth, and ninth 

were the dates of the lectures on 

music delivered at Rice by Sir Henry 

Hadow, an eminent British authority. 





JTallj^p*^^ 



REGISTRATION DAY 




Students, new and old, crowd the Sallyport, while awe-stricken Slimes stage their first "Foot 
Trace" under the stern commands of domineering Sophomores 




Shedding cloaks of formality. 

Slime and Slimess meet each 

other in chivalrous fashion — 





At noon, the Sallyport suffers 

a calm while the bravest go 

home for lunch 




-while some go even further 



The new-made Slime, dethroned "con- 
noisseur," comes down to earth in a 
moth ball race 



GREETINGS 




The rounds of handshakes and greetings mark the formal opening of campus life 




Boulevard Service begins on 
the first day 





The business of unpacking be- 
comes a pleasure 




Bare legs and scanty costumes appear 

for the traditional Slime Niteshirt 

Parade 



Freshmen learn Math early- 
the angle theta 



''THEY'RE OFF' 




Trembling eagerlv and garbed in clothes they didn't bring from home, the Slimes go forth 
to explore new worlds — their first class 




Friday arrives, and Sophomore 

co-eds become authorities on 

Slimess fashion 




With blasted pride, the Slime 
learns that "there ain't no jus- 
tice" — room cleaning 




The first assignments send students hurriedly to a crowded co-op 



PEP RALLIES 




With the coming of football, the pliysics amphitheater rings with the noise of pre-game 

hullaballoo 




Slimes become versed in one of 
their most important school du- 
ties — advertising pep rallies - 




-Parading the cloisters in strange 

garb and shaking the A. B. with 

much stranger noises 




Friday at 12:30 — the gang enters the Amph with the determination to raise the roof with 

their yells 



PEP PARADES 




On the eve of a game, hundreds jam the Rice Hotel corner for a monster demonstration 

of enthusiasm 




From the Rice Hotel balcony, 
Glenn shrieks a message of foot- 
ball fight 



liiF''iiP" 




-leading the gang in a series of 
yells 




"Main and Lamar, 7:30" — the long line assembles for a pep parade 



ROOTING SECTION 




In the Texas University Memorial Stadium, some thousand Owl rooters open their mouths 
for the famous "Yea Rice" 





Slimes, dressed in fantastic cos- 
tumes, entertain the stands be- 
tween halves 



The rooting section raises a big 

hullaballoo as the team runs on 

the field 




The most impressive ceremony that a son of Rice can experience~"For Rice's Honor"- 
sung before the kickoff 



'ON TO AUSTIN" 




The Texas stadium with its great crowd witnesses the maneuvers of the Owl Band 







^:.!^ 




Mli 



m 



Four Rice students go up in the 
air over the Austin trip — 




— while most go in the usual 
way — on the special 




The Rally Club replaces the Texas Cowboys in forming the T. U. on the field between halves 



■ '■ "■■■■ ■""''• ■ ' ^"- '- ■ ^ ■'-■:'■- 



I II Hit'iln 



'SMASH THOSE AGGIES" 




All of Rice gathers at Main and Lamar to form the great parade on the night before the 

Aggies come to town 



Fas" 



IT RALLY 12=30 AM PH 
I Those Assies-FwhtLikiHeu 




Signs on the court hedge an- 
nounce the pep rallies 




In the Commons that night — 
Sammy makes his debut — Tears 
and cheers mark the final rally 




The big parade announces in no uncertain tones that Rice is out to win and that she will 

"Fight Like Hell" 






MORE RICE FIGHT 




Several hundred Rice men welcome the team on its return from L. S. U. 




The long line parades through 
the Union Station 





Sammy reappears at the A. 

& M. game to remind the 

gang that "Rice Fight Never 

Dies" 




Yells and cheers serve as a warm 
greeting to the team 



An early morning parade wakes Hous- 
ton before the milk man makes his 
rounds 



THANKSGIVING 




The co-eds do their stuff before the Ba> lor ganit 




Glenn has a bouyant feeling 

betweenhalvesattheThanks- 

giving game — his last grid 

game as cheer leader 




The Annual Shoerace affords the spec- 
tators an unusual sort of pleasure 






Slimes perform fittingly for the 
last game of the season 



' '::iiililliiiiiliilililll!iiiiJi{lllliL 




The Freshmen don't find things 

so pleasant — Trying to find 

"Theirs" 



ililiililiiilllliilililiiiiiliiimiiii 



THE OWL BAND 




>-^''^^m -^^k^^ 







The newly uniformed band gets off on the right foot by appearing at the opening game 





Eight thousand people see the 

band manuevers at the A. & M. 

game 





In the Texas stadium, the 

Rice inusicians perform for 

the crowd 



Lee's gang broadcasts during the 
games 




The famous "Medley" officially an- 
nounces the openhig of the season 



CLOISTERS 




Cloister courses contribute nothing toward graduation, but tliey afford a valuable service 



fW^Zl 



l^ifitJ^* 






It' 
5- ^^ 





A new notice on the bulletin 
board attracts its usual crowd 



The Sallyport continues to 

serve as the center for social 

life 





Some spend valuable time going to 
and from the Chem building — 




-while others spend their time 

more profitably ''lllllliil|i|ll'li'l!'i|l 



CLASSES 




The best known thing in a Freshman's life — Bugs 100 in the Physics Amphitheater 




The toilers in the Bugs lab learn 

the use of the microscope 

— also 





The downstairs library gets 
its daily rush for books 




A few students take Pullman 

courses; others take all Pullman 

courses 



The hairy-eared engineers hold out- 
door classes — surveying 



DORM LIFE 




After dinner, a Bull Pen gathers to discuss the future of the race and to consider plans for 

its salvation 




The unwelcome alarm clock 
begins the morning bath rush 





Almost the last stage in the 
business of dressing for a date 




Somebody got a haircut! Posed by a 
gang getting "rinctums" 



Constantly the halls are filled 
with some sort of musical efforts 



DORM LIFE 




The King of Indoor Sports poker at a penny a round 





This lad had his name called at 
an eight-thirty class, but — . 



These spent the hour in pursuit 
of knowledge 




I'm 



Adjoining the showers are the long lines of wash basins that serve many purposes — shaving, 
toothbrushing, shoe shining, etc. 



MESS HALL 




Plates clatter and knives and forks click as the hungry studes get their fill in the Commons 





Cop, the mess hall doS, handles 
the surplus food 



The hard working cooks take 
,tlme,-p.i|,|;„t;ft„I)p,se„ 




The Seniors entertain their ladj friends in their own dining hall 





NO GRAFTS, BUT 




The cleaning and pressing establisliment announces a full line of goods 




The Book Store permits a poker 
game to proceed 






7 n 




One of the best businesses — dis- 
tribution of daily newspapers 




Candy can be bought right in 
the dormitories 




Not the preparation for a shoe race, 

but a stack of shoes going out for 

repair 



DIVERSIONS 




Rice's one-hole course gives ample opportunity for practice to embryonic golfers 




At odd times, amid the quiet 
of study, a radio blares out 




In the late afternoon, all Rice gathers 
along the boulevard for an airing 





Most anybody's car may become 
a palace for "auto bridge" 




The Scullions' Ball was called a 
diversion 



AUTRY HOUSE 




Where the non-dormitory men eat and listen to the babble of feminine voices — the Autry 

House Cafeteria 




Music, drinks, and newspapers 

make the boys' lounge room 

popular - 




!l!!'li;i'!!i;i"!li'nilll!'!ili'"" 

-While those who care not to 
lounge can merely drink 






ifiil 




The famous Autrv House Duo — Mr. Masterson and Mrs. Blake 



TRANSPORTATION 

-4. .Sl 






'Town, please" greets the ears of all motorists who venture to pass the "Boulevard Service 
Station" at any time of day 





Some impatient students take a 
chance on riding the 
Toon CI Mile 



— while others furnish their own 

transportation — and leave their 

cars in front of the A. B. 




The universality of modern transportation is well illustrated by a few of the more efficient 

_ . ! !l.l_.,!L„i__.,ljl!li.in}i.|i!i.,..._tL,.._i ji.,.i.(.__i.(l....i.iil.l. Hf^lllTfi mnH^lc ..__l..t,... .._. 



;!il,!«,,li 



STRUGGLES 





The Big Struggle ends when the Slimes drag the disappointed Sophs through the (ire hose 
stream in the Tug-O-War 




The Sophs collect the night be- 
fore their dance to try to rescue 
their kidnapped president 





Another struggle — the politi- 
cal one occupies the spotlight 
in the late spring 




The gym serves as the scene of 
another struggle or two — the 
Band Dance 



The Slimes are the goats in the annual 
Shoerace, a choice morsel in the cata- 
log of struggles 



SNOW 




Snow, a rare treat for Houston and Vicinity, conceals the campus beneatli a whiteblanket 




Cold-hearted co-eds find the 
climate very agreeable 



n* 




Exactly 113 girls try to put snow 
down somebody's back 




A huge snow-hght fills the cloisters 
with shouts and even disturbs classes 



Between and during lectures, 
big he-men display their prowess 



SOUTHWEST RELAYS 




The big relay receives more interest from the spectators than any other one event 




(31 \ sBS=*..^ 5B ii j Py 4 ' j:^ 



Charles Paddock gets on the line 



The high school hurdles Attract un- 
usual attention 



NEIGHBORS 




Just across the Boulevard at the entrance to Hermann Park, the Autry House makes plain 
the fact that it is a part of Rice 




r\ 




Contributing its share to the 

cultured vicinity is the Art 

Museum 




General Sam Houston i 
near neighbor of the 
Institute 





Where Rice men find amusement on 
late spring afternoons — Miller Mem- 
orial Theater 



Ye Olde College Inn stands a- 

cross from the Athletic Field 

and serves Rice 



EXEUNT 




An event both anticipated and recollected with mingled pleasure and sadness — packing 

to go home 




Freshmen are made to realize 
that they are still Slimes 




"And then, the gang piles on the 
train and waves a goodbye 




Commencement exercises bring to a close another year in the history of Rice 



HEHbte t ^'^ ^ iE^'is^p avigit^ 



THE ANCIENT PASTIME 

uRiNG several aeons, dancing has been a natural expres- 
sion ot man's emotions. Much is heard of reversion to 
type, but modern dancing is scarcely this — it is a con- 
tinuation, with light, color, and motion, ot the response 
that man has always made, in one fashion or another, to 
rhythmic sounds. 

Let It never be said that the students of Rice would 
depart from the way they should go. Sponsored by millions of generations, 
dancing has become their most popular collegiate pastime, and who can 
say that the background of flaming campfires and yelling savages — sullen 
tom-tom and stealthy houris- -brazen gong and swaying geishas — stately 
harpsichord and courtly dancers of the minuet —does not add dignity to, 
and a blessing on the heads of saxophonists and exponents of the modern 
dance? 




SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 



With one of the finest college or- 
chestras in the South furnishing the 
music. The Saturday night dances 
have been a popular amusement. 
Crowds of beauteous damsels and 
irresistible lady-killers have taxed the 
capacity of Autry House and the 
commons. Lee's Owls have played 
tor all ot these affairs. 

The orchestra, composed of Lee 
Chatham, leader and trombonist ex- 
traordinary; Jack Gray, piano; Joe 
Jarrett, trumpet; Tooker Abrahams 



and Wallace Franklin, clarinet and 
saxophone; Waldo Boyles, saxo- 
phone; Sam Bennett, bass horn; and 
J. L Campbell, traps, has had a phe- 
nomenal development. 

Not organized until September, 
in six months they had a harmonious 
unison which rivalled any other or- 
chestra Houston could boast. They 
have had many attractive offers. 
They plan to tour Europe in the 
summer of 1926, paying, like old- 
world minstrels, by playing. 




g^^^ Jj^iei^^ 'U1l:^^)b^t^t^fee ^^^^^^" 




ENGINEERING SOCIETY DANCE 

The night of November tenth was shared the responsibiHty for the mu- 



marked by the annual Engineer's 

Ball held at the new University Club . 

Blanchard's and the Virginian's 



sic. Mr. Malcolm Harless, president, 
with Miss OquiUa Smith, led the 
grand march. 



RALLY CLUB DANCE 



There have been many complaints 
that the non-athletic students had 
no part in the feverish activity of the 
football season. In answer to these, 
the Rally Club was organized, hav- 
ing as its purpose the crystaUization 
of the spirit of the school, in a body 
of men who have ideals, coupled 



with the energy and personality to 
defend and establish them. 

The Rally Club, this new organ- 
ization at Rice, estabhshed a tradi- 
tion by celebrating the close of the 
football season with a dance on 
Thanksgiving night. 

From nine to three, Lee and his 




^TFKe t 'Sr^r ^ ~iSr ^^m-ig> -ej^ietit^ 



good men played in 
one ot the cleverest 
settings m a season of 
many notably decor- 
ated dances. The foot- 
ball field had been 
bodily transported to 
the Turnverein. The 




wound with blue and 
gray streamers. The 
Field House itself 
loomed behind the or- 
chestra, and from the 
balcony a large owl 
spread his wmgs over 
the room. It is planned 



floor was lined off with yardage to make the Rally Club Thanksgiv- 
markers, and the "grandstands'' were mg dance an annual affair. 

GALVESTON CLUB DANCE 



The Galveston Club dance 
was heldon the night of De- 
cember twenty-sixth, from 
nine to three, in the ballroom 
of the Galvez Hotel. Over- 
head, a swarm of blue and 
gray balloons formed a great 
"R." 

Each dance was dedicated 
to a football team; eight to 




conference teams, and one to 
the Ball High team. 

During the midnight inter- 
mission a tribute was paid to 
the Ball High football letter 
men, and each was called by 
name. Sam Williams, presi- 
dent, spoke on behalf of Rice, 
urging the high school men's 
allegiance to her. 



TEXARKANA CLUB DANCE 



Football blankets, pennants, ser- 
pentine, and confetti made the ball- 
room of the Grim Hotel, of Texar- 
kana, gay for the annual dance of 
the Texarkana Club. 



The first four dances were each in 
honor of one of the four college 
classes; the last three: "For Rice's 
Honor," "The Sallyport Breeze," 
and "The Mess Hall Scramble." 



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SCULLIONS BALL 
The 1926 Hobo gathering was 
held on the railroad siding. Along 
one side stood rows of box-cars, and 
entrance was perilously gained down 
a ladder on the side of one of these. 
On the other side were more or less 
— mostly less — open fields. The Sen- 
lor dining room was a bewildering 
mixture of barn-yard, livery stable, 
photographer's shop, pseudo art-gal- 
lery and penny arcade. Sam Wil- 
liams was president of the Scullions. 





W^tz U 9'"^r^~lgr^7^.its> .avtgct^ 




ARCH I 'ARTS BALL 



The Architectural Society's ball, 
held in the Field House on the 
night of February twenty- 
second, was an affair ot 
'"more'than-Oriental' 
splendor/' The Arabian 
Night's Entertainment, 
ARRANTs ^j^j^ jj-g endless possibili- 
ties of design and costume, was 
the inspiration for the ball. 



Beautiful houris — ot doubtful au- 
thenticity, but none the less beauti- 
ful — danced democratically and im- 
partially with camel drivers, genii, 
slaves, and Pashas. Harems were de- 
cidedly au fait and were evident. 

At twelve o'clock, Mr. Edward 
Arrants, president of the Architec- 
tural Society, with Miss Matilda 
Hood, led the grand march, which 




g^^^^ Mriee '^jir^^ibiA^t^i^fee ^^^^-^" 




was made spectacular by the bril- 
liant robes and turbans of the guests. 
Mr. Arrants was general chair- 
man; Claude E. Hooten, chairman of 
decorations; J. I. Campbell, finance; 
C. A. Johnson, refreshments; Oliver 
C. Winston, bids and invitations; 
Eugene Werlin, programs; and Sol 
Slaughter, music. Lee's Owls played. 



Patrons : James A. Baker, Sr., John 
Bute, W. T. Carter, Don L. Cave, 
E. L. Crain, Robt. J. Cum- 
mins, John W. Dehnert, ...r.,, ,' 
A. B. Ellis, Joseph Finger, -Y 
Alfred C. Finn, Don Hall, . ^ ' -. 
L.W. Macatee,C.H.Neb- . / 
lett,E.A.Peden,TheTexas 
Blue Print Company. hood 




nffeve U~^"^r^~lgr^i!:^^ »a^ii^7C^ 



JUNIOR PROM 




On the 
night oi 
March the 
first, the 
class of 
1927 was 
host at the 
annual Ju- 
nior Prom 
in honor of 
the gradu' 
atingclass. 
The dance was given at River Oaks 
Country Club. 

The long ball room represented a 
Spanish patio. Low vine'covered 
stucco walls almost encircled the 
room, and on the wall at the far 
end, above graceful palm trees, hung 
one of the most artistic decorations 
seen at any dance ot the year — an 
enormous Spanish shawl — black, 
with irndescent flowers and long. 




swaying 

fringe. In 

the light ot 

hidden 

flares, the 

flowers 

were of 

startling 

beauty — 

the great 

room 

needed no '"""' 

further adornment. 

Mr. John Sutton, president, and 
Miss Etheldra Fraley, vice president 
of the Junior class, led the grand 
march. 

Lee's Owls and the famous Vir- 
ginians furnished music for the dance. 

At midnight, supper was served, 
and at a little past three, the last 
cars rolled away, with the numbers 
— ''27'" — still winking cheerfully. 




g'^^^^llt'ic^I^^ '^tti.^lb^tl^lj^fee ^^^^^^ 




The president of the Junior class 
was Mr. John Sutton; vice presi- 
dent, Miss Etheldra Fraley; secre- 
tary, Mr. Robert Abies; treasurer, 
Mr. Benjamin Bellows. 

The committees for the dance were 
as follows: 

General chairman, Mr. Walter 
Fondren; decorations, Mr. Jesse 
Madden; finance, Mr. Benjamin Bel- 
lows ; music, Mr. Ewell Strong, chair- 
man; sub-committee. Miss Marga- 
ret Thompson, Mr. Harvin Moore. 



Refreshments: Miss Pearl Hooker, 
chairman; sub-committee. Miss Eth- 
eldra Fraley, Mr. Shirley Helm. Pro- 
grams, Mr. Frank Gordon, chairman; 
sub-committee. Miss Anna Helen 
Koch. 

Patrons were: Mrs. James L. Au- 
try; Mr. and Mrs. I. Lee Campbell; 
Mr. and Mrs. James Chillman; Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles L. Fitch; Mr. and 
Mrs. W. W. Fondren; Mr. and 
Mrs. Stuart A. Giraud; and Dr. and 
Mrs. Gaylord Johnson 




TUr^ t ^"-^r^~lgr^7^^its> »aviait^ 



SOPHOMORE BALL 



The nineteen twenty-six Sopho- 
more Ball was held under rather pe- 
culiar conditions. Heretofore, the 
Freshmen have fled on the 
eve ot their own social ice- 
breaker with second year 
men pursuing them. But, 
since the usual Freshmen 
Ball had been prohibited be- 
cause of the loss ot sleep 
and study time that it nec- 
essitated, the situation was reversed. 
Mr. Jack Ogg, president, and Miss 
Matilda Hood, vice president, were 
scheduled to lead the grand march 
— but they were kidnapped uncer- 
emoniously. 

The Class of "28 were in a terrible 
plight; a Freshman was surely not 
to lead the grand march! As a result 
of strategic manuevers. Miss Hood 
was rescued, a crowd Freshmen 



-|H 


f 

I 


w 



were entombed in the bastile-like 
basement of the City Auditorium, 
but Mr. Ogg was not to be found. 
The outcome was a titty-titty 
compromise or victory for 
each class. Miss Hood led the 
grand march, but Mr. Gor- 
don Turrentme was forced 
to substitute tor the absent 
Ogg, who did make a slight- 
ly inglorious appearance la- 
ter in the evening. 

The dance was a success. It was 
the first official Rice dance to be held 
at the Warwick Hotel, and the Soph- 
omores say that it will not be the 
last. There were no extra decora- 
tions; those of the ballroom were 
considered suthcient. Unique pro- 
grams and Harold Oxley's orchestra 
music helped to make everybody 
happy. 



SECOND ANNUAL BAND DANCE 



The Band Dance was held in the 
Field House on the twenty-seventh 
of April, nineteen hundred and twen- 
ty-six. From ten-thirty to twelve, 
especially, one ot the largest crowds 
that ever attended a Rice Saturday 
Night Dance filled the gymnasium. 



Lee's Owls were in excellent con- 
dition, and they were never more 
''right." The crowd was in a festive 
mood, and the whole thing was de- 
cidedly a good party. Band men 
checked hats, took tickets, and did 
the work ot putting the dance over. 




g-^^ JKriee ""CW-^ibtA^iya^fee ^^^^ 



RECEPTIONS 



The Y.M., Y.W.C.A. reception, 
was held in the cloisters immediately 
after the opening of school 
in September, and served to 
welcome new students to 
Rice. 

The afternoon of October 
ninth was the occasion for 
a reception held by the Eliza- 
beth Baldwin, the Pallas 
Athene, and the Owen Wister Lit- 
erary Societies. The receiving line at 
the door was composed of the officers 
of the three clubs, who welcomed 
Freshmen girls and all prospective 




pledges. Along the north side of the 
long room a refectory table was set. 
Mrs. Eugene Blake and Mrs. 
Sara Stratford poured tea 
and coffee for about two 
hundred and fifty guests. 

The home of Miss Janet 
Allen was the scene of a 
charming tea given by the 
O.W.L.S. in honor of the 
P.A.L.S. and E.B.L.S. on the after- 
noon of Novem.ber twenty-second. 
Mrs. A. D. McKiUop and Mrs. A. 
K. Newbury poured tea for the 
guests. 



P.A.L.S. DANCE FOR PLEDGES 



The Pallas Athene Literary So- 
ciety entertained in honor of their 
fourteen pledges on the afternoon of 
November fourth with an informal 
tea dance at the Autry House. The 



affair lasted from four-thirty to six- 
thirty. 

Punch was served throughout the 
afternoon, and, at five, tea, sand- 
wiches, and cake were announced. 



E.B.L.S. CARD PARTY 



On the afternoon of November 
tenth, the Elizabeth Baldwin Liter- 
ary Society held their annual card 
party in the large ballroom of the 
Rice Hotel. 



From the stage, Lee's Owls play- 
ed, and pledges of the E.B.L.S. sold 
candy among the hundred odd tables. 

Tea and wafers were served dur- 
ing the afternoon. 




nrfetje_u ^^^^~~(8r"cai!:?taits> .evigcte" 




CRAMNER CLUB VALENTINE DANCE 



The annual Valentine Dance ot 
the Cramner Club was held this 
year on February fifteenth as a sup- 
per dance, from five to seven. 

The Autry House was decorated 



with hearts which hung from scar- 
let streamers. A Hfe-sise Queen of 
Hearts was the center of a huge val- 
entine that lined the wall behind the 
orchestra. Lee's Owls played. 



E.B.L.S. TEA FOR SENIORS 



On theafternoon of April fifteenth, 
from five to seven, the Elizabeth 
Baldwin Literary Society received 
their friends at the home of Mrs. 
W. W. Fondren in honor of their 
Senior members. 



Attractive boudoir pillows in the 
club colors, purple and white, were 
presented to each of the honorees, 
while Miss Martha Scott, the retir- 
ing president, received a loving cup. 
More than a hundred guests called. 



P.A.L.S. COUNTRY DANCE 



On the night of Tuesday, April 
twentieth, about four hundred 
"hicks'" gathered in the Commons 
for the Pals" Country Dance. 



Miss Anita Stewart and Mr. Har- 
ry Duckett received prizes for their 
costumes, and Mr. Hendnx Davis 
won the raffled cake. 




HFlbte t ^~^ 1^ (gr^T^s^its^ ^xiiit^ 




JOHN CLARK TIDDEN 



Tidden, actor, artist, and student's 
friend, left Rice m December, 1925. 
It was Rice who lost — more es' 
pecially, the students. Who can say 
how much they lost! The Dramatic 
Club, the Owl, the Campanile, the 
Architectural Society - -m short, the 
student body, individually and as a 
whole, felt keenly 
f Mr. Tidden's de- 
parture. 

Ever ready to 
help, always friend- 
ly, clear and strong 
in his own ideals, 
Mr. Tidden step- 
ped into student 
hearts as professors 
seldom do. 

Distinguished 




for his student proficiency at the 
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, 
Mr. Tidden came to Rice m 1914 as 
instructor in architectural drawing 
and painting and immediately took 
a prominent place m the life of the 
school as well as in the art circles of 
Houston and South Texas. 

In 1921 he direct- 
ed the establish- 
ment of the Rice 
Dramatic Club and 
was its guiding 
light up until the 
time of his depar- 
ture. It is this or- 
ganization that 
will feel most keen- 
ly the loss of John 
Clark Tidden. 




cr^^^^^ MXce 'UiSi^^lbitl^i^fce '^^^^ 




THE DRAMATIC CLUB 



The Rice Dramatic Club, since 
its organization tour years ago, has 
made for itself a place at Rice and 
in Little Theatre circles in Houston. 

It is made up of the people at 
Rice who are interested in dramat- 
ics and whose interest leads them 
to try out for entrance into the club. 
In these tryouts, which the club 
holds at the beginning of each term, 
they are judged solely upon their 
dramatic talent, and are taken m for 
a year on probation. At the end of 
each year, permanent members are 



elected on the merit they have shown . 

In the year 1925-26 J. B. Earth- 
man managed the club during the 
fall bill, and on his resignation Fred 
Shelton was elected manager. 

Adele Roensch held the only other 
office of the club, that of secretary- 
treasurer, and John Clark Tidden 
served as faculty advisor. 

Although the club has no regular 
meetings, called meetings are held 
for the election of officers and of new 
members, and before and after the 
one bill of each term. 








ARROWOOD 



60VE 



DIRECTORS 



Hflbte t ^"^r^~lgr^:^^i\5) avigtit^~" 




■THE DEACO 



The fall term productions of the 
Dramatic Club were presented be- 
fore one of the largest and most 
responsive audiences ever 
present at any of the at' 
tempts of the club 
at Autry House. 
The bill included 
three one-act plays. In 
The Girl, by Edward 
Pepple, the excellent 

NU ROBERTS ^^^^ ^f ^^^^^ Q^^J, 

rich made much of the small part 
of Kreps, the butler. The action 
of the play centered around "the 
girl/' and with tew exceptions moved 
easily through the smooth dialogue 
of Donald McRoberts and Henry 




THE FALL AND SPRING BILLS 

Easterling. The Gir! was carefully 
worked out and was well received. 
Philip Gove,AdeleRoensch directed. 
Gilbert Cannan's Evsrsi- 



0^ 



hody^s Husband directed 
by Mrs. C. F. Arrowood, 
offered 
good op 
portunity 
for the in- 
terpretation ot contrast- 
ing parts by Louise Lam- easterling 
berson, Beatrice Harrison, and Flor- 
ence Brown. The contrast was em- 
phasized by effective costuming. The 
action of the play as a whole was 
not smooth, but the unfavorable re- 
ception given It on its first presenta- 





■EVERVBODY'S HT 



cT'^^^ J^iei^ '^t^-^fei)^'a3^fee ^^^^^ 




GOODRICH 



tion was in a large part due to bad 
lighting and poor stage setting. 

Hazel Cannan did the leading role 
of the modern daughter. The dreamy 
quality ot her voice 
contributed much to 
the atmosphere of 
the play. This was 
intensified by an in- 
teresting bit of work 
by Theodore Stubbs 
as Domino. 
SHELTON- Florence Brown, 

who appeared with the club for the 
first time, was especially noteworthy. 
The Deacon s Hat, by Jeannette 
Marks, an hilarious comedy, was 




given probably the best reception of 
the three plays. It was later pre- 
sented before the convention of the 
Southern Art League at Houston. 
The excellent inter- 
pretation ot the Dea- 
con by Fred Shelton 
and of Neli by Helen 
Clarke were the out- 
standing features of 
the play. Chauncey 
Stewart, as the 
impractical Hughie, 
gave a delicate de- 
lineation of a hard part. Joe Gallegley 
directed the play. The bill was given 
December 2 and 3. 





Wh. e t WZW~^ ^^^1^ ^va^ttw 




"THE MARRIAGE GOWN" 



The Spring production, was given 
at Autry House on April 22 and 
23. The customary bill of three one- 
act plays included two comedies and 
a tragedy. In Such a Charming 
Toung Man, by Zoe Atkins, lead- 
ing roles were taken by Frank Good- 
rich, Marjone Lockman, and Ger- 
trude Kellog. The rest of the cast 
included Mary Margaret Brown, J. 
B. Earthman, Bert Hitson, Donald 
McRoberts, Edwm Wolf, and Molly 
Tidden. The play was directed by 
Agnes Tidden. 



The tragedy, Judith K. Sollen- 
berger's The Marriage Gown, direct- 
ed by Philip Gove and Patterson 
Lillard, was fortunate in a well cho- 
sen cast made up of Florence Brown, 
Martha Scott, Fred Shelton, and 
Beatrice Harrison. 

Mrs. M. Gordon Jones tor the 
first time directed a Dramatic Club 
production when she had under her 
direction Maxine Jeanes, Chauncey 
Stewart, and Celeste Jones in Sup- 
pressed Desires, by George C. Cook 
and Susan Glaspell. 




SIIM'RES.SED DE.SIRE.S" 



c?"-^^^ J^ee ""C^^lJ^JA^i^fee ^^^^^ 



L..J¥^' 





THE WHITEHEADED BOY 



The Y.W.C.A. play, The White- 
headed Boy, was deserving of the 
praise it received m the downtown 
papers and in the Thresher, where it 
■was termed ''undoubtedly the most 
successful production ever under- 
taken by the Rice Y.W.C.A., both 
in point of attendance and quality ot 
the performance." 

The play, a three-act comedy by 
Lennox Robinson, was well staged, 
carefully directed by Mrs. C. F. 
Arrowood, and sympathetically in- 
terpreted by the cast. The care with 
which the play was worked out is 
especially to be appreciated in view 



ot its structural basis of delicate 
character delineation, familiar, un- 
strained situations, and emotional 
subtleties. 

Jack Glenn was well cast in the 
title role, and Helen Clarke, as the 
mother of the "whiteheaded boy," 
carried a heavy lead with her usual 
success. Bill Grace was good in the 
part ot an irate father. The work of 
Chauncey Stewart and of Beatrice 
Harrison was outstanding. Others 
in the cast were Sarah Waller, Flor- 
ence Brown, Donald McRoberts, 
Dorothy Seaman, Betty Moody, and 
Bsrnice Garrett. 




nrtbte tS»'2r^~lgr^^m.its>«e^iait^ 




|ili.«h 

"the' WHITEHEADED BOY" 



THE SPANISH PLAY 
The Spanish play, Rosina Es Fra- The scenes between Nancy Bridges 



gi!, by G. Martinez Sierra, was given 
by students of advanced Spanish un- 
der the direction of George Portnot. 
It was presented at 
Autry House late in 
the Spring Term, and 
''went over" very 
well tor a "language" 
play. 

The nature ot the 
play afforded many 
occasions for clever 
characterizations 
and humorous situa- 
tions, and its possi- 
bilities were, on the 
whole, well devel- 
oped by the cast. 




and Allan Dunning, as the fragile 
Rosina and her lover, and the en- 
counter of Rosina with her jealous 
rival, played by 
Margaret Wood' 
ward, were particu- 
larly good. 

The work of the 
entire cast, both in 
pronunciation and 
interpretation, was 
very creditable. 

The rest of the 
cast included Enri' 
que Longoria, Inga 
Shuppan, DeWitt 
Grossman, and Mil- 
ton Eckart. 




0v$ani5aHon$ 



nrikte t ^^r^~l8r^:mits> aviait^ 





Council 

C 



MICHAUX 




Clarence Alfred Johnson Prcsidoit 

Margaret Lester rhe Prcsidnit 

Mary Trammell Scartarx 

Sam J. WiLLLAMS, Jr Trcasunr 

Senior Representatives Sophomore Representatives 

Joseph G. Hevck Jack McDonald Ogg 

Margaret Lester Robert Loughridge 
Alice Michacx 

Innis Burford Sigler Freshman Representative 

Sam J. Williams, Jr. Harold B. Hamilton 

Junior Represeiitatives Represnitative-at-Large 

Jesse A. Madden Mar\- Trammell 

Richard R. Morris 
Brian Holden 

Since 1918, the affairs pertaining are chosen in the general election in 
to student government have been in the spring by all the students, while 
the hands of the Student Council, the others are elected by the mem- 
elected by, and representing, the bers of the various classes. The 
members of the Students' Associa- president ot the Student's Associa- 
tion. The president, vice president, tion is ex-officio the president of the 
treasurer, and Councilman-at-Large Student Council. 



cr^^^ Jj^jigi^^ "^^JT^^l^^A^i^fee *^^^^" 




ROV LiMiEL \^'EBB. 

Margaret Lester. 



, Chairman 
. Se(rcia?-\ 



Senior Representatives 
Roy Limuel Webb 
Wesley Herbert Hitsox 
Margaret Lester 
Oliver Cooper Winston 

Junior Representatives 

Harvin Cooper Moore 
Claude Taylor Fuqua 



Sophomore Representatives 
Catherine Fondren 
Thomas Perry Jackson 

Freshman Representative 
William Roy Davis 



Student honesty at Rice, as is al' 
ways more desirable, has been made 
a matter of individual choice rather 
than a thing to be enforced by out- 
side authority. The Honor Council 
is a student body elected by the 



students, which has complete super- 
vision of the enforcement of the 
principles of the Honor System. It 
is worthy of note that there has 
never been any move or desire to 
change the system. 



nrihi-e usi'g-'^ ii^M^ti'^xtiX^ 





DUPF SEC T Re AS. 



iSoman's Council 





Margaret Lester Prcsidoit 

LuRA DiFK Secniarv-Treasiivi'i 



Senior Mcinbas 

Margaret Lester 
Beatrice Harruon 

Junior Members 

Marv Louise Embry 
Irene Ward 



To promote the welfare of women 
students, control the affairs which 
are under the auspices ot the women 
students, and to represent the femi- 
nine portion of the Institute in gen- 
eral IS the function of the Woman's 
Council. The Annual May Fete and 



Sophomore Members 
Louise Rogers 
Lura Duff 

Freshmen Member 

Mary Sanford Campbell 



Member-at-Large 

Margaret Thompson 



supervision of the election of the 
best all-round co-ed are among the 
functions of the Council. The presi- 
dent and member-at-large are chosen 
by all the girls, the others by the 
various classes. Occasional co-ed mass 
meetings are called by the Council. 



G"^^ "Aiee '^C^^feti.fei^fee "^^^^ 




Oliver Winston Chairman 



REPRESENTATIVES 



South Hall: 



John Sutton 
Clyde Scott 
Rudolph Allen 



J Vest Hall: 



Richard Morris 
Charles Clark 
Ripley Hanrick 



East Hall: 

Oliver Winston- 
Holmes RiCHTER 



At the beginning of each year the 
residents of each residential hall elect 
representatives to serve on the Hall 
Committee; then, by general vote, 
a chairman, usually a Senior, is elect- 
ed. The purpose of the Hall Com- 



mittee is not to pry and prod, but 
to act as a disciplinary body m cases 
of necessity. These cases are few 
and far between, for the men at Rice 
are capable of conducting themselves 
in a manner befitting gentlemen. 



nribte t ^ '2r^~lgr^7^^1t5> .avigit^ 





M. 



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y 



NORTHRUP 



C A B 1 X K r 

MiRA Donna Ma'*' Pirsit/rnl 

Beatrice Harrison rici' Prcsidoil 

Marie Logan Secniarx 

Ethel McConnell Ti-easurer 

Helen Clarke Undtrgradiiate Representative 

COMMITTEES 

Irene Ward Program 

Rachel Waples Publicity 

Dorothy Ethel Seaman Social 

Mary Northrlp World Fellowship 

Mary Jo Inkley Music 

Mary Louise Ford Social Service 

Frances May Smith Poster 

The Young Women's Christian tute. Each year a play is given under 

Association at Rice represents the the direction of the Y.W.C.A. and 

same aims, ideals, and interests as the money used to send delegates to 

the Y.W. outside ot college life. The the Estes Park Conference, 
chief function of the group is to An active part is taken also 

further three-fold development a- in all the national student move' 

mong women students at the Insti- ments. 



cr^^^ J^iei$^ "^t^^i^jA^iu^fee ^^^^^ 



MEMBERS RICE Y. W. C. A. 



Genevieve Alpha 
Patti Jean Alsup 
Josephine Anderson 
Dorothy Ayres 
Alberta Baines 
Frieda Barboir 
Madge Barrick 
Florence Bering 
Ruth Blackwell 
Gladys Blazek. 
Katie Boxlev 
Eleanor Branch 
Nancy Bridges 
Florence Brown 
Emma Browne 
Margaret Buchanan 
Mary Elizabeth Bllbrook 
Katherine Burns 
Anne Claire Byrne 
Mary Sanford Campbell 
Natalie Carlisle 
Rhoda Carrington 
Helen Clarke 
Kathleen Collins 
Bernice Copeland 
Lee Coulter 
Lucy Davis 
Hazelle Dunlap 
Willie Mae Eaves 
Virginia Eidelbach 
Esther Ellis 
Elizabeth Ennis 
Evelyn Epley 
Jessie Farnsworth 
Catherine Fondren 
Beverly Fonville 
Dorothy Foote 
Cynthia Lee Ford 
Mary Louise Ford 
Dorothy Frazier 
Mildred Fulton 
Dora Geoppinger 



Frances Sara Cjieseke 

Elizabeth Gomperts 

Hazel Green 

Alizira Jean Gusman 

Mary Louise Hamburger 

Kathryn Hamilton 

Patricia Hamilton 

Theresa Hebel 

Avarilla Hildenbrand 

May Hickey 

Martha Frances Hill 

Marjorie Ilfrey 

Mary Jo Inkley 

Madelin Jacobe 

Annie Oma Jacobs 

Henrietta Jahnke 

Edith James 

Kathryn Jantzen 

Leola Jinks 

loNE Kidder 

Kathryn King 

Ruth King 

Virginia Landis 

Sarah Lane 

Anna Lav 

Louise Lenoir 

Margaret Lester 

Jessamine Lewis 

Marie Logan 

Clara May Matthews 

Rose Matthaei 

MiRA May 

Ethel McConnell 

Mildred McGregor 

Pauline McIntyre 

Ruth McLain 

Iris Metzler 

Lillian Merritt 

Alice Michaux 

Dora L. Montgomery 

Julia Motheral 

\'irginia Morgan 



Mary Xorthrup 

Mary Jane Parker 

Leona Pelly 

Florence Powers 

Mary Powers 

Elizabeth Reynolds 

Gene Rhodes 

Louise Rogers 

Marian Rogers 

Adele Roensch 

Ellen Ross 

Norma Runyan 

Marvel Sandel 

Arabella Scharnberg 

Martha Scott 

Carrie Seeger 

Carmen Sellers 

Marie Shaw 

ZuE Belle Shaw 

Irene Simpson 

Fleda Smith 

Flossie Smith 

Frances May Smith 

Julia Bishop Smith 

Ida South 

Lillian Spann 

Mrs. Sarah Stratford 

Annie L. Taggart 

Katherine Thompson 

Mary Trammell 

Eleanor Trotter 

Nanc\' Tucker 

Maurine Waddell 

Allene Waller 

Sarah Waller 

Rachel Waples 

Irene Ward 

Gerda Olive Watson 

Florence Watts 

Dorothy Whistler 

Zemma Womack 

Ella Frances Woodruff 

Mar^' Katherine Wright 




HFfete ^ ^r2r^~igr ^,^^ii5> avis^vdi:^ 



RALLY CLUB 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

Jack Glenn Cluiirmtin 

Hendrix Davis Vice Chainnan 

John Sitton Secretary 

LovETT Abercrombie Treasurer 

Joe Miller T. B. Stibbs Emerv Spencer 

Jake Radoff John Saint 



LovETT Abercrombie 
Rudolph Allen 
Baker Armstrong 
Ralph Bell 
Fred Benton 
Al Brashear 
Jack Bridgwater 
Lee Chatham 
Philip Cox 
Hendrix Davis 
Walker Dodson 
John Farris 
Jack Griffin 
Jack Glenn 
RiPLEV Henrick 
Don Henderson 



CHARTER MEMBERS 

Llovd Hill 
Percv Holt 
Norman Hussa 
Mercer Ingram 
Thomas Jackson 
Charles Keenan 
Roderick Kitchell 
Theo Keller 
Herman Lichte 
Patterson Lillard 
Karmon McHenrv 
Jack Major 
Lee Martin 
Franklin Miller 
Joe Miller 
Thurmond Murphy 
Erwin Nevill 



Walter Qualtrough 
Jake Radoff 
Rov Ramsey 
SuG Robertson 
John Saint 
Harry Sander 
Moses Schwartz 
Jack Shannon 
Fred Shelton 

BURFORD SiGLER 

Emery Spencer 
Theodore Stubbs 
John Sutton 
Gordon Turrentine 
Robert Turrentine 
Ernest Watson 



Similar in organization to a Ro' 
tary club, the Rally Club was con- 
ceived and established during the 
fall of '25 with a view toward creat- 
ing a closer knit student body at 
Rice, a student body that might 
work for a greater co-operation with 
Houston and the outside world. Suc- 
cess has greeted the club's first year 
of activity in striving to accomplish 
this purpose and in helping to mould 
Rice school spirit. Indications are 
that the value of the Rally Club will 
be greatly enhanced as time goes on. 
Among the most obvious activities 
of the organization during its initial 
year of existence have been the first 



annual Football Dance, honoring the 
team, the first ''Study Rally" and 
the first annual "Rice Nite." Each 
of these affairs are to be staged every 
year. In addition the Rally Club had 
charge of demonstrations at football 
games during the '25 season and 
was instrumental in inspiring ath- 
letes to apply themselves to their 
studies. Many plans for the future 
were laid during the past year, and 
the establishment of several scholar- 
ships was being planned as the year 
drew to a close. Membership in the 
Rally Club consists of fifty repre- 
sentative male students chosen by 
careful selection. 



5-"''^^ Jj^iee '^ifrw^i^iA^-Q^feig <^^^^ 




t&ll^ Cltt 



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P-'i Pw^.ATtK 



nns^et^'2.1^ (gr^:^g^its> avigtit^ 




MASTERSON 



> 



1^> 



HENDERSON 




1-' V I C K R S 

Harris Mastersox, Jr Hoiioniry Sciniary 

Bert Hitsox P-residetil 

Virgil O. Lawrexce Secretm-\ 

J. Alston Clapp, Jr. Treasurer 

CABINET 

Shirlev M. Helm Doxald \'. Henderson- William J. (jrace 

Charles H. Bell Lawrence Hamilton William 1<'. Black 

ACTIVITIES 

Pnhlication ot the Y Handbook for the Ereshmen 
College Night, September 21, 1925 
Y.M. — Y.W. Reception for New Students 
Smoker for Dormitory Men, October 30 
^ Chapel Exercises on Wednesday Mornings 

^^'eekly Cabinet Luncheons 

Series of Faculty Discussions on Wednesda\' Evenings 
Discussion Groups in the Residential Halls He'd b\' 
Harry Bone and Henry P. Van Dusen 



g^^ Aice '^^lt^^^)^i)^iu<fee "^^^^ 




THE RICE GLEE CLUB 

Miss Sallie Keith Director 

Miss Dorothy DuMars Pianist 

Miss El-genia Emrick Sponsor 

OFFICERS 

Jack Major President 

William Grace Vice President 

Charles Bell Secretary 

Dox Henderson Treasurer 

T. J. Johnson Librarian 

L. L. HiLi Publicity Manager 



PERSONNEL 
First Tenors I 

Isadore Avnet 
Clifford Berglund 
T. J. Johnson 
Milton Liljestrand 
Josiah Taylor 

Second Tenors 

Charles Bell 
Leslie Boelsche 
Lloyd Hill 
J. R. Hodges 
George King 
Herman Klumpp 
David May 
R. B. Peterson 
Donald Stl-rgis 



The Rice Trio 
Jack Major 
Don Henderson 
William Grace 



Baritones 

Theodore Blackstone 
Richard Earl 
" Edward Hertzberc ~ 
William Schwedler 
Ernest Yeatts 

Bases 

William Grace 
Don Henderson 
Virgil Lawrence 
Harry Redwine 
George Rolan 




The Night Ow/s 

Clifford Bergllnd 
Jack Major 
George King 
Dox Henderson 
W'lLLiAM Grace 
Harry Redwine 



Vke u ^ ':^ i ^ C"ta ^is?iaits> .a^iaCt^ 



THE ELIZABETH BALDWIN LITERARY SOCIETY 

This society is the oldest group of programs are given. The club is rC' 
Its type on the campus. It is named sponsible each year for some ambi- 
after the wife of the founder of the ycv^ tious project — last year the pre- 
Institute. Its aims are primarily .^q&v sentation of trophies to the foot- 
literary and at each weekly meet- "^1"^ ball team, and this year announce- 
ing, interesting and instructive y ment is made of a scholarship. 



OFFICERS 

Martha Scott Presidoit 

Marie Logan Vice President 

Clara Becker Secretarv 

Mary Trammel Treasurer 

Bernice Herbelin Member-ai-Large 



Clara Becker 
Mary L. Britto.v 
Mary S. Campbell 
Margaret Cooper 
LuRA Duff 
Norine Falligant 
Catherine Fondren 
Susie Fondren 
Beverly Fonville 
Bernice Garreit 
Francis S. Gieseke 
Mary Gohlman 
Beatrice Harrison 
Bernice Herbelin 
Martha Frances Hill 

SiSIF. IaCKSON 



MEMBERS 

Celeste Jones 
Margaret Lester 
Jessamine Lewis 
Marie Logan 
Elizabeth Masterson 
Clara May Matthews 
Mira May 
Ethel McConnell 
Eleanor Miller 
Mary Xorthrup 
Elizabeth Reynolds 
Gene Rhodes 
Louise Rogers 
Ellen Rose 
Martha Scott 
DoRorm' Spam xn 



Zue Belle Shaw 
Katrina Smith 
LuciLE Smith 
Mildred Stowe 
Margie Thiel 
Margaret Thompson 
ALary Trammell 
Nancy Tucker 
Rachel Waples 
Eleanor Wilson 
Eva Mae Wood 

Inactive Members 

\Lary Louise Hamburger 
Katherine Wood 




cT'^^ J^ji^i^^ "^Ct^^ A?iA^t>j^^^'e "^^i^ 




"IHbte u* ^ "^^^ (gl^ ti^tgi.^ .evii^vdl:^ 



PALLAS ATHENE LITERARY SOCIETY 



The Pallas Athene Literary Society 
was organized soon after the open- 
ing of the Institute tor the study ot 
literature, both ot the present and 

the past. Membership is lim- 

ited to keep the club to the ^*n* I r 
best size tor discussions and ; rf\.Lj 



comment. The weekly meetings are 
devoted to literary programs pre- 
sented by the members. Each year 
several dances and entertainments 
_ are sponsored, including the 
annual Country Fair and 
Dance, held in the Commons. 



OFFICERS 

Alice Michaux PresitienI 

M.ARG.4RET LvTTLETON Fice PvesUeftt 

M.ARG.ARET Boyd Secretary 

Pe-arl Hooker Treasurer 

Flora STREETMA>f Critic 

M.4TILDA Hood Chairiiia)i Program Comuiittec 

Marv Louise Embrv Reporter 

Marcaret Bailev Sergeant-at-.-irms 

Marjorie IL^•RE^" Coioicibnaii-at-Large 



Sarah K. Arran is 
Margaret Bailev 
Dorothv Barnes 
Ruth Blackwell 
Dorothv Boeticher 
Margaret Bovd 
Hazel Cax.van 
Helen Clarke 
Bessie Du.xn 
Marv L. Embrv 



MEMBERS 

Marv Louise Ford 
Etheldra Fralev 
Hazel Goodwin 
.^NN Hevck 
Matilda Hood 
Pearl Hooker 
Marion Hubbell 
Marjorie Ilfrev 
Mar'i' Jo Inklev 



Madelin Jacobe 
Margaret Kimball 
Margaret Lvttleton 
Marv McAshan 
Alice Michaux 
Rosalie O'Brien 
Martha Smith 
Anita Stewart 
Flora Streetman 
Mari" Elizabeth Withers 




Officers JJ^ 

^. ^ ft iM 



cr^^^ Ji^jiei^^ "^t^^i^ifei^fce ^^^^^" 




\ ^ 




nPsi-e U^T ^~f]: ■aim-IB' ■svigtit^' 




PATTERSON 



cr^-^^^ J^iee "Ut^^^^iA^t^fee ^^^^^^ 



THE ECONOMICS CLUB 



The Economics Club was organ' 
ized in 1925, by Mr. M. D. Ander- 
son, instructor in Economics, with 
the purpose of stimulating interest 
in the study ot problems m Econom- 
ics. Membership is honorary and 
limited to ten Juniors and Seniors 
who have had several courses in 
Economics and related subjects and 



who have maintained a very high 
scholastic standing at the Institute. 
The programs of the organization 
include discussions on current eco- 
nomic topics and papers read by 
members, then discussed by the club. 
Mr. Clark Warburton, of the Eco- 
nomics Department, is the faculty 
sponsor of the club for this year. 



OFFICERS 

Hen'rv Olrer Pirsidoil 

Lo\'ETT x'\bercrombie Vicc President 

HoLLis Cl-4rk. Secretary and Treasurer 

M E M B E R S 

LovETT Abercrombie 
Travis Calvin 
HoLLis Clark 
Thomas K. Dixon 
Lacoste Ellis 
DeWitt Grossman 
John T. Maginnis 
Henrv Oliver 



■ fitonomits 
Club 





TUtz t ^r^"^~l8y^:^aits> a^igit^ 




THE RICE INSTITUTE ENGINEERING SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 

Fhsl Term 

C. M. Harless PresidcJil 

Rov L. Webb Vice President 

Edward H. Austin' Secretary 

William F. Black Treasurer 

Second Term 

John S. Robertson President 

Karl K. Kreamer Vice President 

Edward H. Austin 'Secretary 

William F. Black Treasurer 



The Rice Engineering Society is 
one of the oldest organizations on 
the campus. Its purpose, as express- 
ed in its constitution, is the advance- 
ment of Engineering at the Rice In- 
stitute. This it seeks to do in various 



ways, the most ambitious of which 
IS the Biennial Engineering Show, 
held in April of alternate years. The 
show is put on entirely by students 
and has proved to be one of the most 
effective agents for advertising Rice. 





«- 










CT^'^^ Ji 


iiee '^4i!;^^ibt)i?t^)5e *^^^^ 






RICE ENGINEERING 


SOCIETY 








MEMBERS 








J. B. Alexander T. E. Hickey 


J. L. Peabody 






E. H. Austin 


Brian Holden 


J. S. Perry 






J. R. Avers 


F. G. Hollins 


Paul Perry 






j. F. Baehr 


L. R. Holloway 


E. F. Pickering 






T. A. Baker 


R. C. Hoppe 


Malcolm Riess 






H. V. Barr 


B. P. Howertox 


Egerton Roeb 






W. G. Bell 


J. H. Hunter 


M. C. Robertson 






L. S. Benbury 


William Jenkins 


J. S. Robertson 






W. F. Black 


T. J. Johnson 


F. T. RoBiDoux 






M. L. Cashion 


J. T. Judd, Jr. 


J. L. Russell 






Leo Castellanos C. G. Krause 


H. L. Sanders 






W. M. Gates 


K. K. Kreamer 


E. O. Sarratt 






W. G. Copelan'd L. Lamar 


W. J. Savage 






R. L. Grain- 


S. L. Lamkin 


G. C. Schwedler 






C. T. Crocketi 


Anna Lay 


W. M. Schwedler 






F. M. Dawson 


R. L. Lay 


B. M. Seward 






VV. E. Daniels 


M. Liljestrand 


F,. J. Shimek 






E. A. ELK.AN 


R. Livergood 


G. Shoquist 






R. H. Earl 


Tom Lochridge 


R. T. Simpson 






S. D. Ellis, Jr. 


C. R. McAfee, Jr. 


C. H. Sloan 






W. R. Feather 


G. E. McKamey 


M. R. Stallings, Jr. 






H. FouTz 


Salvador Madero 


F. J. Stancliff 






W. E. Fox 


Fred Mahaffey 


\V. D. Stine 






E. J. Fry 


W. H. Marmion 


J. H. Tabony 






L. E. Garfield 


D. M. May 


R. E. Turrentine 






R. M. Garrisw 


G. B. Miller 


T. VV. Van Cleave 






F. W. Gordon 


Sam Miron 


M. L. Van Ness 






W. J. Grace 


H. J. Moresi 


R. C. Wallis 




J. E. Gragg 


Philip Morrill 


H. R. Warrick 






Harry Grebe 


E. M. Napier 


L. C. Waterman 






R. E. Hanrick 


M. W. Neuhaus 


R. L. Webb 






C. M. Harless 


E. J. Newton 


E. G. Westheimer 






W. R. Harris 


Felix Paquin 


R. C. Wolf 






J. M. Hartsfield, Jr. L. C. Patterson 


Henry Wood 






C. E. Helmle 


F. H. Payne 


E. B. Yeatts 















Th.r^ U g'^r^-lgr^Tm.its^ aviaCt^ 




TURRENTINE 



J 



cr^^^ iJKriei^^ ''CW^i?^)^1^ige ^^^^^ 



INTERNATIONAL 
World politics, current events, 
world peace, the League of Nations, 
and many more topics come up be- 
fore this group which has discussion 
as its purpose. The membership of 
the club is limited in order to keep 
it a true discussion group, rather 
than a lecture assembly. Activities 
for the year '25''26 included three 



DISCUSSION GROUP 
banquets, one at the Brazos Court 
in November in honor of Mr. Louis 
Cazamian, visiting professor at the 
Institute, another at the Brazos Court 
in February, with Dr. Walker as the 
principal speaker, and the third at 
the Plaza Hotel in May, with Dr. 
Stockton Axson as the guest of 
honor. 



OFFICERS 

Bert Hitson Chairman 

Grant Cowles Secretary 

Roland Davenport Treasurer 

Dr. Curtis H. Walker Sponsor 

MEMBERS 
Benjamin E. Brewer Bert Hitson 

Grant Cowles Anthony Maniscalco 

J. W. Cox Burns Roensch 

Roland Davenport J. K. Schaeffer 

Charles Hamilton Dr. Curtis H. Walker 




Standing: Roensch, Maniscalco, Brewer, Cox, Hamilton, Cowles, Schaeffer. 
Sitting: Davenport, Dr. Walker, Hitson. 



nrii^e t ^~^ 1$ (gr^^s^its> a^iact^ 




g--'^^ feTee"^t?ii.^feift^iu.feie <^^^^ 



THE RICE PRE'LAW ASSOCIATION 

In accord with a long felt need at mong those intending to prepare 
Rice, a meeting was called on Da- themselves for law as a profession, 
cember 14 tor organizing a Pre-Law to give opportunity for practice in 
Club. Chief among those instrumen- debate and public speaking, and to 
tal in organizing the society was gather information concerning the 
Ernest Folk, who was unanimously various schools of law to facilitate 
elected president. The purposes and the choice of a school. These aims 
aims of the club are very inclusive, have already been practically real- 
seeking to foster a group spirit a- ized. 

OFFICERS 

Ernest Folk President 

Alfred White Vice President 

Vaughn Albertson Secretary-Treasurer 

Dallas Matthews SeTgeanl-at-.-/nns 

iM E M B E R S 

\'ai"Ghx Albertson Ernest Folk Charles Mann Ewell Strong 

Rudolph .\llen Guv H. Fox Dallas Matthews Theodore B. Stubbs 

Frank Allen Wallace Franklin Menton Murray R. Thorstenburg 

Calvin Alpha Frank H. Goodrich Harrv Painter Gordon Turrentine 

Isadore Avnet M. G. Hansbro Robert Reeves Alwvn Waller 

Cress Roy Chambers Gaylord Hart Moses Schwartz Cecil Watson 

Gerald Cornelius Shirley Helm Julian Shapiro .Alfred White 

Henry Easterling E. A. Kelly Jo Shaw Edwin Wolf 

Milton Eckert Alwyn Koehler Wii.i i \m Smii f^ 1 m k Womack 




Standing: Murray, Eckert, Shapiro, Womack, Painter, Schwartz, AUin, Thorstenburg, Hansbro . 
Sitting: Avnet, Wolf, Waller. Kneeling: White, Folk, Albertson. 



nra:enn^"^^r^~igr^^3^its> a^^it^ 







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i 






'77 /^ ^^y^ — 










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LES HIBOUX 



Les Hiboux were organized some 
years ago under the sponsorship of 
Dr. A. L. Guerard, formerly pro- 
fessor of French at the Institute, and 
other members of the French De- 
partment, with the purpose of stim- 
ulating interest in French conversa- 
tion and a better knowl- 
edge of the French lan- 
guage. The programs are 



arranged to sustain the interest ot 
the members, and to supplement, 
rather than imitate, the method in 
the class room. Membership m the 
club is limited to those who have 
had two or more years of French or 
who speak and understand French. 
The Club is allied with 
L'Alliance Francaise, 
national French club. 



the 



OFFICERS 

Don Henderson President 

Adele Roensch Vice President 

Mary Elizabeth Bulbrook. Secretary 

Thomas Spencer Treasurer 

Mary Katherine Wright Chairmayi Program Committee 



Mary Elizabeth Bulbrook 
Catherine Brooks 
Anne Claire Byrne 
LuRA Duff 
Don Henderson 
Claude Hooton 



M EMBERS 
Madelin Jacobe 
Theodore Jahn 
Ethel McConnell 
TiLLiE Pomerantz 
Walter Qualtrough 
Adele Roensch 



Fred Shelton 

Irene Simpson 

Fleda Smith 

Flossie Smith 

Thomas Spencer 

Mary Katherine Wright 




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Officers First Term 

President Wentworth Riemann 

Vice President Marion Hubbell 

Secretary Margaret Bailey 

Treasurer Arthur Reed 

MEMBERS 



Officers Second Term 
Margaret Lvttleton 
Walter Boone 
Natalie Carlisle 
Henry Oliver 



TooKER Abrahams 
Charles Aderman 
Whitfield Arrington 
William Bailev 
J. Cross Baker 
Roy Barnes 
Henry Beissner 
William Black 
Walter Boone 
James Branard 
Albert Brashear 
Leo Castellanos 
Louis Castellanos 
Edward Cook 
Philip Cox 
Graham Cull 
Roy Cullen 
Hamlet Davis 
Frank DeLange 
Charles Dorman 
Edmund Duggan 
Alan Dunning 
Thomas Ellis 
John Farris 
John Firmin 
Graham Flynn 
Claude Fuqua 
Joe Gallegly 
Lewis Garfield 
Emmett Goodrich 
Frank Goodrich 
David Grauer 
James Greenwood 
George Griffin 
Bavliss Gullette 



Derrick Hart 
Shirley Helm 
Robert Herbert 
Edward Herting 
Jack Hopkins 
Graham Kendall 
William Kendall 
Floyd King 
Hermann Klump 
Leroy Lane 
Patterson Lillard 
Ben Lindsev 
Bliss Louis 
John Maginnis 
Jack Major 
William Morrison 
Neill Masterson 
Richard Morris 
Henry Oliver 
Frank Payne 
Albert Peckham 
James Pinkerton 
Arthur Reed 
Wentworth Riemann 
Renfrow Robertson 
John Saint 
Harry Sander 
John Sheehan 
Robert Shoquist 
Allan Stevenson 
Walter Stine 
Donald Sturgis 
Robert Tallev 
William L. Tayler 
Josiah Taylor 



Gilbert Thayer 
Jack Thomson 
Halstead Warrick 
Alfred White 
Elnora Alexander 
Janet Allen 
Margaret Bailev 
Dorothy Barnes 
Elizabeth Bauer 
NLary Alice Beazley 
Dorothy Boettcher 
Frances Bruce 
Clyde Bull 
Katherine Burns 
Hazel Cannan 
Natalie Carlisle 
Kate Cox 
Lucy Davis 
Frances Desel 
Jack Dies 
Mary L. Embry 
Fredika Evershade 
Mary L. Fitch 
Archa Flagg 
Dorothy Foote 
Etheldra Fraley 
Lorene Gammill 
Edith Gard 
Frances S. Gieseke 
Mary Gohlman 
Elizabeth Gomperts 
Margaret Haggart 
Dixie Harr-is 
Marion Hubbell 
Madelin Jacobe 



Kathryn Jantzen 
Celeste Jones 
Virginia Kinard 
Kathryn King 
Anna Helen Koch 
Dorothy Kuhlmax 
Cerena Longstretch 
Margaret Lyttleton 
Ruth McCloy 
Ruth McLain 
Elizabeth Masterson 
Rose Matthaei 
Eleanor Miller 
Virginia Morgan 
Lola Parker 
Julia Pleasants 
Eva Prather 
Helen M. Radford 
Vesta Richardson 
Cherry Schwartz 
Dorothy E. Seaman 
Marie Sherwood 
Julia Smith 
Katrina Smith 
Lillian Spann 
Marian Spencer 
Anita Stewart 
Mildred Stowe 
Lois Street 
Mary Virginia Street 
Laura Tayler 
Mary Trammell 
Mary Trotter 
Nancy Tucker 
Cora Walker 



HETbte _ljr'2^i^ (gr^:^gvit5> aviait^~ 




FIRST BAPTIST RICE CLASS 

Judge Elbert Roberts Teacher 

OFFICERS 

First Term 

President Don Henderson 

ist Vice President Roland Da\ enport 

2nd Vice President Hazelle Duxlap 

yd Vice President Ethel McConnell 

Secretary Marv Katherine Wright 

Treasurer Egerton Robe 



Second Term 
Burns Roensch 
Milton McGinty 
Adele Roensch 
Mary Katherine Wright 
Ruth Polk 
Egerton Robb 



MEMBERS 



Ben H. Ammons 
Ernest R. Ammons 
Josephine Anderson 
D. Todd Briggs 
Felicia Bemus 
James Bobbitt 
Marv Chambers 
Grant Cowles 
Arlie Cassle 
F. C. Canant 
Hazelle Dunlap 
Roland Davenport 
Malrice Ewing 
Elizabeth Ennis 
Charles Filteal 
Clrtis Farrincton 



Wallace Franklin 

MURRAV GaMMELL 

Marv L. Hamburger 
Don Henderson 
Avarilla Hildebrand 
Artis Hollowav 
Alice Howard 
Sl'sie Jackson 
Edith James 
Maxine Jeans 
Stiart Lamkin 
\'irgil Lawrence 
f^lizabeth lurie 
Milton McGintv 
Helen McCullolgh 
Dorothv Metzler 



Iris Metzler 
Flovd Miller 
Isabel Morris 
WiLMiNOR Morris 
Llovd Murdock 
Herman Miller 
Harrv Painter 
Rith Polk 
Rov Ramsev 
Burns Roensch 
Adele Roensch 
Marian Rogers 
Eleanor Rogers 
William Rust, Jr. 
Egerton Robb 
Louise Rogers 



Malcolm Reiss 
Robert Reeves 
William Savage 
F'rances Mav Smith 
Richard B. Thacker 
T. W. Van Cleave 
J. S. Watt 
Irene Ward 
Marv K. Wright 
Addlean White 
Cecil Watson 
Birdie Walker 
Mi LBV Wolfe 
Marv E. Withers 
E'rnest B. Yeatts 



BAPTIST STUDENT L'NION COl'NCIL 

Irene Ward President 

Russell Feather isl Vice President 

Burns Roensch 2nd Vice President 

Helen McCullough 3rd Vice President 

Beverly Fonville Recording Secretary 



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SOUTH MAIN BAPTIST RICE CLASS 

Mr. Rex Baker Teacher 

OFFICERS 

Russell Feather President 

Anne Claire Byrne ist Vice President 

Edwin Wolf 2nd Vice President 

Lacoste Ellis yd Vice President 

Mary Virginia Jett Secretary 

Clifford Berglund Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

CORVDON AsERCROiMBIE EdwARD ElKINS EdWARD HuGHES CurTIS PatTERSON' 

LovETT Abercrombie Lacoste Ellis Marv Virginia Jett Mattie Lou Perrv 

Lois Adams S. J. Enlow Leola Jinks Elle.v Noxa Rainev 

Darrow Babcock Wilmot Everett George King K. R. Ransom 

Eugene Banta Russell Feather Rov L. Lay Harrv Redwine 

Harold V. Barr Be^'erly Fonville Milton Liljestrand Mii^e Spampinato 

Hazel Barr Russell Goldsmith Edward Little Jeff Taylor 

Mildred Barr Stephen Grant Donald MacKinnon Charles Terrence 

Byron Bassel Edwin Gragg John MacKinnon J. T. Wagoner 

Clifford Berglund J. M. Hartsfield Ethel McConnell Sarah Waller 

J. R. Binford Marshall Heard Clarence McElreath Irene Ward 

George Bloxsom Don Henderson Pauline McIntvre Harvey Wingler 

Anne Claire Byrne Joe Henderson Harold McKellar Edwin Wolf 

Robert Byrne Edward Hill Bessie Melton Russell Wolf 

Irene Davidson Martha Frances Hill Sam Merrill Henry Woods 

Kenneth Davis Troy David Hill Philip Morrill Elizabeth Workman 

John Dawson Ray Hillyer Martha Morton Wilbur Wright 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION COUNCIL— (Continued) 

Lacoste Ellis Corresponding Secretary 

Floyd Miller : Treasurer 

Marshall Heard B.Y.P.U. Enlistment Chairman 

Egerton Robb Stunt Chairman 

Addlean White Historian 



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ST. PAUL'S METHODIST RICE CLASS 

Mrs. L. M. Hoc;sett, Teacher 

OFFICERS 

Harvin C. Moore P?'esUent 

Lawrence Davis Fice President 

A>."NA \.AY Secretary 

Alton' B. Hariss Treasurer 



Raxdei.1. Alexander 
Genevieve Alpha 
Morris Appell 
Gladys Armstrong 
Florence Bering 
Louie Lee Berrv 
CoL■RTNE^' Booth 
Irvin Borders 
Elizabeth Bowles 
Loi ISE Bowser 
Eleanor Branch 
Marv Lolise BRirrc 
Brolghton Cade 
J. L Campbell 
Marv S. Campbell 
E. M. Chapman 
WiLBiR Cleaves 
Kathleen Collins 
NLavme Collins 
Kate Cox 
Mlrrv Cox 
Cii.LiNAX Cross LA NT 
Ethel Ccrrv 

ThELMA ClRRV 

J. L. Davis 



M E M 
JIi RRAV H. Davis, Jr. 
Winnie Davis 
Bernice DeYoe 

Ll RA DlFF 

Robert Elam 
Evelyn Epley 
William Farmer 
Catherine Fondren 
SisiE Fondren 
Walter Fondren 
James Foote 
Herbert E. Foltz 
Ralph W. Gemmer 
Virginia Goodman 
C. W. Hamilton 
Lawrence Hamilton 
C. M. Harless 
WiLBl R Harless 
Alton B. Harris 
.\Larvin Hirsch 
Matilda Hood 
Clalde Hooton 
Alice Hovas 
Marv Lolise Howze 
Mildred Howze 



BERS 

Pearl Hurley 
Roselle Hurley 
Marjorie Ilfrey 
Lebbeus Kemp 
William Killebrew 
Anna Lay 
Jessamine Lewis 
Mike Looby 
Thelma Mackey 
A. B. Marshall 
Clara May Matthew 
Dorothy Mobley 
Caroline Monroe 
Harvin C. Moore 
Louise Moreland 
Julia Ellen Mother/1 
Ernest Nafin 
.•\lexander Nazy 
Leila ^L•^E Owens 
Marv Jane Parker 
Raymond Powers 
Lerov B. Pool 
J. Harold Reid 
Elizabeth Reynolds 
James Robinett 



John Roos 

Mrs. J. W. Rosenbush 
B. M. Seward 
Ernest L. Shult 
LuciLE Smith 
Ida South 
Dorothy Stephens 
Charlotte Stephens 
Maude Stockard 
Mildred Stockard 
Howard Stoneham 
E. C. Strong 
.\dna Sykes 
Louise Taylor 
Neil Taylor 
Margaret Thompson 
Henry Townsend 
L. S. Vaughn 
Maurine Waddell 
.Alwyn Waller 
Roy L. Webb 
B. F. Wilkinson 
Florence Ray Wilson 
May Wilson 
Veda Wilson 



cTN^^ JSriee "Ut^^ii^uti^i^fee ^^^^ 




FIRST PRESBYTERIAN RICE CLASS 

Mr. H. W. Carothers, Teacher 

OFFICERS 

Harriet Joekel President 

Walter McKinnon Vice President 

Fay Etta Hutton Secretarv 

Martha Alderson Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Martha Alderson 
Joe B. Alexander 
Willie Bammell 
Maurine Bates 
Sam H. Bennett 
William F. Bennett 
William Berleth 
Waldo Boyles 
De la Motta Brown 
J. Alston Clapp, Jr. 
Harry Creamer 
Hilda Duke 
Milton Eckert 
Curtis Everts 



Charles H. Flato 
Donald B. Flint 
Russell Forrester 
Thomas Harpole 
Seth Hathaway 
J. H. Healey, Jr. 
Lilburne Herbst 
Fay Etta Hutton 
Harriet Joekel 
Ralph Johnson 
Violet Jones 
Sarah L. Lane 
Harry McCormick 
G. E. McKamey 



Walter McKinnon 
Clara May Matthew; 
Dallas Matthews 
Joe Maynor 
BuFORD Meredith 
Eloise Pardue 
Shannon Peterson 
Lerov Raper 
Gene Rhodes 
Norton Shafstall 
Herbert Sloan 
William Smiley 
L. .\. Stark 
Josephine Stinson 



.\. Strozier 
Hertha Stuercke 
Joseph Taylor 
Clinton Wallis 
Florence Watts 
Haley Wax 
Robert R. Webster 
John Williams 
Charles Womack 
Zemma Womack 
Katherine Woods 
Dallie Young 



The First Presbyterian Rice Class 
has had. this year the most success- 
ful year since its organization. Mr. 
H. W. Carothers, a well'known law- 
yer of Houston, keeps the class in- 
terested at all times. The purchase 
of the old Library building by the 



First Presbyterian Church has as- 
sured the class a good meeting place, 
both for the Sunday meetings and 
general gatherings. Like the other 
Sunday school classes at the Insti- 
tute, the group has religious activity 
as its purpose. 



Hflh-e t^ 'g-i^ iE^'m.KS>'^Xis.%t^~ 




(fiirls Itnnis Club 





BULBROOK 





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LOS BUHOS 

Under the sponsorship of the mem- opportunity for the improvement of 



bers of the Spanish Department, this 
new language club was formed dur- 
ing the past year. It is similar in aims 
and purpose to Les Hiboux, with 
Spanish as the center of interest in- 
stead of French. All the meetings 
are conducted in Spanish and Spanish 
conversation is carried on to give 



the members in the use of the lan- 
guage. Several short plays have been 
presented m Spanish and more are 
planned for the future. 

Occasional social meetings are 
held to stimulate the interest and 
here, too, Spanish conversation is 
always the rule. 



OFFICERS 

James A. Russell Presideyit K.atie Boxlev Secretary 

HoRTENSE Pve rice President Frank Goodrich Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Emmett Goodrich 

Frank Goodrich 

R. L. HiGGINBOTHAM 

Elizabeth Holt 

Norman Hussa 
Virginia Kinard 
Enrique Longoria 
Hortense Pye 
Freda Radoff 
Rov Ramsey 



George Appling 
C. H. Bell 
Katie Boxley 
Eleanor Branch 

Nancy Bridges 
Catherine Brooks 
Weldon Cabiness 
Laurence DaCamara 
Alan Dunning 
Marguerite Durette 



James Russell 
Inga Schuppan 
Will Rivers Smith 

SPONSORS 

Mr. Erwin Escher 
Mr. George Portnof 
Mr. Auguste Eyquem 
Mr. S. E. Moncada 







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THE RICE BAND 

Lee Chatham Director 

Maurice Ewing Pj-esident 

L. C. Watermax Secretiirv-Tri'iisiinr 

Comets Basses Clarinets 

L. C. Waterman- Walter Moore William Grace 

James Kreimever Sam Benweti- Mike Spampinato 

Joe Jarrett Robert Win'axs Charles Buhler 

Sam Sikes Wallace Franklin* 

Trombones G. B. Miller 

Maurice P^winc: French Horn R. M. Garrison 

Ewell Strong Har\tn Moore Roy Lay 

William Fields John H. Clark 

Bennett Cairns Drums Tooker Abrahams 

Lester Stancliff J. L Campbell Claude Hooton 

Henry Hoffman David May „ 

Baritones Irvin Beren Julian Shapiro 

Graves Toland Corydon Abercrombie William Jenkins 

William Bennett Edward Austin 

Piccolos 

Alto Horn Saxophones Ernest Yeatts 

Ted Stack Clarence Krause Robert Talley 

Mervin Hansbro 
Walter Fondren 

0{ all indispensable organizations alone, for on Monday and Thursday 

at Rice, the Band is perhaps the afternoons, cars line up all around 

most indispensable, chiefly because Autry House to listen. Such sue 

it is so much a part of Rice. Re- cesses as the concert at Miller Mem' 

splendent in the new uniforms and orial, the performance at Rice Night, 

greatly increased numerically, the the frequent broadcasting from KP 

Band has added much to this year. RC, are among this year's new orna- 

At the football games it is almost ments in the Band crown, 

as necessary as the team; at the bas- The thrill that comes from listen- 

ketball games it was sadly missed ing to the Band play "For Rice's 

when absent. Its practices are at' Honor," while you stand quietly, 

tended by the dorm students as if uncovered, is worth many times their 

they were concerts and they are not remuneration. 




BublicaHons 



g-^^"1l^iee '^C^^fei^^^^t^ ^^^^^ 




STUBBS BARTHELME BELLOWS 

STAFF 

T. B. Stubbs Editor 

Ben Bellows Business Managtr 

Donald Barthelme Ahmaging Editor 

JOURNALISTS 
Thomas P. Jackson Marvel Sandel Harvin Moore 

Jack Bridgwater Rachel Waples Alzira J. Gusman 

Bernard Segal John M. Fariss Evelyn Epley 

Vaughn Albertson Jack Glenn Pete Hill 

Martha Frances Hill J. C. McNeill James Porter 

LuRA Duff Gordon Turrentine Marmaduke Wiggi.esworth 

Edwin Axtell Menton Murray Dr. Theo Bald Blinkus 

Thomas Wood 
Bl'SINESS STAFF 
Sam Bennett Eugene Garrett 




cr^^^^ j^iee '^C^^^itl^'^^^'^ ^^^^^^" 




Charles L. Hairston Editor 

H. Walter Pye Busmess Manager 

Paul Hochuli Managing Editor C. E. Hooton Jrl Editor 

Alston Clapp Circulation Manager Tom Dalev Jss't .irt Editor 

' ' Thundering Down the Ages"^ 
Rice's comic was put on a sounder financial basis for the year '25-'26 by receiving 
an appropriation from the official student blanket tax. Five issues made their appear- 
ance during the OwVs fourth year of existence. Several Rice artists came to the front 
through work on the Owl this A'ear. Hooton and Daley carried on the work after Bill 
McVey left for art school. 

- 1 




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AMP/AWIL E: 



I © s e 



To create a year book that would 
be truly representative ot Rice- her 
beauty and her splendor as 
well as her student life 
was the desire of the edi- 
tors in building The i<.j2(' 
Campamle 

In striving to gratify this 
desire they did not go to 
outside sources tor inspira- 
tion; they had no cause to 
do so. Rice, beautiful, mag- 
nificent, affords through her 
very "personality" a lasting field ot 
inspiration tor her year books. 

Enormous in possibilities for deco- 
rative beauty, the Moorish side of 
the architecture was chosen and the 
book was created in a Spanish vein. 




No period restrictions were laid 
down in working out the motif, 
ideas being drawn from 
both ancient and modern 
Spanish. The result was a 
varied and interesting se- 
lection ot warm and rich 
color. 

Several new sections 
were created this year, 
among them the twenty- 
six page ''Sallyport" sec- 
tion depicting the lite ot 
the college year in pictures. 

The i()2(^ Campamle is the most 
expensive year book that has been 
produced at Rice. This is due to the 
increase in art work, photography, 
engraving and printing. 




CAMI'ANIl.K OFFICE 



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GLENN 



BRISBINE 



ABERCROMBIE 



THE STAFF 



Jack Glenn Edilor-in-Chief 

LovETT Abercrombie Business Manager 

Helen Clarke Associate Editor 

Margaret Brisbine irt Editor 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Bernard Segal Editor 

Ben Allen, Robert Goode 

UNIVERSITY 

LuRA Duff Editor 

Dorothy Ethel Seaman Assistant 



CAMPUS 

Harvin C. Moore Editor 

Don Henderson Organizations 

Marion Hubbell Society 

RiTH Blackwell Dramatics 

SPORTS 

Joseph G. Hevck Editor 

Richard Morris, Jack Bridgwater 
Herbert Sloan, William Smilev 

CONTRIBUTORS 

T. B. Stubbs, C. L. Hairston, Joel Rosen, 

R. Carmen Davis, Tom Daley 



BUSINESS ASSOCIATES 

Hendrix Davis -issistanl Business Manager 

Clarence Canterberrv, Marv Trammell, 
Clara Becker 




^TTh-e t Si -2 ig C^7m .iB> ■sv-iaii.t^ 





jL 




HILL 



TRAMMELL 



M? CONNELL 



am 



THE COED THRESHER 
Purporting "to break a three year for an excellent newspaper 



silence, the third annual Co-Ed 
Thresher made its appearance on the 
campus March fifth. Credit was due 
Miss Martha Francis Hill, the editor, 

THE "R 
Plans were being made by the 
Rally Club in the spring of '26 for 
the publication of an "R'" book. 
The book has been financed in r® 
the past by the "R" Associa- 
tion, assisted by the Alumni 
and Students' Association, and 
has been primarily of and for the 




Other 
'co-editors" were Mary Jane Tram- 
mell, business manager, Ethel Mc- 
Connell, Dorothy Ethel Seaman, 
Katherme Burns, and Betty Moody. 

'BOOK 

letter men in sports. It was the plan 
of the Rally Club to take over the 
"R" book as an annual publica- 
tion. If plans mature the scope 
of the book will be enlarged 
and efforts will be made to con- 
vert It into a strong "boosting" 
organ for the Institute. 



THE CLASS THRESHERS 
Class Threshers during the past andothers;GordonTurrentine,Soph- 



year were in the hands ot Travis 
Calvin, Senior; Harvin C. Moore, 
alias Patrick Auspacious OTevy, 
Junior, assisted by Jack Bridgwater 



omore; and Joe Bay less, Freshman. 
Some very creditable issues were 
published. The Junior Thresher was 
a parody on the modern newspaper. 









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Snih Stewart 




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CThcrrij Schwarh 




EMAra Frabij 




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sO Coach Joe Bedenk this section ot T^\\e. Caynpanile is affec- 



tionately and respectfully dedicated. 

His unflagging loyalty and energy, his entire willingness, 
and his very earnestness have won our sincere respect. 
Moreover, his clear understanding of the problems that 
confront him at Rice, and his never tailing spirit of good 



fellowship, have gained him our deep and lasting regard. 




^TTibte t^ 'i^ig (gr^7^^ ig> aviaCt^ 



THE ATHLETIC COUNCIL 




HE real name ot 
the council is 
'The Committee 
on Outdoor 
Sports." 1 1 was 
originally compos- 
ed of five members 
of the faculty. It 
has since added two alumni mem- 
bers, elected by the "R" Association. 
During the past year, '25-''26, the 
committee was incomplete, lacking 
two of the faculty members. 

The membership of the council 

JOHN W. 

FROM the point of view of lead- 
ership m football tactics and 
successful experience resulting 
from such leadership, Coach Heis- 
man is second to none in the entire 
football world. 

He began his football career as an 
end and tackle at Brown and Penn- 
sylvania Universities. He started 
coaching athletic teams at Oberlin, 
whence he went 
to Alabama Poly- 
technic Institute. 
He next coached 
at Clemson, 
where his remark- 
able success 
caused Georgia 
Tech to bid for 
his services. He 
coached here suc- 
cessfully for four- 
teen years, and 
then became head 
coach at the Uni- 
versity of Penn- 
sylvania, and 
Washington and 
Jefferson, in turn. 




consists of William 
Ward Watkin, 
chairman; H. E. 
Bray, H. K. Hum- 
phrey, LeRoy Bell, 
Albert Tomf ohrde . 
The duties of the 
committee include watkin 

the approving of schedules, passing 
on the coaches' recommendations for 
letters, certifying as to the eUgibility 
of athletes, hearing complaints and 
suggestions from the "R" Associa- 
tion, and the Students' Association. 

HEISMAN 
During his last two years at the 
latter place, he was president of the 
American Football Coaches Asso- 
ciation. 

His stay at Rice has been marked 
with signal success, probably not so 
much in games won or lost, but in 
arousing a spirit and morale among 
the athletes and student body to- 
gether, which after all is really the 
more important 
and lasting. Prob- 
ably no coach has 
ever been faced 
with such difficul- 
ties and problems 
ashasCoach 
Heisman, and his 
cheery optimism 
and doctrine of 
''everlasting 
fight" have won 
him a deep and a- 
biding place in the 
hearts of the Stu- 
dent body. His 
high principles 
and personality 
have inspired all. 




c^^^ J^Ji^e^j^^^ii^uA^t^i^i?!^ <^^^ 



TOE BEDENK 



Coach Fred Joe Bedenk comes from 
Elmira, New York; he received his 
B.A. from Penn State University. 
He was a three letter man both in 
football and baseball. During his Se- 
nior year, he was captain of the 
football team, and was a member of 
Walter Camp's All-American team. 



He has ably demonstrated his abil- 
ity at coaching, both as line coach 
in football and as varsity baseball 
coach, and his excellent work, to- 
gether with his rare tact and judg- 
ment, have given unusual satisfac- 
tion to the Athletic Officials of the 
Institute. 



ERNIE HIERTBERG 



Coach Hiertberg came to America 
from Sweden many years ago, as a 
runner for the Irish-American Ath- 
letic Club in New York, and became 
coach of this organization for ten 
years. He was later track coach at 
Columbia University, where his 
teams were practically unbeatable 
for five years. 

FRANKLIN D 

Coach Ashcraft was an athlete ot 
unusual ability in his prep school and 
college days, while at Greenville 
College, Illinois, he made a won- 
derful record in football, basketball, 
baseball, and tennis. 

As coach in every sport at Sam 
Houston Normal College, but espe- 
cially in basketball, Ashcraft achiev- 



He has been head coach of the 
American Olympic teams twice, and 
both times America was victorious. 

He has already achieved some note- 
worthy successes in Rice track ath- 
letics, due simply to his keen ability 
as a coach, and his insight into all 
forms and phases of track athletics. 

. ASHCRAFT 

ed remarkable success. He came to 
Rice in 1923,, took over the position 
of physical director, assistant varsity 
coach and scout, varsity basketball 
coach, and freshman baseball coach. 
During his three years at Rice, 
Ashcraft has organized a crack tum- 
bling team, a girls' gym class, and a 
golf team. 




Th^r^ U^''^r^~igr^7^i.its>a^iait:^ 



H. O. NICHOLAS 

Coach Nicholas 
hails from Cleve- 
land, and received 
his degree trom 
Oberlm College, 
Ohio. He played 
two years oi Var- 
sity football there. 

He first came to 
Rice in 1920, and 
coached the Fresh- 
man team of that year. He was away 
one year, and came back in 1922, 
finding time outside of his teaching 
in chemistry, to turn out a remark- 
able Freshman team. He has been ot 
inestimable value to Coach Heisman. 




R. F. HAMILL 

Mr.R.F.HamiU 
is from West Vir- 
ginia. He graduat- 
ed trom Davis- 
Elkms College in 
1916. During the 
war, he was a lieu- 
tenant in the 42nd 
Intantry. After- 
wards he returned 
to his Alma Mater, 
where he taught and coached toot- 
ball for three years, then became 
protessor ot English, and coach of 
football at GlennviUe College, and 
Fairmont Teachers College. He 
coached Slime football this year. 



STUDENT TUTORS 



ReaHzmg the very grave serious- 
ness of a situation in which, year 
after year, a great percentage of Rice's 
best and most promising athletes 
were either being dropped from the 
Institute, or were being made ineli- 
gible for par- 




ticipation in 
athletics, be- 
cause of low 
scholastic 
standing. 
Coach Heis- 
man this year 
made a care- 
ful and thor- 
ough organi- 
zation of a 
system of 
Student Tu- 
tors. 

The work was put in charge of J. 
S. Waters, and J. S. Gallegly, who 



assigned tutors to the athletes who 
needed them, saw that everything 
functioned properly, and that the 
system worked smoothly. 

Under their direction, Ike Sigler, 

Walker Dodson, and Lloyd Friedman 

helped the 



»F.R; 1,11.1. ARI) 



needy stu- 
dents in 
Math, while 
H. E. Banta 
and W. M. 
Ewing work- 
ed together 
under Si 
Watt in 
coaching 
Physics. Don 
Henderson 
represented 
the Depart- 
ment of Biology, and Pat Lillard that 
of English. 




cr^-^^ J^iee '^^t^^feitl^t^fee ^^^^^ 



THE ATHLETIC MANAGER 



William Cecil Heflin as- 
sumed the management of 
Rice athletic teams in '25- 
'26. He comes from Temple, 
Texas. He played three 
years of Varsity football, 
lettering in '22 and '24, and 
was one of the mainstays of 
the Rice line in those years. 

He knew the men's needs and did 

PUBLICITY 

One of the nu- 
merous burdens 
was taken off the 
shoulders of 
Coach Heisman 
in the provision 
for a publicity of- 
fice for athletics, 
by the Athletic Association. Jack 
Bridgwater, a Junior who has had 
considerable newspaper experience, 
was chosen to give publicity to Rice 
Athletics. 

He works in conjunction with 
Houston sports writers, and sees 
that write-ups are sent to the Asso- 
ciated Press, advertises games, etc. 




his 




his utmost to supply them. 
Moreover, it was his job to 
advertise the games, handle 
the proceeds, provide for 
the crowds, and manage the 
teams on their trips. 

"Babe" never lost his 
good humor, even when 
most rushed and flurried in 
multitudinous duties. 

DOCTOR JACK 

No one knows 
exactly when old 
"Nigger" first 
came to Rice. He 
IS almost as per- 
manent as the In- 
stitute itself. A 
Rice team with- 
out the Doctor to attend to its needs 
can hardly be imagined. Not once 
in all his many years of service to 
Rice teams, has he failed to perform 
his duties to the satisfaction of all. 

He is famous as a Don Juan, a 
man of letters, a philosopher, and 
the South's greatest authority on 
Colored Football. 





AWARD OF THE MRS. HEISMAN' "STU DENT-ATH LETE" TROPHY TO JOE HEYCK 



nPte t^^ r^~igra7m-ii?.sv-i!3i--£t^ 





RICE 



(RICEi 



BARTHELME 



CE 



THE YELL LEADERS 



^ 



Jack Glenn, Donald Barthelme and 
Norman Hussa exerted a great a- 
mount ot perfectly good energy in 
getting noise from the 
student body. 

Glenn had experi- 
ence in this, having ^ 
gone through the 
\ same gymnastics 
\ tor the two - 

g^v^precedmg 
years. Jack 
would plead, joke, yell, and raise 
hell as the occasion demanded. 



tears to the eyes of even the most 
hirsute of engineers. But the biggest 
thing that can be said to Glenn's 
credit is that he made a small bunch 
ot rooters out-yell the whole ot Texas 
University on their own tield, and 
. put up a very close match with 
' all of the cadets of A. and M. 

Barthelme began his Varsity 

"T" cheer leading at the tirst game of 

'25. "Red" demon- (^ 

strated his talent by 

leading yells and act- 



-f^ 



could entertain a mass meeting tor 
the whole ot the lunch hour by 
doing nothing more than saying noth- 
ing; he could talk seriously, however 
when seriousness was called tor ; with 
the band sottly playing "For Rice's 
Honor" behind him he could bring 



He ^lf ing a clown tor the 



I 



amusement ot spec- 
tators at the same time. 
Hussa's vigorous work 
and lusty voice made 
him invaluable atter throat tablets 
failed to restore Glenn's voice tO' 
ward the end ot a hard fought game. 



U-^ 



d 



THE FIELD HOUSE 
It IS hardly necessary to say any- beautitul buildings ot the Rice cam- 



thing about 
Rice's famous 
Field House. 
Oi compara- 
tively recent 
construction. 
Its general ar- 
chitectural de- 
sign in keeping 
with the other 




pus, its well 
planned inte- 
rior, and its ex- 
pensive equip- 
ment, make it 
the equal of any 
m the United 
States, in point 
ot beauty and 
efficiency. 



cT''''^^ lliiiee "Cw^ib^i^it^fee "^^^^ 





CHATHAM 



HENDERSON 



WATERMAN 



THE OWL BAND 



The Band this year was bigger 
and better than ever. This was Lee 
Chatham's second year as Director, 
and under his expert tutelage the 
Band fairly burst into glory. Logan 



Waterman was secretary and treas- 
urer. Maurice Ewmg was president. 
Led by Jack Henderson, the drum- 
major, the Band was a feature of 
every football game. 



THE FOOTBALL AWARDS 



Considered the most valuable man 
on the 1925 team by the vote of his 
teammates, Captain ''Heavy" Un- 
derwood received the valuable play- 
er trophy offered by George Martin 
of Ye Old College Inn. 

To inspire Rice athletes to greater 
effort in their studies, Mrs. J. W. 



Heisman established a trophy tor 
the best Varsity and Freshman stu- 
dent-athletes m football. The first of 
these awards went to Joseph G. 
Heyck, Senior student, and two year 
Varsity letter man. Aaron Berger, 
of New York City, received the 
medal for the first year men. 





UNDERWOOD 



TKr^ t^'ZW (gr^7 ^ssi.its> avigili:^ 



WEARERS OF THE "R" FOR 1925 AND 26 



Football 
Wash Underwood 
Joseph G. Hevck. 
Sam J. Williams 
Bob Loughridge 
Willie Wood Kexdrick 
William McVev 
Paul Hochuli 
Atwood Reynolds 
William Smiley 
Edward Herting 
George Murray 
Walter Joseph 
Oliver Winston 
Jack Ogg 

Ti-ack '25 
Joe Luckie 
Howard Eiser 
Jesse Madden 
William Smiley 




T( )i>iis '25 
Sam Ashe Fitch 

Cross Conntrx 
John N. Greer 

Yell leader 
Jack Glenn 



Baseball '25 
Marion Wilford 
Lindsay Hale 
Wash Underwood 
George Woods 
Bob Ables 
Paul Nash 
George Bloxsom 
Lewis D. Fisher 
Shirley DaCamara 
Dan Bloxsom 
Edward Fox 
Bob Ray 

Basketball 
Jack Hopkins 
Richard Morris 
R.<\LPH Nevinger 
Reuben Borschow 

J. T. BiLLUPS 

Henry Grant 



THE "R'' ASSOCIATION 



The work of the ''R" Association 
this year has been more active and 
more productive of results than it 
has been tor several years. 

Dudley Jarvis, as president, has 
been a most energetic and enthusias- 
tic officer, and has 
been ably assisted by 
Jesse Madden, the 
secretary. Joe Heyck 
and Sam Williams 
are the other two 
members on the ex' 
ecutive commitee of 
the Association. 

Albert Tomfoh- 
rde and LeRoy Bell 
are the Association 
representatives on 
the athletic Coun- 



This year, the As- 




DfDI.F.V JARVIS 



sociation has received permission to 
have a special seat placed on the 
football field for the use of the mem- 
bers. Besides this, it has recommend- 
ed a system for the standardizing of 
the awarding of the ''R'\ and has 
petitioned the Ath- 
letic Council tor ap- 
propriate Reserve 
letters to be given 
to athletes who rep- 
resent the Institute 
regularly, and by 
hard work on the 
field, yet do not make 
their regular letter. 

Plans for the As- 
sociation for next 
year are even more 
extensive and varied 
in activity. 



nFl^n^T"^^r^~l8r^:^aiis> .eviail!:^ 



FOOTBALL, 1925 

Kv John \V. Hkivman 




As in 1924, 
our football 
team broke ex- 
actly even on 
the '25 season. 
To the coach- 
es this wasmore 
than satisiac- 
HF.i^MAN tory, because 

the calibre ot the material was de- 
cidedly below that ot the season 
before, and there was even less of it. 
Atter a deal of desperate work on 
the part of both coaches and play- 
ers, the team managed to win the 
first two games, against Stephen F. 
Austin and Sam Houston; but it was 
plainly apparent in these contests 
that the team lacked about every 
thing -even tight, tor it was, in the 
main, composed of light, green chaps 
who had never engaged in sports 
enough to learn how to tight. In con- 
sequence, the third game, with the 
unusually powerful and well-coached 
veteranTrinityTeam,had to be chalk- 
ed up as a loss. Worst ot all, the 
team showed little improvement. 
The tourth game was our first 

Conference setto, with 

the University of Ar- 
kansas. At the end of 
the first halt, the score 
stood 9-0 against us, and 
still the tellows had not 
shown one particle of 
real knockdown and 
dragout tight. But dur- 
ing the intermission, 
somehow they came to 
life, and when they 
stepped back out upon 
the field, it was as a 




bunch ot wildcats, not kittens. That 
game finally wound up with a score 
ot 13-9 in Rice's tavor. 

The next game was with Texas, 
in Austin. At the end of the first 
halt the score was 6-6, hut it was the 
most insufferably hot day in the his- 
tory ot Texas football, and Rice had 
no more fresh men to throw in and 
take the place ot her exhausted he- 
roes; while Texas had ''a plenty" — 
so Texas won. And that's all there 
was to that. 

Then we defeated Southwestern; 
they won the championship of their 
League. Mechanically, Rice played 
an almost faultless game. Score 19-0. 
Rice lost to Louisiana State at 
Baton Rouge, through the medium 
of a marvellous 50 yard pass com- 
pleted in a driving rainstorm. Play- 
ing honors even, but score 6-0 a- 
gainst us. 

A. ^ M.'s champion team de- 
feated us. But the score was only 
3-0 against us at end of first half. 
As long as our first line-up could 
last physically, we could play them 
all to a standstill, just like the year 

before; but when we 

had to substitute, then 
we were bound to lose. 
Baylor game a tie, 6-6. 
All who saw the game 
said Rice outplayed 
them 2 to I. It was a 
marvelous exhibition a- 
against a team that had 
won the championship 
the year before. 

Rice learned to fight 
in the Arkansas game- 
6r' Rice Fight T^everDies. 



G'"'^ ^ige ''^(PWi-^lb^fe-l!^ligle ^^^^" 



n, 1 a ^ 







.M*.-^* 



v^J- 






I.i-fi III lig/i/: Back row: Asst. Coach Bedenk, Murray, Boone, McWiUiams, Prather, Reynolds, 
Winston, Madden, Calvin, McCaine, Ogg, Hoculi, Hill, S. DaCamara, Cabiness, Asst. Coach Nicholas. 

Second row: Loughridge, Appling, Kendricks, Ulrich, Underwood (Cap't), Crain, McKinnon, 
Joseph, Bell, Smiley, McWhorter. 

Bottom row: Rugely, L. DaCamara, Hopkins, Sauer, McV'ey, Matthews, Hart, Heyck. Herting, 
Painter, Coach Heisman. 



September 26 — Stephen F. Austin o; Rice jj. 
October 3 — Sam Houston Normal o; Rice 6. 
October 10 — Trinity College 13; Rice o. 
October 17 — University ot Arkansas 9; Rice 13. 
October 24 — University of Texas 27; Rice 6. 
October 31 — Southwestern University o; Rice 19. 
November 7 — Louisiana State University 6; Rice o. 
November 14 — Texas A. & M. 17; Rice o. 
November 26 — Baylor L^niversity 7; Rice 7. 



CAPTAIN ^'HEAVY" UNDERWOOD 



Probably no captain 
of a Varsity team has 
ever been up against 
such odds, and such dif' 
faculties, as was Under- 
wood, the past 1925 
football season. It would 
have been vastly differ- 
ent had he been older, 
or at least had had more 
varsity experience; but 
he wasn't, and he hadn't. 
And to top this, he was 
faced with the prospect 




of captaining a compar- 
atively weak and inex 
perienced team. But he 
came through — with an 
earnestness and dogged' 
ness surprising in one of 
his age and overcame the 
handicap of his youth. 
His brilliant playing 
made him one of the out- 
standingfiguresof south- 
western football, and 
easily gained him an All- 
Conference berth. 



^ngThue t g» TW~(E^:^^n aviait^ 



Wash "Heavy" 

Underwood 

Honey Grove, Texas 



Joseph G. Hevck 
Houston, Texas 




Stephen F. Austin — 

Rice opened her 1925 season on 
Rice Field September 26th, by 
soundly defeating Stephen F. Aus- 
tin, 33'0. 

Due to intensive and thorough 
pre'season training, the Owls were 
in splendid condition: in short, this 
IS what was responsible for the large 
score. 

The playing of the green back- 
field was a source of much gratifica- 
tion and hope to the Rice supporters, 
their steady, consistent work far sur- 
passing that of the more seasoned 
line, whose playing lacked cohesion 
and effectiveness. 



Sdtn Houston J^ortnal 



Sam Houston Normal lost 6-0, to 
Heisman-strategy and nothing else, 
in a bitterly fought game on Rice 
Field, October 3rd. They brought 
to Houston one of the best and most 
determined teams they had devel- 
oped in years. 

The Owls resorted almost wholly 
to straight offensive football, though 
It was a clever pass from Hertmg to 
Smiley, in the last quarter, that gave 
them a chance to make the only score 
of the game. 

It was again a case of steady play 
by Herting, Smiley, Murray, Ogg, 
and Capt. Underwood. 




cr^'^^ J^iee '^C^^feifeiU^tge "^^^^^ 



E. W. Herting, Jr 
Hartford, Conn. 



Oliver C. Winston 
Smithville, Texas 




Trnixty CoUege — A.r\ansa5 XJnwzrsxfj 



The Owls met their first defeat 
of the season, at the hands of the 
powerful T. I. A. A. team. Trinity 
College, October loth; the final score 
was i3'0. 

Trinity outplayed Rice in every 
department of the game. Both scores 
were made m the third quarter, one 
on a partially blocked kick, and the 
other on straight, hard football. 

Trinity played a consistent charg' 
ing game, taking advantage of every 
break, while the Rice backfield and 
line were weak and deficient in drive, 
interference, team play, and a proper 
winning spirit. 



It was not until the beginning of 
the second half, that an impotent 
Rice team began to rally, to finally 
win from Arkansas 13-9, October 
17th, on Rice Field. 

The first half was miserably played, 
but true Rice spirit and sheer fight, 
aided by a brilliant passing game, 
enabled the Owls to score in the last 
two quarters. 

It was in this last half that the 
line began to function properly the 
first time this season, inspired by the 
brilliant playing and leadership of 
Underwood, and the steady games 
of Williams, Hochuli, and Herting. 




HTfete u ^'~^r^~l8r^im.it^ .avigt ^g; 



Sam J. Williams, Jr. 
Galveston, Texas 



Paul Hochuli 
Houston, Texas 




Texas 



A brilliant Texas backtield bat- 
tered down a determined Rice de- 
fense in the second halt of the game 
in the Memorial Stadium in Austin, 
October 24th, and won 27-6. 

The Owls, primed tor a fierce and 
unequal fight, got off to a flashy 
start, scoring in the first quarter by 
fast and accurate playing. 

The day was sultry and oppres- 
sive, and Underwood and Herting 
were forced out of the game during 
the third quarter, completely pros- 
trated. It was in this third quarter 
that Texas was able to push over 
her winning touchdowns. 



It IS no excuse or apology to say 
that it was due to the heat and lack 
of any reserves, adequate or not, 
that the weaker Rice team could not 
stand the gaff, and so lost. Consid- 
ering everything. Rice played a mar- 
velously aggressive game against 
Texas' team of stars. 

The line play of both teams was 
relatively equal in point of view of 
sheer merit, and both lines played 
hard football during the whole game, 
despite the exhausting heat. Under- 
wood was easily the outstanding 
figure ot both teams on offense and 
defense, with Ptannkuche, second. 




cr^-^^^ ^ie^^^^^^fei)^ij,y:?ie ^^^^" 



WiLLTAM McVeY 

Cleveland, Ohio 



William G. Smiley 
Houston, Texas 




Southwestern 



With George Murray proving a 
superb battering ram, and with Ho- 
chuli at safety, handling the slippery 
ball with ease and precision. Rice 
skidded to a 19-0 victory over South- 
western on the slush-covered Rice 
Field, October 31st. 

Southwestern, ranked as the lead- 
ing team of the T. I. A. A., was un- 
able to get going, and made but one 
first down, and that on a penalty, 
against the machine-like play of the 
Owls, who, despite a rather weak 
kicking game, made ten first downs 
on straight, technically perfect foot- 
ball. 



The hard, low driving of the Rice 
line swept the Pirates back, and op- 
ened the way for Murray's brilliant 
line plunging. On defense, it was 
again the furious charging of the 
Rice forwards, led by Underwood, 
Heyck, Loughridge, and Joseph, that 
broke up the Southwestern plays, 
almost before they had formed. 

Rice scored once in the first quar- 
ter, and twice in the fourth, mainly 
through excellent and accurate pass- 
ing in spite of a wet and muddy ball. 
Not one play that was attempted 
failed to go, and not once did Rice 
spirit and fight lag. 




^Tlbte Ug~^i^ iEW^^P'^^ttW 



Fred A. Revnolds 
Fort Sill, Oklahoma 




Louisiana State University 



It IS hard to believe that this was 
the same Rice team that faced Texas 
and Southwestern so briUiantly the 
preceding weeks. 

Rice lost to L. S. U. 6-0 at Baton 
Rouge on November 7th, in a cu- 
riously played game, m which the 
desperate aerial attack ot the Owls 
was tar outshone by the more accu- 
rate one of the Tigers. The score 
was made in the fourth quarter on 
a 25 yard pass from Stephens to 
Haynes, who ran a remaining 20 
yards for a touchdown. The first 
half of the game was played in in- 
tense heat, the second half in a heavy 



cold downpour of rain. Rice, though 
seriously handicapped by Murray's 
injury, should have won from a 
weaker and inferior team ; that they 
didn't was due simply to poor team 
playing and neglectof opportunities; 
every man fought desperately for 
himself, and by himself. The recon- 
structed L. S. U. team was keyed 
up to a pitch of frenzy that would 
not be denied. 

Rice's best chances to score were 
all in the first half, as the Tigers 
kept the Owls continuously on the 
defensive throughout the latter part 
of the game. 




gN^^ JSriei$^ '^i(i^^li?^)^1j^fee "^^^^^ 




Texas A. & M. 



The old, old story of a smaller, 
desperately fighting team holding a 
larger, more powerful one to a small 
score, was re 'enactedNovember 14th, 
when Rice surprised Southwestern 
fans by holding the powerful fight- 
ing Aggies to a 17-0 score, on Rice 
Field. 

Wilson, Kishi, and Hunt, aided by 
the greatest line A. fer' M. has ever 
had, were unable to do more than 
score a field goal during the first 
half; but this same combination came 
back in the second period, and made 
two touchdowns, one in the third, 
and one in the fourth quarter. 



The Owls staged a game fight, but 
had many lapses into poor football. 
Only Underwood played a consist- 
ently effective game, though Hert- 
ing, Joseph, and Heyck all showed 
flashes of vigorous football against 
their superior opponents. 

To really understand the signifi- 
cance of the score, one must consider 
that it was only ten days later that 
the same Aggie team soundly de- 
feated the wonderful Texas machine 
28-0. 

Rice did the best they could a- 
gainst a much better team, and this 
is all that could be asked. 




nribte tg''2r^~tr^:w^it5>avtaCt^ 



Willie \\ . Kendrick 
Houston, Texas 



Robert F. Lolghridge 
Waco, Texas 




' Rice exhibited the best form they 
had shown this season, when they 
fought Baylor to a 7-7 standstill on 
Thanksgiving Day. 

Baylor, striving desperately to win 
one conference victory, scored on a 
beautiful pass in the fourth quarter. 
Murray drove over Rice's score by 
hard plunging, in the second quar- 
ter. During the last period. Rice 
staged a furious march up the field, 
which was terminated in the last 
few seconds, when the ball was 
passed, received, and fumbled, just 
over the Baylor goal line. 

Though Rice consistently out' 



played Baylor throughout, they 
lacked the punch at times to seize 
opportune moments of advantage. 

Rice made nine first downs to 
Baylor's five, and completed six pass- 
es against Baylor's one; moreover, 
the hghter Rice line completely out' 
fought and outcharged their heavier 
and more seasoned opponents. 

Not a man on the team but played 
above his head —Underwood, Wib 
Hams, Reynolds, Loughridge, Heyck, 
Joseph, Kendncks, McVey, Smiley, 
Ogg, Grain, Herting, Murray, Cal' 
vin, Winston, Madden, and DeCam' 
ara — all bringing a season of glorious 
fighting effort to a superb close. 




cr^^^^ MriCi^ '^t^^^^ii^'^fce ^^^^^^ 




I.ETTERMEN, 1925 



wap'^rr^?^;:*^ ff^^^-^'^' 




PRE-SEASON WORK: SHORT SPRINTS "LOOSEN 'EM UP" 




PRE-SEASON WORK: HEISMAN EXPLAINS SOME "FINER POINTS" 



nflbte t ^"^r^~lgr^^^g^its> ■avigit^ 









HEISMAN EXPLAINS A NEW IM.AV 





Ml'RRA\' IS STOi'I'KD BY ■|klNr[\' 




s 11 r BREAKS ri' f)\\'l. 'IHRISr A 1" I H E LINK 



cT'-^^ JiSri^i^ 'Ui5^^i?iA^'^fe'^ ^^^^'^ 




lERTlN'G SMASHES THROl'GH ARKANSAS LINE 




\RRANSAS GOES FOR A NICE GAIN AROUND RIGHT END 




MURRAY' I'l.rNGES SOUTHWESTERN LINE 



^Tffete U ^r^r^~lgr^7^aits> 'Oviait^ 








Mu5 



lOCHlLl CHARGES THE PIRATE LINE 




TEXAS AGGIES CAIN AKUU\DE.\D 




UNDERWOOD NAILS BAYLOR BACK 




T$a$HetbaU 



nFke 11-^ ':^i^ €^.ai!;^its>aviaTt^ 



BASKETBALL I926 




If one were 
tojudgethepast 
1926 basketball 
season by the 
number ot 
games won or 
lost, the natur- 
al conclusion 
ASHCRAFT wouU bc that 

the season had not been a success; 
indeed, it would seem to have been 
a most miserable failure. This is the 
only side the general public sees, 
and only those who have a more ex- 
tensive and deeper knowledge of the 
game as a whole, and who know 
Rice and local conditions thorough- 
ly, can well understand that such a 
supposition would be false and un- 
just to players and coach alike. But 
Rice deserves credit for pluck. 

In the first place, the squad was 
composedlargelyof Sophomores. Two 
of these had been stars m high school, 
it is true, but the gruelling exac- 
tions of a Varsity season found them 
wanting in great measure. This can 
be better understood when it is 
known that one of them has suffered 
f romappendicitis since his high school 
days, and the other had 
his leg broken m his last 
year at high school. Both 
men were considerably 
slowed down by their 
weaknesses, and never 
really played the game 
they were capable of, 
though they tried hard. 
It must be understood 
that they were among 
Rice's best. The remain- 
der of the squad, as a 
whole, was composed of [ 




good, willing, hard working boys, 
with verylittle athletic back ground. 
The system of playing that was 
taught was a short pass game. This 
system is conceded by all to be the 
most effective method of team play, 
but by far the most difficult to mast- 
er. And this young, inexperienced 
Sophomore team had to learn it, and 
learn it well enough to be expected 
to do wonders with it. 

With but one or two exceptions, 
the games were all very close, and 
every team played respected Rice as 
a dangerous and dogged rival. There 
was one record established this year, 
and that was the fact that Rice 
played the greatest number of over- 
time games ot any team in the Con- 
ference, something that is almost 
self-explanatory. 

Most of the games were played 
in the City Auditorium, which fur- 
nishes adequate seating facilities for 
the student rooting section, and for 
the spectators m general. However, 
It was somewhat of a handicap to 
the team, accustomed to practicing 
on the much smaller floor m the 
Field House. 

The team should gain 
more score -book vic- 
tories next year, as Rice 
loses only two letter 
men through gradu- 
ation. Theseare Captain 
Hopkins, and Travis 
Calvin. With a little 
help from the Fresh- 
man class, the work of 
the past year should 
bring results that will 
put Rice well up in the 
Conference race. 



cr^^^^ J^C»$^ ""CW^ibi^tJ^^gte %^^^ 




Top row: Coach Ashcratt, Applmg, Justpir, Jcii'ivina, 1.. UaCani.ua, 

Middle row: Borschow, Billups, Furman, Eckert, Pre, Robb, Denman, Townsend. 

Bottom rozu: Morns, Gammell, Nevinger, Hopkins, Hart, Grant, S. DaCamara. 



Rice 37 — Centenary 41 


Rice 24— T. C. U. 27 


Rice 22 — Centenary ^3 


Rice 21— T. C. U. 41 


Rice 22 — Texas 17 


Rice 29— A. &M. 31 


Rice 9 — Texas 27 


Rice 28— A. & M. 32 


Rice 21 — Baylor 23 


Rice K — x'^rkansas ^4 


Rice 26 — Baylor 3 1 


Rice 17 — Arkansas 2-^ 


Rice 9— S. M. U. 29 


Rice 9— S. M. U. 23 



CAPTAIN JACK HOPKINS 

The career of Captain Hopkins mg spirit. Hopkins was the fighting 
ended after three years of college leader of a fighting team. Above all 



competition. His perfor- 
mances were always of 
the finished type and 
highly inspiring to his 
teammates. In high 
school, Hopkins was the 
mainstay of his team, 
and he continued his 
good work in college. 
Throughout the South' 
west he was known not 
only for his abiHty on 
the court, but also for 
his gameness and fight- 




he was a leader of men. 
His fight in the face of 
physical disabilities that 
would discourage most 
men stamps him as a 
man of the finest type. 
His spirit and determi- 
nation always led his 
team on to greater ef- 
forts in a season of re- 
verses. 

He has surely left 
his mark on the sport 
records of Rice. 



nrfete t ^ '2r^~tr^7m.iT? aviait^ 




Richard Morris 


R 


■iLPH \eV 


SGER 


Reuben Borschow 


Houston, Texas 




Greenville 


ill. 


Houston, Texas 


PLAYER S 


A X D 


POSITIONS 


Hopkins, center 








Allin, center 


Morris, guard 








Denman, guard 


BiLLVPS, forward 








Gammell, forward 


Grant, guard 








McKiN N ON ,fo?-ward 


BoRscHow, /orawv/ 








FuRMAN, center 


"Sevinger, forward 








Jenkins, guard 


Calvin, forward 








TowNSEND, guard 


RoBBy guard 




OSEPH, ( 


enter 


F.CKERT, fo7-ivard 





J. I l;,,,., r.. Jr. 
Winters, Texas 



Henrv Grant 
Houston, Texas 



cT'^^^ Jj^ice '^1!:^^l^i)i^i^feie <^^^^^ 




Morns 

Morris was rewarded with the 
captaincy for the 1927 season. His 
value to the team is shown by his 
having played all of every Confer- 
ence game, starting at forward and 
going to guard during the season. 
His fight and determination were a 
pleasure to watch in a rather poor 
season. It was a joy to see him dive 
across the floor to get a loose ball. 
He should continue to improve next 
season and, with the prospect of a 
winning team, his play should be 
sensational. 

T^evinger 

Nevinger was the type of player 
that every coach wants to have, and 
the people like to watch, one who 
is capable of getting the last needed 
baskets at the close of the game. He 
did it. 






Borschow 
Borschow believed m team play 
and frequently passed to Nevinger 
for his long shots — a good passer, a 
good shot himself, and clever. He 
was handicapped by appendicitis. 

Billups 

Playing his first season, Billups 
did not find himself until the last 
games. A willing worker, a hard 
fighter, and young athletically, Bil- 
lups should turn out to be a really 
good player. 

Grant 

Grant was the other man to play 
all of every Conference game. Tall 
and long of arm. Grant seemed to 
pull the ball from nowhere. Despite 
the fact that he played backguard, 
he was one of the high scorers, lead- 
ing all the guards. 





^Uet^'&ig (gr^T mjgL^^:^ :^ 



THE GAMES 



The series with Centenary can 
serve as a review oi the season as a 
whole. The first game was long and 
hard fought; Rice overcame a large 
lead in the second half, only to lose 
in three overtmie periods. The team 
cracked the next game, the same sec- 
ond half fight coming too late. 

Against Texas, the team played 
their best game, winning the first in 
an extra period. Once they came 
from behind to tie the score just as 
the game ended, to win in the extra 
period. The return game was hard 
fought, but Texas was not missing 
their shots, while Rice could not 
hit theirs. 

Two closest games were played 
against Baylor. The whirlwind 
finish was more than oifset by the 
miserable play of the first halt. In the 
second game. Rice in the last half 
came from behind to get a lead, only 
to let down in the closing minutes. 

Rice put on her special A. &" M. 
fight when the Aggies were played. 
An overtime period was necessary 
when A. er' M. tied the score on a 



foul shot made in the last second of 
play. Rice lost in the overtime pe- 
riod. In the last game ot the series 
the second halt rally was killed by 
the lack of teamwork due to the in- 
dividuality ot the players. 

Then came T. C. U., Rice playing 
T. C. U. off her feet at the start of 
the first game only to wither in the 
last period. In the return game, an- 
other surprise was in store. This 
time Rice tailed to rally during the 
game, losing a poorly played contest. 

The champions trom Arkansas 
came to Houston to give a basketball 
lesson. They did, the first game. Rice 
gave them a lesson in fighting the 
second game. It seemed as though 
they did not miss a shot the first 
game, while in the second the num- 
ber of shots made was limited. 

The last series was played with 
S. M. U. Rice seemed to have lost 
all her ability in these games and ap- 
peared glad that the season was over. 
S. M. U. had a good defense and an 
offense built around two men whom 
the Owls could not handle. 




1026 LETTER ME N 




,- ■■ ~""\ i-A "1'^' 



Wk %: 



^> 



X 



I-- 



M:Ak 



]$ft$ebaU 



HTh^e u^ ':2^i^ ^£La^t^1ts>a^^igt^t^ 



BASEBALL, 1 92 5 




* Rice started 
offher 1925 base' 
ball season, as it 
seemed, towards 
a Conference 
, Championship. 
But plain hard 
. luck stepped in 
and halted the 
promising march, when both pitch- 
ers, Wood and Abies, sustained in- 
juries that kept them from the game 
for the greater part of the season. 
Wood was injured in the A. fer" M. 
game, when the score was 4-1 in 
Rice's favor. He suffered a badly 
sprained ankle, which kept him on 
the bench for several weeks. Rice 
lost this game '5:'4, in the tenth. 

Abies was lost to the team when 
he broke his arm in the first Arkan- 
sas game. Rice won the game, but 
Abies was out for the season. 

Rice began the season by winning 
the first three games in succession, 
Texas, A. &? M., and S. M. U. and 
tieing T. C. U. in an eleven inning 
game, called on account of darkness. 
Hale, the flashy catcher, broke his 
arm in the Oklahoma game, and was 
out of the last three 
games. His place was 
ably filled by "Heavy" 
Underwood, who fin- 
ished out the remainder 
of the season in fine 
shape. 

Coach Bedenk had a 
fine spirit among the 
players the whole sea- 
son. This was especially 
gratifying, for it was the 
Coach's first position as 
head coach of a Var- 




sity team, and his work was greatly 
aided by the keen, eager, and intense 
spirit of loyalty and hard, persistent, 
effort that were manifested from first 
to last by the squad as a whole. 
Besides, their work was encouraging 
m a technical way, for they contin- 
ually showed flashes of good, solid 
baseball throughout the season. This 
gave promise of results next year. 

Six of the first string men brought 
their careers in college baseball to 
a close this season. They were Cap- 
tain Wilford, Lindsay Hale, Danny 
Bloxsom, Bob Ray, Paul Nash, and 
Dallam Fisher. AH of these men 
have played three years of consist- 
ently good baseball, and Rice will 
greatly miss them. They leave a big 
gap to be filled by more or less new 
men next year, something to be think- 
ing about, for it must be considered 
that every one of these men is a 
first string player, and that all of 
their experience under a new system 
of coaching will be lost. 

Coach Bedenk again fulfilled the 
expectations of the student body in 
his work in baseball, just as he did 
in football the past season. With his 
tact, keen judgment of 
his men, his actual 
knowledge of the game, 
and his splendid person- 
ality, he gained the con- 
fidence and loyalty of 
everyone, especially his 
players. This is most 
important, for it furthers 
a hope for future sue 
cess, since the basis of 
such hope is founded on 
belief in the coach's abil- 
ity, and in himself. 



cr^^ J^7iei$^ '^4^^i?i)i^iu^^e ^^^^^" 




Top row: Waller, Ray, D. Bloxsom, Hill, Underwood, Robertson, Nash, Hanrick. 
Lower row: DaCamara, Creekmore, Wood, Hale, Wilford, G. Bloxsom, Fisher, Abies. 



March 26— Rice 6, A. & Vl. 5 
Marchji— Rice8,T. U. 3 
April 6— Rice 8, T. C. U. 8 
8— Rice 8, S. M. U. 5 
17— Rice 4, A. &M. 5 
21 — Rice 3, Texas 8 
24 — Rice 3, Bavlor 17 



April 
April 
April 
April 



April 25 — S. M. U. — rained out 

Mav I — Rice 7, Arkansas o 

Mav 2 — Rice 2, Arkansas i 

May 1 1 — Rice 6, Baylor 7 

May 15 — Rice 5, Oklahoma A. & M. 10 

May 16— Rice 2, Oklahoma A. & M. 7 

Mav 18— Rice 4, T. C. U. o 



CAPTAIN MARION WILFORD 



Captain Wilford brou 
liant and versatile coUe 
career to a close, with 
the ending of the base- 
ball season in '2?. 

Of high and firm char- 
acter, and of exceptiona 
ability as an athlete, he 
was a fitting man to cap- 
tain Varsity baseball this 
year. 

As a player, he was 
of immense value to the 
team for the whole of 
his three years' partici- 
pation, playing in any 




of the positions on the team with 
ease and confidence. He isbest known 
as a pitcher of note, 
though the most of his 
last year's playing was 
on first base. 

Dutchy has been a 
part of Rice football and 
baseball teams for three 
years, and has been a 
very valuable part at 
that; he has set up a 
high standard of effi- 
ciency in college ath- 
letics. 



^fete u '^~^r^~"lgra^i^^i^ «avigtTt^ 




George Wood 
Houston, Texas 



Robert Ables 
Toxarkana, Texas 



Marion- Wilford 
Mavtieia, Keiuuckv 



Wood 

The season of 1925 marked Wood's 
first year in college baseball. After 
the injury to Abies' arm, Wood was 
the sole reliable pitcher on the Owls' 
lineup, taking part m all but four 
of the total games. Wood also had 
a fair batting average for a member 
of the twirling staff. He gained a 
berth on the far-famed All-Confer- 
ence team. 

Abies 

Abies made an auspicious debut 
into the realm ot the college sport, 
like Wood, this season being his 
first. His goddess deserted him in 
his fourth game; during the second 
contest with Arkansas, he had his 



arm broken by a pitched ball. Abies, 
m spite of his handicap, pitched four 
remaining innings before receiving 
medical attention. 

Dd Cdinara 

Another man to begin his career 
in igi"! was Shirley Da Camara. His 
regular position was shortstop; he 
fielded well and proved to be a home- 
run king. His playing merited his 
being chosen captain of the next 
team. 

Hale 

William Lindsay Hale was one of 
the reliable men on the team, and he 
proved to be a good judge of oppos- 
ing batters as well as a batter. 




Shirley DaCamara 
Laredo, Texas 



Wll.I.IAM I.IMJSAV Ha 

Mayfickl, Kentucky 



Dan Bi.oxsom 
Houston, Texas 



g"^^ J^ee J^t^^ibjA^t^i^fce "^^^^ 




Lewis Dallam Fisher 
Houston, Texas 

D<171 BIox5om 
Dan Bloxsom was the heaviest hit- 
ter of the year and a sensational 
fielder; he also pitched in one game. 
His play on the Rice team earned 
him a berth with the Houston Buffs. 

Dallam Fisher was a dependable 
fielder and always showed up well 
at bat in a pinch. This was his last 
year. 

Paul Nash returned to play on the 
Rice team after an absence of several 
years. He was a utiUty infielder and 
a fair hitter. 



Robert Ray 
Houston, Texas 

L/iideru'ood 
"Heavy" was probably the most 
versatile man on the club, playing 
outfielder, first-baseman, and catch- 
er with equal ability. 

Robert Ray showed the same 
fighting spirit on the diamond that 
he did on the basketball court. 

George BIox5077i 
George Bloxsom's squatty build 
made him an ideal lead-off man. He 
was a good hitter. 

Vox 
Eddie Fox was undoubtedly the 
fastest man on the team, and he had 
an unusual ability for judging flies. 




Wash Underwood 
Honey Grove, Texas 



George Bloxsom 
Houston, Texas 



Eddie Fox 
Houston, Texas 



TketSt' ^i^ iE^^ ^p^^iX^ 




Texas Aggies 

The new Rice team was thorough' 
ly tried in the opening contest a- 
gainst the Aggies from College Sta- 
tion. Wood started the game but 
was relieved by Abies in the eighth. 
The Aggies started the game right 
with two runs in the tirst inning. 
It was necessary to play ten innings 
to give the victory to the Owls. 

A. and M. more than evened the 
score when the Owls met the Farm- 
ers on Kyle Field. The score itself 
was not so far against the Blue and 
Gray, but this game marked the first 
Conference loss for the men under 
Bedenk. The Aggies added a prise 
scalp to their belt when they won 
by a score of 5 to 4. 



Texas University 

The tirst victory against Texas 
was the sweetest that Wood could 
have hoped tor. The Steers used 
three pitchers to stem the hitting 
Owls, but to no avail. Williamson, 
Clements, and Cox represented Tex- 
as, while Wood pitched the full nine 
innings for Rice. In the third inning. 
Hale and DaCamara each tapped 
Williamson for home runs. Hale re- 
peated the feat in the eighth. The 
final score was 8 to 3. 

This score was exactly reversed 
three weeks later in Houston, the 
Steers taking the game 8 to 3. The 
twirling of Clements and the hitting 
of Williamson were the two main 
factors in the Texas win. 




-^■■•■'a?St; 



cr^-^^ Jto.ee 'U1:^^lb^)i^1^fee ^^^^^ 




Texas Christian University 

Feeling was high at the first game 
with T. C. U. Rice was being touted 
for the Conference championship. 
Neither Rice nor T. C. U. had lost 
a game. The game proved to be one 
of the most closely contested ever 
seen by Rice fans. For twelve in- 
nings, It see-sawed back and forth, 
and finally ended in an 8 to 8 tie. 
After knocking Fox cold, Under- 
wood made a neat peg to the home 
plate in time to save the game in the 
eleventh. Abies relieved Wood after 
six innings. In the return game, 
Wood pitched a shut-out game a- 
gainst the Christians, cheating them 
out of a Conference championship 
and winning for Rice. 



Baylor University 

Wilford started in the first game 
against the Bruins, but he was soon 
replaced by Abies. This did not stop 
the hitting, so Wood took the mound 
for the last two innings. The day 
was lost when the Bears pounded 
Wood for two doubles, a triple, and 
a homer. The final score was 17 to 3 
against Rice. Credit for the win was 
due to Red Gore's superb pitching 
for Baylor. Baylor managed to put 
over a second victory in the last 
game with the Owls. Wood pitched 
a good game up to the eighth inning 
and led the Bears all the way ; how- 
ever, he allowed two hits at a criti- 
cal time, and the score was tied. In 
the ninth Baylor scored. Score : 7 to 6. 




nrifcte tSi'2-i^ C^:^tit? avigCt^ 




Souther?! Methodist University 

Rice got but one chance at the 
crew of Methodists, since the second 
game for April 25 was rained out. 
In the first game the spirit at Rice 
was running high, and Wood and 
Abies both took part in the 8 to 5 
victory. The feature of the game 
was the long distance hitting of a 
certain Bedford of S. M. U., this 
contributing much to the interest of 
the tray. 

Arkansas University 

Arkansas journeyed down to 
Houston for a two game series with 
the Owls, who had been losing for 
the past tew games, but Wood put 



an end to the Razorbacks' hopes in 
the tirst game by a 7 to o shut-out. 
The following day Abies made a 
clean sweep of the club, winning by 
a 2 to o score. Brown of Arkansas 
also pitched great baseball. 

Oklahoma A. and M. 

The Owls' trip to Stillwater was 
very unprofitable. Not only were 
both games lost, but Hale received 
a broken arm. 

In the first game, the Sooners won 
by 10 to 5 despite Wood's homer. 
The last game went by a 10 to 2 
score, D. Bloxsom and Wilford pitch' 
mg. 





;/ Vi) 




^nribte t g» twie^^^p a^iact^ 



TRACK 1925 




Rice's "25 sea- 
son on the track 
consisted ot but 
three dual meets 
and participa' 
tion in the Con- 
ference Meet. 
With Fred 
MCHOL.MiN StancHff out tor 

the season and with but little ma- 
terial aspiring tor places on the team, 
the going was rough and the Owls 
fared badly all season. 

The burden of scoring tor Rice 
rested on the shoulders of Bill Smiley 
and Joe Luckie. 

Among the Owl track candidates 
were some men who showed excel- 
lent promise ot development, but 
one season did not allow enough 
time for sufficient progress to make 
them sure point men. 

Going to Austin for their first 
meet, the Owls received a drubbing 
at the hands of the team that later 
won the Conference championship. 
The Longhorns had things their way. 
Two weeks later at Houston the 
Owls showed unexpected strength 
against Baylor and gave the Bruins 
acloseraceforthe 
honors. 

The Texas Aggies 
came to Rice the follow- 
ing week and defeated 
the Owls by a large 
score. 

In the Conference 
M2et,held early in May, 
the Rice team took fifth 
place, topping Oklaho- 
ma A. cr' M. and Texas 
Christian University. 
High class competition 




was in evidence at this meet, nine 
conference records being broken in 
an affair hotly contested by Texas 
A. and M. and Texas University, 
with the Longhorns victors. 

The absence ot Fred Stanclitf was 
a serious handicap to the Owls. Stan- 
clitf, runner up for national honors 
in the discus throw at the Olympic 
trials, withdrew from participation 
in track activities for a season, giving 
up his captaincy in doing so. How 
ever, Fred was again chosen captain 
at the start of the '26 season. 

Coach John P. Nicholson, inter- 
nationally famous for his work on 
the track, especially in the hurdle 
races, coached the Rice team during 
the '25 season. New at Rice and 
with but a mere handful of candi- 
dates for the team, Nicholson could 
not be expected to turn out a win- 
ning group. 

At Rice Nicholson found a differ- 
ent type of athlete from that with 
which he had been working in the 
North. '"Nick" is noted for his cham- 
pionship in the high hurdles and for 
the Canadian track squads that have 
won honors under his tutelage. 

While at Rice, Nich- 
olson established the 
Southwest Relay, an 
extensive program of 
track events involving 
a multitude of famous 
athletes. Plans have 
been laid to make the 
Relays an annual affair. 
Nicholson did not re- 
turn to Rice in "26, 
being called back to the 
Montreal A. A. A. in 
Canada. 



_^^^J^iie^ '^t^^fei)^t,^fee ^<^^^ 




Tow row: Smiley, Goodrich, Madden, Coach Nicholson, Branard, Hooton, Ransom. 
Second row: Riess, Luckie, Barber, McKamey, Webb. 
Bottom row: Frazee, Eiser, Cottingham, Hannon, Crane. 

Rice 19, Te.xas University 98 
Rice 50, Baylor University 67 
Rice 21, Texas A. & M. 96 

(Rice took fifth place in the Southwest Conference Meet.) 



FRED STANCLIFF 



Fred StanclifF resigned the 
taincy of the 1925 track team 
to be eligible for com- 
petition in '26. He was 
unanimously reelected 
to lead the team in that 
year. 

Fred comes from El 
Campo, where he was a 
consistently high per- 
former. He captained the 
Freshman track team his 
first year at Rice, and , 

his fine work brought j 

him into prominence. ^ 

During the 1924 season, ^ f 



cap- 
so as 




his work was the only redeeming 
feature. After the close of school, he 
went to New Orleans 
and won first place in 
the discus throw in the 
Southern Olympic 
Trials. He lost out, how- 
ever, in the finals at Bos- 
ton, by a small margin. 
Among his records in 
the discus toss are the 
T. I. A. A. record in 
1923, the Southwestern 
Conference record in 
'24 and '26. The latter 
was in March, '26. 




Whsr^z t ^" '^ i^ C"as.i!;?ig^1tS> avt^Tdl:^ 




^•tRt]^ 




WILLIAM G. SMILEV 



II) LrCklE 



Smiley 
Bill Smiley, who had done but 
little high jumping and no broad 
jumping during his Freshman year, 
came back as a Sophomore and de- 
veloped into the best broad jumper 
and one ot the best high jumpers in 
the Southwest Conference. 

Luck^e 

Always a star dash man, Jo 

Luckie added real strength to the 

Owl track team. A series of first 

places gave him a good record. He 



is considered one of the best dash 
men in the Southwest. 

Madde?i 
The development of Jesse Mad- 
den was one of the pleasant features 
of the season for the Owls. In a 
short while, Jesse developed into a 
good half miler. 

Eiser 
Hard work put Howard Eiser to 
the front in Rice track activities. 
He succeeded in developing almost 
perfect form in the hurdles. 




JESSE MADDEN 



HOWARD EISER 



g"^^^ JKriee ^^jJT^^ibt^^iu^fee ^^^^^^ 




Texas 

In the first meet of the year, held 
at Austin, April 4, the Texas Long- 
horns smothered the Owls under a 
score of 98 to 19. 

Rice placed five times. The work 
of Smiley and Luckie brightened up 
the performance of the Rice team. 
Two firsts by Smiley and a first and a 
second by Luckie, together with a 
tie for second by Goodrich, gave the 
Owls their points. 

Smiley took first place m the high 
jump and the broad jump. Luckie 
was first in the loo-yard dash and 
second in the 220. Goodrich tied 




for second place m the high jump. 
Composed almost solely of inex- 
perienced men, the Rice team could 
hardly be expected to make any great 
impression against the seasoned 
Longhorns. 

Baylor 

The Baylor Bears found the Owls 
not such easy pluckings, and the 
green Rice group gave the Bruins a 
tough fight. The final score was 67 
to 50, with Baylor on top. This meet 
was held April 18, at Rice. Madden, 
Cottingham, Luckie, Smiley, Good- 
rich, Hannon, Morgan, Webb and 
Calvin did good work for Rice. 




Wb^^ t'^'^ 0~W^^^i^n ^va XtW 




A. and M. 

On April 25 the Texas Aggies de- 
feated the Rice group by a score of 
96 to 21. Smiley won the only un- 
contested tirst place for Rice. This 
was in the broad jump. He tied with 
Webb of the Aggies for first place 
in the high jump. Eiser won two 
second places. Luckie took a second, 
and Crane a second. 

In the 100 yard dash, Poth of A. 
and M. broke the Conference rec- 
ord, with Jo Luckie of Rice at his 
heels. Luckie's time was 9-9 10, 
which also broke the record, not, 
however, giving Jo the place. 




S. 



*1 



Conference Meet 

With the powerful Texas Long- 
horns and Aggies fighting for the 
honors of the Conference Meet at 
College Station on May 9, Rice had 
small chance for a big showing. How- 
ever, although entered in but four 
events, the Owls took fifth place. 

Smiley took first place in the broad 
jump, and tied for third place in the 
high jump; Madden took second 
place in the 880 yard run, upsetting 
the dope; and Luckie took fourth 
place in the 100 yard dash. 





:\ \ 




^H-H-l-.^^ 



TKe t @ 'a ig (Sr^T^ ssnts^ avigiH:^ 




DAIGHERTV 



THE SEASON, ^25 



Texas A. and M. felt the early 
season strength ot the Owls in April 
and dropped a dual meet at Houston 
without winning a match. 

The following Saturday at Dallas 
the Owl net men defeated S. M. U. 
four matches out of six. 

Journeying to Norman the next 
Monday, the Owls met their first 
defeat from the Oklahoma Sooners. 

At Baylor the next Saturday, a 
close meet was carried off by the 
Bruins. White and 
Daugherty of Rice won 
their matches with ease, 
taking both singles and 
doubles ; but Powers and 
Armstrong won for the 
Bears by defeating Fitch 
and Sloan. 

Rain stopped the 
match between the 
Owls and Texas Univer- 
sity in Houston the fol- 
lowing week with hon- 
ors about even. 



Sam Fitch a week later defeated 
Murray of Tulane, holder of the 
Southern Intercollegiate tennis cham- 
pionship, in a hard fought two-out- 
of -three-set match. But Tulane won 
the other two matches and carried 
off the honors. 

The Owls played their last tennis 
at the Southwest Conference tour- 
nament, held under the auspices of 
Texas Christian University at the 
Meadowmere Club in Fort Worth, 
late in May. Fitch was 
jiwg^ eliminated by Funk- 
^iS houser of Texas Univer- 
sity, after two rounds. 
Sloan was prevented 
from entering the semi- 
finals by Mather of 
Texas, doubles partner 
to the notorious Thal- 
heimer . White and 
Daugherty were elimi- 
nated by Bill Powers of 
Baylor. W. S. Vaughn 
HE FITCH coached the Owls in '25. 




G^^AiCt^ "^tsi^ii^^lbt^^^i^iige ^^^^^^ 




SAMUEL ASHE FITCH 




CLARENCE HERBERT SLOAN 




PAUL EVAN DAUGHERTV 




ALFRED T. WHITE 



TTb^e ij.^ ':2^i^ (gr«at^1t5> 'ev1 a^1l:^ 




Fitch 

Playing his fourth year tor Rice, 
Sam captained the Owls tor the 1925 
season. One of the outstanding play- 
ers of the Conference, with a true 
"Tilden" form, his ability was ah 
ways respected by his opponents. 

A driving game kept Sam forever 
on the offensive. An occasional un- 
certainty caused him to pay close 
attention to the fine points of tennis 
and made him a genuine student of 
the game. 

White 

"Shorty'' displayed excellent form 
on occasions, reaching his highest 
mark at the Conference tournament 
at Fort Worth. Here he single-hand- 
edly gave Powers and Armstrong of 
Baylor a tussle for honors in the 
second round doubles. 



Shan 

Rice's ''second strong man," Her- 
bert Sloan, was selected by his team 
mates to lead the Owls in tennis in 
1926. He decided to withdraw for a 
year, and the captaincy went to 
Edwin Beckenbach of Dallas. 

A hard driver, Sloan made his 
mark with the Owls, and his work 
leaves a strong impression, not only 
as a good thing of the past, but as a 
bright promise for the future. He 
will be at Rice two more years. 

Daugherty 
Consistency marked the play of 
Paul Daugherty. Paul was a hard 
man for his opponents at any time 
and did his best work under strong 
pressure. He did not return to Rice 
for the 1926 season. 





I: ! 




nrae t9^'^r^~igr^7m.it5»avigtct^ 




Ransom, Greer, Cottingham (Cap'tl, Coach Hiertberg, McKamey, Russell, Frazee. 

CROSS-COUNTRY 



Coach Hiertberg issued a call for 
candidates tor the cross-country team 
in September. Six men reported, and 
worked consistently and earnestly 
the rest ot the season. Oi these, only 
3 had ever participated in this branch 
ot athletics before. They were Cot- 
tingham (the captain), Ransom, and 
McKamey. The new men developed 
remarkably well and very quickly. 

The first meet held was with A. 
OS' M. in Houston, on November 14. 
The Aggies won, but not without 
a tight fight. This will be an annual 
meet, preceding the Rice-Texas Ag- 



gie football game. 

The other meet was also in Hous- 
ton, on November 21, when Rice 
played host to the teams of the South- 
west Conference. The Aggies won 
again, with Texas second, and Rice 
third. The Rice team showed to ad- 
vantage, finishing five men before 
S. M. U.'s second came home. 

Greer is the only man to letter 
in cross-country since the sport was 
organized at Rice three years ago. 
Next year's prospects seem bright, 
though the work of Captain Cotting- 
ham and King Ransom will be missed. 




cr^'^^ Jiiee "^t^^ibJA^i^fce <^^^^ 




Standing: Davis, Knippel, Purl, Calvert, Covin, C. D. Williams, Hayter, Calhoun, \olkmer, 
Schnabel, Shrader, Caldwell, Arnim, Newton, Myers. 

Kneeling: San Giovanni, Blackstone, Bennett, Sain, Merrick, Abies, Cassle, Hamilton, Masterson, 
Allnoch, Kendrick, Carmichael. 

Sitting: Powell, Rogers, R. T. Williams, Schroeder, Payne, Schoenfield, Canant, Hyde, Hill, Carpenter. 

FRESHMAN FOOTBALL, 1 92 5 



Freshman football started with a 
rush this year. The early part of the 
season was spent in hard and inten- 
sive training with the varsity, and 
in teaching the first year men the 
fundamentals of Heisman's system of 
football. A remarkable squad turned 
out and remained out the whole sea- 
son. There was weight, speed, abil- 
ity, and lots of all combined, among 
the Green Owls. Under the keen 
eye of Coach Hamill, a number of 
excellent players were brought out, 



and received their elementary train- 
ing for future Varsity careers. 

The Freshmen defeated Westmin- 
ister 13-7, and then were beaten at 
Dallas 16-0, by Terrill Prep School. 
Following this, they fought the 
Schreiner Institute on a muddy Rice 
Field to a o-o tie. Their last game 
was with South Park College, at 
Beaumont. This also resulted in a 
tie, 2-2. 

A lot depends on these men for 
Rice's success for the next few vears. 




nFireir^~^r^~@:^:^s^its» a^igttf!;^ 




FRESHMAN BASKETBALL I926 



Coach Be- 
denk took over 
the job o t 
coaching the 
Green Owl 
basketeers. 
The squad 
was not very numerous, nor was it 
any too enthusiastic. The men who 
were out, however, proved to be of 
excellent calibre, and will be of im- 
mense value to the Varsity next 
year. 

Only three scheduled games were 
played, the Freshmen defeatingSouth 



End Junior 42-18, and Quo Vadis 
21-18, and losing to Heights Senior 
High School by a small margin. Be- 
sides these games, several practice 
contests were held with local teams, 
the Freshmen winning all ot them. 

Bill Schroeder captained the Green 
Owls, and was ably backed by Long- 
cope, Smith, Rogers, Davis, Abies, 
Hyde, Masterson, Beissner, and Mc- 
Cormick. 

These men were all fast, and pos- 
sessed a good fighting spirit, besides 
knowing the game thoroughly and 
showing good sportsmanship. 



INTRAMURAL GAMES 



The South Hall "Bolsheviks" met 
and defeated the West Hall "Rats" 
7-0, in football, but their triumphant 
march toward the championship was 
halted when they were held to a 0-0 
score by the town "Riff-Raffs, " in 
a game featured by the refereeing 
for the Dorm men, and the sideline 
coaching of the townsmen. 

The Sophomores again won the 
annual IntramuralRelays,whichwere 



held this year on December 7 and 8. 
The Juniors took second place, the 
Seniors third, and the Freshmen last. 

Coach Hjertberg was an interest- 
ed spectator, and he found much 
good material for his team among the 
various contestants. 

These games are growing m im- 
portance and size every year, and 
make up a large part of College life 
at Rice. 



^'L'V^*--;^; 



4 



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\ 



•♦■ ■ 




- / 



cr-^^^^ ^iei$^ '^i{p^^lb^)b1^fee ^^^^^ 



THE SOUTHWESTERN RELAYS 



The second annual Southwest Re- 
lays were held for 1926 on March 27, 
at Rice Field. A brilliant field of 
athletes competed before the eyes of 
nearly five thousand spectators. The 
activity of about 250 entrants in the 
University class, and equally as many 
in both junior college and high school 
division, lent zest galore to the oc 
casion, and maintained a high state 
of excitement throughout the meet. 

Coming from behind by a brilliant 
final ten-yard spurt, Swinburne of 
Georgetown University beat Cuhel 
of Iowa to the tape in the mile relay, 
bringing victory to his relay team. 
This marked Iowa's first defeat this 
year, and came as a complete surprise 
to sport critics and fans. 

Captain Fred Stancliff of Rice set 
an example to his men in winning 
the discus throw. His work was 
later duplicated on the track in the 
desperate runs of Webb, Madden, 
Greer, and Weichert. Madden was 
forced to take third place in the 
mile run, by Niblick of Oklahoma 
University, but only relinguished his 
position after a keen fight. 




In the field 
events, Stan- 
cliff was first in 
the discus 
throw, making 
a mark of 136 
feet. Morgan of 
Oklahoma won 
the I'avelin toss, 
and Boettger of 
Drake came off best in the shot-put. 

Haggard of Texas won first place 
in the high jump, while Potts of 
Oklahoma won the pole vault. First 
place in the broad jump was won 
by Dowding of Georgetown. 

Considerable interest was mani- 
fested in the running of Adrian Pau- 
len, the Dutch track star. He was 
the only non-collegiate entered, but 
somewhat disappointed the crowd 
when he signed up for only the 440 
yard run. He won easily from Mc- 
Clean, Georgetown, in 493 5 seconds. 

The Haskell Indians made a splen- 
did showing, winning first places in 
two mile relay, University division, 
and half mile Senior relay, second in 
the college medley and mile relays. 




GOIN'G FOR A RECORD 



nribteU^'&ig (gr^;^s^1t?> .a^igil:^ 




The work ot the high schools was 
of excellent quality. Humble won 
the loo yard dash in lo.i seconds. 
Sunset High ot Dallas came first in 
the half-mile relay; Beaumont won 
the 220 yard low hurdles, while 
Main Avenue ot San Antonio took 
first place in the medley relay. A- 
mong other notable marks set in this 
meet, was the record of 49 feet and 
2' 2 inches made by Celaya ot 
Brownsville High School. 

Members oi the winning relay 
teams were presented with white 




gold watches. Silver & bronze med- 
als were awarded members of other 
teams. 

To Dr. Gaylord Johnson, mana- 
ger, goes a good deal of the credit 
tor the success ot the relays. Every- 
thing went otf without a hitch, and 
this counted tor a good deal in esti- 
mating the final success ot the affair. 

The showing ot the Rice Track 
men was, in the main, very pleasing 
to the students and supporters of 
the Institute. Credit is due the per- 
sistent etforts of Coach Hjertberg. 



s^*r*5W^ 




100 \ARI) DA.SH 



crs^ Ji^iee "^C^^lbiA^i^iige ^^^^^ 




INTERSCHOLASTIC RELAYS 



Forest Avenue high school of 
Dallas won the eighth annual invi- 
tation meet, held at Rice Field April 
23rd and 24th, winning four first 
and two second places in track and 
field events, also honors in the two 
relays. 

Smith viUe high school won second 
place, with Dayton high school third. 

One first, four seconds, one of 
which was a tie, and two third places 
made the record of the SmithviUe 
team. The Dayton team made three 
first places. 



The all around good work of the 
Forest Avenue team was the feature 
of the meet. 

Individual stars were Bracey of 
Humble and Harbour of Dayton. 
Bracey won the 100 and 220 yard 
dashes, and Harbour, the broad jump 
and the 440 yard run. 

A track made heavy by April 
showers slowed up the meet, ah 
though Forest Avenue came within 
two seconds of tying the national 
high school record in the half mile 
relay. 




^T RELAYS — BROAD JUMP 



HFH^e l^: ^r^~lgt a^t^it5> a^tai:t^ 




Standing: Weichert, \'esey, Perr\' (Capt.), Bi 
Sitting: Thayer, Bintord, Patout, I.iliestrami. 



rtrana, McKa 



THE TUMBLING TEAM 



The Tumbling Team was organ' 
ized three years ago by Coach Ash' 
craft. Since then, this little group 
has made remarkable progress, and 
has earned quite a name for itself 
throughout the state. 

Last year the team represented 
Rice at the First College Circus, 
held at the State Fair in Dallas. They 
won second prize for their novel and 
ingenious stunts. This year they bet' 



tered this mark at the second All 
College Circus, held again at Dallas. 
The team has performed before the 
Recreational Institute of Houston, 
in conjunction with a number of lee 
tures given by Coach Ashcraft, for 
the First M. E. Church, and at the 
May Fete this spring. 

Paul Perry, the captain and in' 
structor, has surrounded himself with 
an enthusiastic squad of men. 








GIRLS' GYM CLASS 

In the early part of the second 
semester, 65 Rice co-eds became stu- 
dents of gymnastics under the direc- 
tion of coach Ashcraft. Thirty of 
these stayed with the work until 
May 1 5 , then disbanding tor the year. 

A few hard knocks made the going 
more interesting, according to the 
more enthusiastic members of the 
class, who declare coach Ashcraft is 
establishing at Rice a real and per- 
manent system of co-ed athletics. 

Tumbling, indoor baseball, setting- 
up exercises, hurdling, are some of 
the forms of athletics prescribed. 



GOLF 

Something new in the Southwest 
Conference, golf was on the list of 
Rice athletics for the year '25-'26. 

Six men were chosen from some 
twenty prospects. They were Green- 
wood, Hancock, Scott, Branard, 
Watson, and Byrnes. These men 
were shaped into Rice's first inter- 
collegiate golf team. 

On the program was a dual meet 
with the Texas Aggies, the first of 
Its kind in the history of the South- 
west Conference. The first confer- 
ence meet for all the teams was sched- 
uled for May 21-22 in Houston. 




nribteU^'2.1^ (gr^Tm^its^ avigCt^ 



'THE FOREIGN TEAM" 



A great deal of credit and praise 
IS due to the loyal bunch of men who 
were known, during the past '2=) 
football season, as the "foreign team." 
They never received a bit of glory, 
or praise, or anything except a great 
deal of hard, painful work. 

Their job was to learn the plays 
of the teams the Varsity would play 
each week, and demonstrate their 
possibilities and worth against the 
Varsity in scrimmage. Or they might 
do nothing but serve as dummies, 
more or less, upon which the Varsi- 
ty might try their plays and forma- 
tions, m scrimmage. 

They received no trips, nor any 
awards, and their very important 
part in the molding ot the Varsity 
was hardly known to any off the 
field. Yet they came out, day after 
day, the whole season long, even 
after the Freshman season was over. 
They never complained, nor grum- 
bled, nor shirked what they consid- 
ered their duty to the school, though 
this duty was hard and often pamtul. 
Upperclassmen and Freshmen to- 
gether, theirs was an inspiring bit ot 



loyalty and devotion to the interests 
of the school. 

The work of Bennett, Rogers, Bell, 
Masterson, Painter, Allen, Merrick, 
Myers, Covin, McKinnon, Hill, and 
Williams will stand out in the re- 
cording of this year's athletics, not 
obviously, it is true, but still there, 
behind the work ot the Varsity, in 
unselfish, impersonal drudgery. 

More than this, much good tal- 
ent was uncovered which would 
otherwise have gone unnoticed. All 
of these men were fighters, and most 
of them possessed an exceptional a- 
mount of football abiHty, which was 
kept in good form and practice 
throughout the season, thus prom- 
ising Coach Heisman a few more 
men for next year's team. 

It is to be hoped that some ade- 
quate form of recognition will be 
taken ot the services of the foreign 
team in succeeding years, but at 
present the student body owes them 
a debt of gratitude tor their deep, 
quiet showing of true Rice spirit, 
and for their devoted services tor 
the betterment ot the team. 



ij^^iiiMy|^^^^^^ji^^ 



F 






^toltatk 



cT'^^^ J^iee ""^jTW^ib^A^t^fee ^.^^ 



Uht^tk 








COPVROTTED 



PRINTED BY 

l^ein, ^notD, ||ail, anlr ^leet Co. 

" Rei>i On Your Printing Is Like Limburger Oji Cheese' 

ENGRAVED AT 

JfajSfjion ^arfee 

BY THE 

WESTHEIMER COMPANY 

Engravers, Embalmers , Undertakers, Phrenologists , ajid 
Matrimonial Agents 



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ktmt^ 



"Give me liberty or give me death." 
These immortal words of Little Red 
Ridmg Hood we have taken to heart, 
and, craving one or the other, we chose 
the "liberty/' Like Steve Brodie, we are 
taking a chanct. May this volume of the 
Calomel bring to your mind in future 
years a faint inkling, a shadowy remni' 
iscence, of mornings after and nights 
before. 'Tn Hoc Signo Vmces: By This 
Sign They Whimper.'' But the carpen- 
ter does not always hit the nail on the 
cabe::a. 




cT'^^^ Mriei^^ '^^lr^^)i?i)i^i^4?f^ ^^^^'^" 







Bebication 

TO DR. THEO BALD BLINKUS 

Who has flooded the campus with wisdom from his chem tower and 
furnished Rice with platitudes, BHnkograms, and professorial dignity, this 
Eleventh Volume of the Calomel is dedicated. For his superb line of 
unadulterated and unmitigated balderdash, we envy him; for the efficient 
way in which he has controlled the destinies of our institution, we sym' 
pathise with him; and out of sheer pity for his mental deficiency and 
intellectual inferiority we offer this here dedication as the lousiest and 
most left handed compliment we could possibly deal the old gent. Allah 
be merciful! 



nrkeU^'^&ig (8r^7^ss.its> .e^igit^ 



M054ll*O^$ 



I. University 
II. Grampus 

III. Vanity for Fair 

IV. Sports 
V. Hat Rack 




©ook L timbers itp 



VIEWS 

(with Apologies to Texas University) 




ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, SHOWING CLOISTERS 



PRIVATE PROPERTY 



WMM.RiCE INSTITUTE 



I 




THE CORNERSTONE 



PHYSICS BUILDING 



nrifcte t sr^"^~lgr^^tts> lavigit^ 




^ 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



9TABLE8 




OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 





THE STADIUM 



COMMUNITY HOUSE 



cr^^^ J^i-ie^^Cj:^-^4?iA^t>i^fe^^ ^^^^ 



MUNICIPAL HOT HOUSE 

VISITORS WELCOME 
HOURS 8 PMTO 4 AM 




PROPOSED WOMEN S DORMITORY 




CAMPUS ADJOINING MESSHALL 




H p m jp 






FIELD HOUSE 



NEW ASTRONOMY LABORATORY 



nFh-et^-a i^ C^^m--|p.ss--ia€t^ 



ADMINISTRATION 




This remarkable photographic portrait ot Dr. EUgar Odeil l.ovett is here reproduced for the first 
time in the Campanile. It is a rare bird's-eye view of the great man and was procured at great risk of 
lite and limb. 

TO RICE NINETEEN TWENTY SIX 

For Rice, I am proud of your 
wealth and your vocabulary and 
your inebriateness. I rejoice in your 
vigor and your curiosity and your 
idiosyncrasies. However greatly I 
may regret the occasion, I welcome 
the opportunity of writing a tew 
words ot greeting and admonition 
to you as you pass on to the great 
workshop of the world, where each 
shall take his chamber in the silent 
halls ot endeavor. I trust that before 
entering that workshop each ot you 
shall be prepared tor the practice of 
a profession, without which Jesse 
James could never have made his 
mark in the world. When you enter 
that workshop be not like the boy 



trom El Crampo; tor there, as here, 
you will tind people with intelli- 
gence; there, as here, you will be 
called upon to tip waiters in restau- 
rants; there, as here, you will have 
to give your seat to a lady on the 
street car; there, as here, competi- 
tion will be relieved by wine, wo- 
men, and wine, and song will fill 
the air; there, as here, the Volstead 
myth will be relegated to the realm 
of Santa Glaus; there, as here, you 
will rejoice in the taste and the 
looks and the smell, and be proud 
of the weight and the shape and the 
price, ot Rice. 

Faithfully your own, 

EDDIE. 



cr'-^^3> J^ee "^JJP^^lbiA^t^fce ^^^^^ 



THE VICE INSTITOOT 

A winter resort of practical and theoretical hologna, founded on Bray''s 
Bayou by William Rice Marsh, and dedicated by hnn to the fearless and 
consistent pursuit of WINE, WOMEN, and SONG. 

OFFICERS OF THE ADMINISTRATION 




RE\'EREND 



The Right Reverend Frazier, D.D. 
(Damned Dumb), formerly chief 
night watchman, Bellaire School for 
Careless Girls; accepted job as clois' 
ter superintendent at Rice Institute 
to regain his vim and vitality; says 
his new job is just as bad on windy 
days. 

Jack Shelton, H. P. (Hot Papa), 
(San Felipe); Professor of the plain 
and fancy massage ; familiarly known 
as Nigger Jack, the boy with a 'high 
brown' in every college town in the 
South. 



Pa White, M. R. (Mail Reader); 
formerly member of the Ladies Aid 
Society and the Purity league; ex- 
pert listener-in on telephone conver- 
sations; official postcard reader; the 
man to ask when you lose the tele- 
phone number of your bootlegger 
or your chorus queen. 

Shorty Slumgullion Fc' , (Cam- 
pus Cook and Compound Cathar- 
tic) ; formerly chief hasher Ptomaine 
Joe's Stomach Pump Cafe; Professor 
of Applied Roast Beef and Mashed 
Potatoes; the man who made dior- 
rhea famous. 




Hflfcte tg»'2r^"~tr^:^^^.a^iait^ 



THE DiF FACULTY 




COU 

Leading to the Degrees of D.D. and E 

Double Meanings ioo — A care- 
ful survey of the history and con- 
versational value of the pun. Veiled 
meanings and how to veil them. 

Intoxication loo — How to keep 
from having sediment in the bottom 
of the bottles. Use of the stomach 
pump. Use of hot coffee, cold show- 
ers, tomato soup, etc., for sobering 
up. That dark brown taste and how 
to relieve it. 

Commons D.ances 200 — Who to 
call for a last minute date. (See E.B. 
L.S. page). Best methods of attract- 
ing stags when stuck with a ball and 
chain. How to bum a drink and 
where to go to hide the bottle. 



RSES 

LS. (Ditch Digger and Bond Salesman) 

Necking 100 — Advantages of va- 
rious parking places carefully re- 
viewed. Effective holds and how to 
get them. The art of osculation. 
One-arm driving and back-seat tac- 
tics as employed by masters. 

Bridge 400- How to finesse your 
partner's ace. Bum checks and how 
to collect on them. 

Social Science 2,10 — List of all 
co-eds who have cars. Debutante 
dating and how it can be managed. 
Careful study of the history of suc- 
cessful ladder men such as Ed Ar- 
rants and Ben Mitchell. 




^^_JKriei^ "^C^^fejA^i^fei^ <^^^-^" 




CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES 

Hazel Bell Can'nan Hugheston, Texas 

B.S. in Home Economics {C.I. J.), ijj6 

Martin- Hexry Lvle Cashiox Noahzarkana, Texas 

Ph.D. {Wiley College), 1066 

WiLLL-iM Cecil Heflin Pimple, Texas 

Ph.D. in Cooking {Ttiskegee histitide), 18^6 

Thomas Perry Jackson Hugheston, Texas 

LL.D. (Baylor), 634 B.C. 

Laurence Stancill Mc\\'horter Palestine, Arabia 

B.S. in Football (J. and M.) 1812 
LL.B. {Drake, Tidane, and Baylor), 186^ 

Innis Burford Sigler Crimer, Texas 

B.J'.D. (Prairie Juices), I4g2 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Graham Cracker Student 

William Russell Feather, Class 0/ 198J, of Hughestoii, Texas. 

The Cohen Ball Dullards 

Douglas Alden Buchholz, Class of iQgj, of La Sport, Texas. 
William Richard Cashion, Class of 1972, of Noahzarkana, Texas. 
Ralph Merle Comstock, Class of 1981, of El Crampo, Texas. 
Louis Lelzerich, Class of ig6y, of Hugheston, Texas. 
Thomas Austin Lochridge, Class of iQj2, of Stockridge, Texas. 
William Rake Schroeder, Class of iggg, of Malice, Texas. 

The Dull Scholars in Hiccoughs and Philanderv 

Emmett Evander Brunsoti, Class of ig6j, of Hugheston, Texas. 
John If'hitley Francisco, Class of igy6, of Malice, Texas. 
Norman Hussa, Class of ig88, of New Yoik, New Yoik. 
James Arden Still, Class of iggj, of Hugheston, Texas. 

Scholar of the Boob McNutt Widow Zander Chapter, Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Evolution 
Joseph Gabriel Pasternack, Class of i8g8, of Hugheston, Texas. 

The Yellin' Laxative Pillson Scholar 

Ernest Robert Rechel, Class of igSj, of Santone, Texas. 

The Paregoric Prize in Griping 

Jack Albert Major, Class of iggS, of Paducky, Kentucky. 



CLASSES 





r^ 




JUNIORS 



cr-'^^ J^iC^i^ '^jg^^fciA^iU-feie ^^^^ 



CLASSES— Continued 




SOPHOMORES 




FRESHMEN 



©oofe2. Grampus 



SPRING ELECTIONS 




Marked by a fierce period of cam- 
paigning and an equally fierce period 
of polling at which excitement 
reached fever heat, the annual spring 
elections as usual put fire and lite 
into school affairs. The Thresher her- 
alded the approach of the contest 
with the traditional label: "Political 
Pot Simmering/' Conflicting ele- 
ments were prevented from open 
warfare only with diificulty. Steam 
rollers were overhauled and camou- 
flaged with platform ribbons, manned 
with crews of lip service experts, 
and rolled out on the greensward 
where the hats in the ring were 
neatly blocked. Thus came in a new 
era of graft and corruption. 

The celebrated Alphonse and Gas- 
ton had nothing over the pair of 
turtledoves who aspired to the 
presidency. 



"I hope that you will wm, my 
dear Jesse." 

" I pray, my dear Jawn, that you 
are victorious." 

"Let us have a milkshake." 

"Yes, let's." 

And, gentlemen, so it goes. The 
old days of the rally and ballyhoo 
have given way to psychology and 
courteous exchanges of sweet noth- 
ings between the rival candidates. 
These latter, realizing that honors 
would be even in a mudslinging 
contest, have tactfully refrained 
from any such display of poor taste. 

Apparently it is a breach of eti- 
quette for a candidate even to want 
an office. And judging from past 
performances, those who do get 
offices don't know what to do with 
them. (Editor's note: There was dirt 
in that last remark.) 



g"^^^ "Mriee '^^S[7^^i?^)i^i\^)i?e ^^^ 



THE MAY FIGHT 



Y Tmid a sitting of baseball and 

5 I. bayou beauty, her Majesty, 

Sallie May Haughtry, was crowned 
(painlessly; see Painless Matthews 
for your dental work — adv.) Queen 
of the Bray in the (as usual) most 
beautiful May Fight that has ever 
been given at Rice or in Russia. 
"Gorgeous" and ''Beautiful" have 
not sufficient explosive value to de- 
scribe the scene. 

The gowns of the Duckesses and 
maids of humor were of brilliant 
hues, ranging in color from the sick- 
ly green of a dog fish tonsil to the 
pulsing red of an inebriate's nose. 

The Queen received her revenue 
in the pictureskew court plaster set 
among the coffee bean bushes of the 
bayou and flowers from ex-service 
men (this advertisement contributed 
by Houston's leading business men). 
Her Majesty's costume was a sheer 
negligee of mother of pearl with 
trimmings of monkey fur. The entire 
court was dressed. 

The best part of the program was 
the award of the College Woman's 




Hiccup for the best all-around girl. 
Since there were no girls worthy 
o{ the award, the hiccup went to 
Mr. William Cecil Heflin, who rich- 
ly deserved it. This is by no means 
the first hiccup Mr. Heflin has had. 
Four years of unselfish devotion to 
the girls was a good background for 
Mr. Heflin's attainment. As presi- 
dent of the E. B. L. S., devotional 
leader for the Y. W. C. A., and as a 
stewedent, Mr. Heflin has served 
Rice faithlessly and well. 




THE MAIDS OF HONOR 



HFlbte t g» '2r^'~igr^7^s^1t5> ^tgit^ 



CLASS OF ^25 ACTIVITIES 



fpRiNG activities ot the Class of 
; were tortunately brought to 
a close. Each affair was enough in 
itself, leaving the senior in a condi- 
tion similar to that of the well-known 
Humpty-Dumpty just after his fam- 
ous fall. 

First in order was the Senior Bul- 
garian, which was held in the base- 
ment of the Rice Hotel one morning 
Tno one could remember which morn- 
ing). Delicious buttermilk punch was 
served, and the room was decorated 
in a livery stable motif, in order to 
make the class president, Mr. I. 
Marion Wilford, feel at home. 

One night, as the shades were 
falling fast and street car operators 
were hurrying to the car barns, the 
Seniors held their last meeting over 
a banquet table. Dr. Lovett was in 



on the feed and spoke to the Seniors 
on the importance of each Fresh- 
man's taking physical training m the 
gym. Music was furnished by Paul 
Whiteman's orchestra, playing on 
Ape Gibbon's victrola. 

The Final Brawl consummated 
the remainder of the time before the 
Seniors should step out to take ad- 
vantage of the helpless world. Pres- 
ident Wilford, m a brand new pair 
of B. V. D.'s (over which he wore 
his pea-green suit) led the Grand 
Smirch. He was accompanied under 
protest by Miss Margaret Lester, 
who lived to spend another year at 
Rice. 

Thus closed the activities of the 
Seniors; and Dr. Lovett, with a grim 
smile, Vk'hittled another notch in his 
official belt. 




A trio of debutantes at the Final Brawl. (T^ote effect on gentleman 

to the right. ) These three tied for The Earl 

Carroll "Innocence '' prize. 



c?-^^^ J^iee ""^TW^ii^-^A^i^fee ^^^^^^ 



COMMENCEMENT 1925 



y^=NHERE were strange thoughts in 
^^ the minds of the great hood- 
winked procession that paraded 
down the walk to take the seats 
of all successful bachelors. 

On each face there was an ex- 
pression. One Senior even smiled. 
Another coughed rudely. Still an- 
other gazed into the audience at his 
best girl and almost recognized her. 

At the Baccalaureate sermon the 
Seniors learned that they were a- 
bout to step out into the world, 
where they would meet life tor the 
first time and be churned around in 
the only genuine educational insti- 
tution, the School of Hard Knocks. 
They discovered that Horatio Alger 
was right, and that, with a nickle 
and a half soled pair of shoes, they 
must pawn their gold tooth and con- 



quer the world and its inhabitants, 
never letting that upper lip get lim- 
ber tor a moment. 

These graduates were leaving Rice, 
after years of endeavor. The sun 
was blazing down. From the top of 
a distant pine tree came the hooting 
of an Owl. One Senior failed to trip 
on his gown as he ascended the 
platform, and the crowd thought 
that he had made a mistake in the 
formalities. 

Dr. Lovett shook hands one hun- 
dred and seven times, ''with all the 
rights, duties, and privileges apper- 
taining thereunto, and the Seniors 
left to get ready tor the garden 
party. 

. . . .And so another flock flew 
away from the old roost. Hoot 
mon! 



THET CALL IT COMMENCEMENT 




A,B/^R/9/f 



SoScsES.reo AS the So/vs^jfor. 
THE occftsiort . 



I I ! I: 

■ (NSTEfto OF Just 
I The Skin w/hy Not 
THE. WHOLE. Sheep T 

IT'S ttlOtte. t^ftLUABi-E. 



^ (VifiRTVf^ To The 
Ai-PHftBeTicflL er^oEK.; 
-ZIPPIE Zcppke's 

Nbmc is cskteo nT 




^HFK'^ir^'^ r^—it.aLtgia up ■es.icttrt^ 



VISITORS 



CoKiilcss Calhcaii 



A p r o m m e n t 
\' i s 1 1 o r o n the 
campus during 
the spring term 
was the Countess 
ol Cathcart. The 
famous exponent 
of 'moral turpi- 
tude' delivered 
the annual lecture 
under the Foun- 
dation for the Ad- 
\' a n c e m e n t o f 
Morals and Eti- 
quette, given to 
t h e ^^' i 1 1 i a m 
Marsh Rice Insti- 
stutebyMaxFink, 
late of Houston. 
The countess is 
the author of PiiMicity mid Hoiv to Get It, 
Xiiic yights ill a Stateroom, and of se\'eral 




ASBESTOS SLIT VVORX 

BY MALE STUDENTS 

ULRIXG VISIT OF 

I HE COlNIESs 



i_ielightful anci very illuminating articles 
in the Tyiie Confessions magazine. 

]7- Frank y orris 
Starting .April 1, J. Frank Xorris ga\-e 
a very interesting series of' lectures on the 
subject 'Tf Man Descended from a Mon- 
key, Where Is the Monkey?" .After the 
appearance of the learned Fort Worth di- 
vine, students who heard his dissertations 
had no doubt as to the location of the 
animal in question. 

Peggy Hopkins Joyee 

The return to Houston of this celebrated 
native beauty, who had ruleil the rulers of 
the earth, was heralded with ioy bv the 
most prominent specimens of the Genus 
Sheik. This Queen of Hearts succumbed 
to the charms of our campus Prides and 
the young laciy, fell in love ver\- quicklv 
with Sam Williams, Jimmy Clapp, and 
Clarence Johnson, in the onier named. 



ORGANIZATIONS 



0.//'.A..v. 

.After se\'eral months of puzzling over 
the question of finding an author with the 
initials O. W. so that the pregnant idea of 
.Adele Roensch, that the new .society or- 
ganized by the ne'er-do-wells should ha\e 
the name of O.W.I..S., the name Owen 
Wister was finally agreed upon. 

Readers of train butcher fictitjii will 
readily recall the author of The Virginians. 
When the base villian from the tall cactus 
called the man from Virginia a dirts' name, 
he bokllv ilrew his trusty six-gun with the 
now famous remark, "When vou sa\" that, 
SMILF!" 

Perhaps the incident recounted is the 
inspiration for the naming of the new 
society: "Owen Wister Literary Societ)' — 
when \ou sav that, smile — or laugh out 
loud!"' 



E.B.L.S. 

Candy, card parties and cabbages: Thus 
we have the suiTimar\' of this very active 
organization. Motto: "No girl is too home- 
ly and no social reputation is too insignifi- 
cant for our consideration." But you gotta 
hand it to 'em: the\' put the bantl on the 
map. 



P.J.L.S. 

Year's activities featured by the initia- 
tion ceremonies held at the home of Alice 
Michaux while the family were out of the 
city. Dot Boettcher caught a terrible cold 
from expo.sure and quite a riot resulted 
when several of the co-etls determineLl to 
find out what the hell hatl become of their 
step-ins. 



<^^^ J^iei^^ '^C^^ii?^fe?t>3i<iii:?e ^^^ 




SASSIETY 

"Lee had a dance one Saturday 
night. There was a big croivd of col- 
legiates — the rest were Rice students. 
Some of them danced; the rest ew 
joyed themselves. Said one little hoy 
from Kin\aid: ^'Sure is a hot dance — 

]oo}{ at that little girl smoking "' 

Mrs. Bla\e blushed. ''Dont tal}{ lil{e 
that. It sounds h\e hellV'' 



The Scullion s Ball 



By tar the most scintillating social 
event of the especially brilliant sea- 
son was "The Scullion's Hobo Hop" 
occurring on the evening of Febru- 
ary Eleventh and hanging over until 
the Twelfth of the same month. 

Taking as their motto that old 
saying of Democntus that is en- 
graved on the cornerstone ot the 
Administration Building: "On with 
the dance! Let joy be unrefined!", 
the Scullion's were the hosts at one 



of the most charming gatherings of 
the younger set that has been seen 
since the Fall of the Roman Empire 
(J. C. Gibbons, 1492). 

V V 

"The Scullion's dance was a huge 
success," 
Bawled the happy, drunken 
masses — 
"A heathen orgy," screamed the 
Dean, 
"A carnival of asses ! !" 



"I went to the PaVs Country Dance. 
I met a nice boy — a town boy — but 
he went home at nine o^cloc\. Marion 
\ept sitting on the hay. She said that 
if they raided the place she would get 
out on hale. ... I met another hoy — 
a Rice hoy, he passed out, too. That 
wasnt hayseed in Jac}{s hair; that 
was wild oats. Hazel wanted to go 
home early — I did too — I could?;': 
get any liquor either ." 




nrig^T;^" ^r^~ngr^7^?iaits> ^ts^it^ 



DRAMATICS 



aijcle Tom's Crdhbv'i\ the Dra- 
matic Club's piece de resistance 
for the i925'"26 season, was received 
by a small and unappreciative au- 
dience on April I in the Second 
Floor Inflating Room. The hall was 
attractively and appropriately dec- 
orated with festoons ot boiled hams 
strung from the ceiling. 

Ed Hertzberg in the role ot Little 
Eva was the sensation of the even- 
ing. His acting brought tears to the 
eyes of those who still held respect 
for the Thespian art. Foxy Benton, 
as Simon Legree, laid on the lash 
with the cruelty and vile oaths ex- 
pected of the character. On the 
stage he was able to turn to good 
advantage the ruthlessness and vil- 
lainousness that everyone has noted 
in his disposition m everyday Hte. 
Holmes Richter, in the title role, 
turned in a performance that was 
alternately humorous and pathetic, 
tragic and comic. 

Newspaper comments labelled the 
play ''A clever burlesque of modern 



manners." The journaHstic critics 
attributed much of the success of the 
presentation to the excellent work 
done by Jawn Sutton and Joe Miller 
as the Bloodhounds. Sam Williams, 
who had originally been cast for one 
ot the canine sleuths, was ruled out 
on account of cauliflower ears. 




^^s^HE second bill in order of un- 
V_y importance was The Tale of 
Tno Cities, with Lee Chatham play- 
ing the part ot the martyr Sidney 
Carton. He was supported by a cast 
that included the Senior Class indi- 
vidually and collectively. He acted 
with such tervour and emphasis that 
his pertormance was one ot the most 
convincing that has been seen on or 
off the stage since The Ghost of West 
Hall Tower. This three act farce 
was one ot the best ot the light plays 




Kl) HERIZBERC. AS LITTLE EV.A, SHOWING TVl'lCAL ACTIO.V 



"^^Fl^eie'^t^W^4?^)i^iu<iige ^^^^ 



DRAMATICS— Continued 




LOVE SCENE FROM 'SCRATCH MV BACK" 
XOAH WADE'S S f PER-PRODL'CTIOX 

appearing this season. The dialogue 
was especially snappy and effective 
and the consensus of opinion seems 
to be that the drama is one of the 
greatest popular successes since 
Shakespeare's Othello, the Merchant 
of Verona. 



Out For Blood furnished the mel- 
odrama for the Fall productions 
of the club. Words by John L. Sul- 
livan and music by John Philip Sousa. 

JackBurymore Womack the 
Younger took the stellar role in this 
excellent baseball drama centering 
around the ''hit and run" theme. 

The scene was laid in Austin; the 
time, fortunately in the past. 

This little playlet is unique in 
stage history, holding the record for 
a minimum of dialogue and time and 
a maximum of action. 

The versatile Mr. Womack the 



Younger carried the audience off its 
feet with the vigour and realism of 
his characterization. 

The famous mob scene rivalled 
the best ever produced by DeMille 
or William A. Brady. Mr. Womack 
gave his personal attention to the 
scene shifting and direction of the 
play. 

(One Night Only. All Return 
Engagements Cancelled. Not To Be 
Presented For Pleasure, Profit, Or 
The Hell Of It, Without Permission 
Of A. A. U.) 

(Passed by the National Board of 
Chinches, Patent Applied For, Great 
Britain Fights Deserved.) 




|(oMEWHAT off the subject of 
plays but nevertheless of a very 
dramatic flavor was the series of fiery 
orations delivered throughout the 
year by President Johnson of the 
Students Association. 




ngTbie t ^r^r^~lgr^gaits> ■e^^ite 



SALLYPORT 

Pictured hj^i-Ji^hts vi the iifc of the school year 




Air H.iiilv refuses tu nUow dorm residents to park near the mess ha 




Seed is sown for the annual Freshman Boat Ride, which is held midst a myri id of ureen 
air castles: "They also serve who only stand and wait" 



cr^^=^ J^iei^^ '^4^^4?i)i^"a,3^fe^e ^^^^^" 



©oofeS. V^^^ttg for H^tr 




'''Them Schoolgal Complex' 
ion': MISSERMYNTRUDE 
APPLEBUTTER, the clever 
male impersonator, ranks a' 
mong the loveliest of our co-eds. 
That smile that wins is due to 
a regular hinvee}{ly use of Pep- 
soco, for the tonsils. 



This charming Nfirdic blonde com- 
bines vivacity with a certain piquant 
frailty and fineness of feature to pro- 
duce that rarest wor\ of T^ature, A 
Guinea Pig without a goiter: MISS 
GOITRUDE GALLYNIPPER. 




nribte U^*:^!^ (gr^7m.iis> aviaCt^ 



VANITY FOR FAIR— Continued 




Two studies in the 
Bude that reveal what 
results may be obtained 
by careful attendance 
at Professor Ashcraft's 
Co-ed Gym Class. 

Left — THE BODY 
BRAINLESS, noted for 
throwing and springing 
— throwing the bull and 
the discus, and spring- 
ing hoary jokes. 

Right— THE VENUS 
OF THE SNOWS. This 
picture furnished by 
Mrs. E g g e r t of the 
Houston Board of Cen- 








Above — CO-ED, refusing a 
drink. "Go on, boy, don't you 
think I know 'corn' when I 
smell iti" 




Left: TRIPOD 
JESSIE, pre- 
paring to break 
training. Look 
out ladies, if 
such ye be! 



'? 



Left-BIG ED in a 
miliar pose showinpr th 
5ults obtained by the Ui 
Stretchem Lun^ Developer. 
( Advertisi 



of 







/ 



Above— SWEDE, dem- 
onstrating that famous 
Swedish folk dance, the 
Windham Wiggle. 



g"^^=^ JSriei^^ "^jfr^^ibife^iu^iige ^^i^ 



©oofe4, jglportg 




TEN NIGHTS IN THE BAWL ROOM 

^eing an Accoioit of the Throbbing Reticence of Jaivn, the Sphinx 



For fear the mimeographed copy 
may be lost, and for the benefit of 
certain unpatriotic souls, herewith is 
transcribed the speech of John IV. 
Heisman {copyright reserved) custom- 
arily delivered just before each football 
game. This is the Dormitory Meeting 
copy. For the Amphitheater or King 
James version omit all references to 
the digestive tract. 

"Fellow students — and I can say 
fellow students because I was a stu- 
dent myself once, many years ago — 
tomorrow our little team goes out 
thar on the field to meet Blank Col- 
lege. They have been training faith- 
fully, every man of them. But a game 
can't be won by the team alone; it's 
support — esprit de corps of the stu- 
dent body that counts! Are you with 
us — I say, are you with usV 

Slightly boiled stude who thinks he 
is on his way to Galveston: "Pour 
it on 'em, big boy!" 

"That's the spirit I want to see! 
What does it matter if we are out- 



weighed on the line ten pounds to the 
man, and on the bench from Mc- 
Whorter on one end to Prather on 
the other we haven't got a man who 
knows one goal from the other?! It's 
guts we need, men — intesti)ies to get 
out there behind that team and show 
them you're with them — it's entrails, 
men 

"Now, tomorrow let me see every 
last man of you out there behind that 
team till the last ball is fumbled!!!" 

At this point the band, led by 
Logan Waterman (if he is sober) will 
break into the strains of "Rice's 
Honor," the stude who thinks he 
is on the road to Galveston will break 
into tears, three Freshmen will yell 
"Hurray fer our side!" and John 
W., who used to cause tornadoes in 
Georgia, will make a graceful exit, 
leaving Lawrence McWhorter weep- 
ing in his shoes. (You'd weep, too, 
if you were head waiter and had to 
rebuild the tables after a mess hall 
pep rally.) 



HFIh^e U Sr ^r^~i8r^:^ vit5> ^tgiH:^ 



SPANISH ATHLETICS 



An old feud was renewed this sea- 
son when several stellar performers 
of the \gi^ team, notably Dot Hunt 
and Al Armstrong, transferred and 
played as 'ringers' on the Texas 
University team. 

Already famous throughout the 
Southwest for amorous proficiency 
among the student body, the Austin 
combination was well-nigh unbeat- 
able. 

Frank Goodrich proved to be the 
sensation of the 1926 season. 

Hazel Cannan, who has completetl 

BRI 

Uncle joe Bedenk estimates that 
if all the bum checks lost playing 
bridge this year could be cashed, the 
total amount would more than pay 
for all the towels stolen from the 
field house. 

Womack, who owned the only 
marked deck in the dormitories, and 
Lichte, the boy who never followed 
suit when he could renig, were recog- 
nized as the best performers in East 
Hall. 

Allan Stevenson, after studying 



four years of conference competition, 
rendered valuable assistance in tu- 
toring Freshman prospects in the 
fundamentals. 

"Our porch swing and coupe play 
improved wonderfully," Dean Cald- 
well commented at the close of the 
season. "However, after several re- 
ports of tactics used at the Scullions' 
Ball, I must remind certain over en- 
thusiastic individuals that the stran- 
gle hold is barred here in the South. 
NVe must remember our Southern 
chivalr\'." 

DGE 

Messrs. Whitehead and Work, lost 
his year's salary for grading English 
themes in three rubbers of bridge 
with Coach Bedenk for a partner. 

He was heard muttering such 
words as 'dumb bell' and 'second 
hand low' as he left the room. 

The climax of an exciting season 
came when Dub Kendrick finessed 
Heflin from the ten to the queen for 
a steak dinner at the College Inn. 
The steak must have been jaw-bone: 
Dub is still trying to collect. 




(■( r ' - 



-tU O^M Cl.AS 



I'KEI'AKINC, ru UE.VIO.S.M RAI E A.SHtKA 
•THE STEP Ol'T .STEP IN" 



sEW I LMBLINO s I L \ I, 



cr^^^^ Mriee "^^T^^l^jA^j^fee <^;^^^" 



OUR SPORTS WRITERS 

A BASEBALL GAME 



splendid stuff. The next game will be 
played on May 12, at 3:47 o'clock, 
Grand Central Time. 

As Reported by Paul Hochuli 
(of the Press) 
The Rice Institute Owls showed 
their guts shrdlu Wednesday, 13 to 

o. Woods, Abies, Comstock, etc. 

.00348. DaCamara — .01234; Com- 
stock .0000000! Tolle 874532945- 

67 ? Bedenk said on the train to San 
Antonio i234i;678998765432i, but 
there is still hope for the struggling 
birds as long as they keep on up at 
the batting average. Pitching excel- 
lent — next time. Two weeks ago 'i-^, 
one week ago, 7-6. Ten years ago 
14 — 34. Doubtful if they ever do. 

And why not a new gymnasium 
for the basketball men? 
the score of 62 to 62 '< in favor ot 
the Owls, making the fifth consecu- As Reported by Jack Bridgwater {of 
tive loss for it in a row alltogether. the Athletic Ass' it Publicity Bureau) 

As Reported by Kern Tips 

{of the Chronicle) 

In one of the heaviest downpours 

of the past thirty-five years the two 

teams met on the diamond. During 1 ^ 

the first inning the precipitation a- / ' 

mounted to more than five inches. <^ ' ui^ '"'lllli^N 

The second frame was not so bad, '^ ' "— ^ \WK^^ 

only 43^ inches coming down on the '-^ / r q ^ "\, 

struggling teams. zT^^^ J^ ^ — ^(^/^ /. •] 

Both teams were present on the « ^^ \\ | l^\ ^^/A C 
field, each aggregation consisting ot u^JSv -i^ uXl''' ' 
nine men. The resplendent uniforms 
of the northerners were doubtless 
beautiful but nevertheless got drench- ~T^ 

ed in rain. It was an uphill fight all ^a. ^,^'' 

the way and they showed some X^ 



As Reported by Gordon Turrentine 
{of the Post-Dispatch) 

Decemero bingled out a single, 
marking up the first tally for the 
Bedenkmen by bringing in Llnder- 
would. This was a sweet bit of clout- 
ing on the part of the Owlets' bench- 
man. Next up was Grandpappie 
Woords, the heaver of the Institute. 
The first ball tossed across the home 
plate was missed by the close margin 
of eight feet, but on the fifth strike, 
he rapped the pill for a goal and got 
two bags on the slap, getting put out 
by the catcher, however, halfway be- 
tween home and first base. Lindoubt- 
edly Grandpappie is the strongest 
batter on the Institoot squad. 

By a brilliant rally in the ninth 
half of the last ending the visitors 
lost the game, thereby winning by 




PROPOSED CHANGES AND ADDITIONS FOR THE 
BEAUTIFICATION OF THE RICE CAMPUS 

Pictured h^ Bernard Segal 




Why not build a Campanile as is a Campanile? 
Whoever said the old Greek bell tower should be con- 
verted into a smokestack anyway? 
With a little figgerin' by William 
Wart Watkin and a small purchase 
at Kress' (Political adv.) the pres- 
ent Campanile could be made to 
appear as here shown. 

In the interest of better appe- 
tites, this interesting portrait should 
take the place of that of the group 
of f(juni_lered cattle that now hangs 
in the Senior mess hall. Calves are 
more inspiring than cows any old 
day. 





This remarkable picture of 
Lee Chatham should hang in 
the closet of the band room 
for the purpose of inspiring 
the brass moths not to chew 
on the horns (affording in 
itself a more suitable object 
for chewing.) 




In memory of K d w a r d 
Doublegut Hertzberg, F.dgar 
Monke\gland Altenburg, and 
Michael Macaroni Spampi- 
nato(God bless them !)this ap- 
propriate monument should 
be placed on the campus. 



G-^^ M^ti-igig '^{^gii-^feitp-aat-fe'g "^^^ 



J JIIS INTEiJESJimioOBSBWEiM^ 




^S2^ 



■Eo Wertzberg } 



\<> LO-alNG H»S ftPPETlTE- 
1 - -^ 



— 'Morbid (^AX" 

COMSTOCK. Mfites 
SCONDRL TKlftLS... 








— Uncle Joe 

pNTriusiasric piBouT r«e 
SCL;LLIOf>»S 6ftLL - 




l-T. BflYrop 

STUBBS Hfts ^eVEK 
Been in Love .. 



LoveTTAseflCRomfiiE 
Never? cft>-i-s on 

-THE PROPS. 




— SERNftRO Segal. 

^ 




— HEAOU/ftlTER. McWHO(?.TER ^SlPtU HRIRSTON ANO 
NEVE*^ EMPHAS/IES HA2EL CANAION NEVEI^ 

MESS HflLL DRESS SPERK To G«cH C>THEI^ 



HTke t g" g;gi;C g^^sss.i^ a^igtct^ 



THE OWL CLASSIFIED 



WANTED: A JOB 




Joe Gabriel Pasterxack. 

Having conquered all the unconquer- 
able, learned all the unknowable, solved 
all the unsolvable, made finite all the in- 
finite, I now find myself out of work. I am 
now searching for a new field in which I 
have not worked (as there is nothing more 
to be done in any of the many fieitis of 
my endeavor and accomplishment). It any- 
one has any difficult problems or even any 
menial labor regarding any of the follow- 
ing subjects I should advise them to end 
their quest for knowledge by calling on 
me; I am thoroughly competent in biology, 
agronomy, eudiometry, astronomy, organ- 
ic chemistry, horticulture, embryology, 
geography, arithmetic, psycho-analysis, 
etymology, French, the tonsorial arts, al- 
gebra, civil, mechanical and electrical en- 
gineering, architecture, spelling, calculus, 
theology, marbles, German, inorganic 
chemistry, horseshoeing, business admin- 
istration, agriculture, music, geology, phren- 
ology, singing, finance, explosives, Greek, 



physiology, psychology, naental telepathy, 
medicine, economics, English, French, 
Spanish, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, etc., liter- 
ature, military tactics, chiropody, naviga- 
tion, evangelism, entomology, genetics, ar- 
chaeology, and (last but by far not the 
least) the Analyzation of Self!) 

Anv additional information will be cheer- 
fully given. JOE PJSTERNJCK, Jssist- 
ivil (ic-Iux(\ Rice histitiitc, Honsimi, Texas. 



LOST: A REGAL CROWN 




— Destined to be 
mine on lMa\- 1, 
192B. Promised me 
by the dormitory 
residents of South 
Hall and strongly 
urged tor me by the 
male population ot 
the Rice Institute. 
Lost in the choice 
of the Woman's Council, who overlooked 
my athletic prowess and tour years work 
on the track in the name of dear ole Rice 
as well as the immense social popularity 
I have enjoyed and my evenness ot temper 
in praising the work of John W. Heisman 
and in striving to abolish track athletics 
at the Institute. "There ain't no Justice!" 

LIONEL STRONGFORT 
COTTINGHAM, 

Alias T\' Cobb, the Sp/iiiix 
of South Hall 



Wanted : Excuse for Living 



Must be emphatic and convincing e- 
nough to apply to the likes oij. C. Prather 
and must comply in every respect with 
the rules of the Associated Humane Socie- 
ties ot America. Report to the Harris County 
Humane Society and Association for the 
Protectio7t and Justification oj the Rights of 
Dumb Animals. 



<r-^^ JKriCt^ "^Jt^^^feiA^ij^fce "^^^ 










llrte loeoL of T»e SxooeNr of 
Business AomiNiSTRf>T(ois DuRinG 

ONE OF JoHNNie (^cCflNTS' 



The lOEfiL OF 




^TTfete t ^"Z (gr^7^s^its> a^iait^ 




iT LAST A ISE HAS BEEN FOUND FOR A PROF'S LECTURE 



Life's Little Jokes 




, Ai ;'>r:*-; ,.s*'-^*»^>» 



^ 1^^ j^ 




Numbers 1492 and 1776 



No. fo6 



g^^^^^^^^iee '^Cw^ibit^t^i^t?^ ^^^^^^ 



BUe HOUSE FABL! 

TEN VOLUMES OF RICELQRE -AFTER THE mW.^/OEBECK 



UPJTHlRf -He's BfEN H«M6IN6 

ARoomoWhe shli.ypoi?t All 

AM flf?IV\ OFF EVERYBODY 
iri fteftCri 



Vol.1 



^>Hdi4^ 




I^URE JPAJSeO-flLL'ONES-'-WHY 

JSTuOyf-j: come here to PuftY 

— '-^ ' Football -Rice OuiEs rti6 

la eoucftTioN .'i 



/( 7 ) ATttLETE 



VOL 3. 




AlM'T IT 6(?e(VT Ji>ST To J-iE HE«e "* 
Ttte 'M0'^^(|^»6 ANO LisTeN To THOSe Pel- 
LOUJS COLLECT THE 11^ B^J^INESS" ? SomE- 
TlmE5 I DON T tvftue Up IN TIME To HE(»(? 

TrtEW fVNO /ny uortoLB DAY IS 
SPOILED — 5- 




©H.'tve B^ftD The Loi/6i.iesT AieftL \H 

THE MesSHBJ-L TOOflY — ^orviE OP 
THfVT ODoTfteLE /?OftST 8E6F-ANI> 
Y-UfVf (3Mr&E0"S Rice PuOoiMG Foi^ 
OE'sERTj "^ 




XHis IS MftY FETE OftV-/T- 
HftSN'T RftlNEb eur HALF Tl+E D^Y 
/VNO Lc/E'RE e^OINC TO HftVE IT 

ON Tifoe.' ^ ,w-y^ y 

I 





TrtftT's Jbck Mftjof?^ ths DF0« Bov-Ht 
jiN^y-flMO He's So (MooeiT «e "^on't eveaj 

S/N6 l«l*Eff Me'S /^lONE FOK FEfl^ So/W&DME 

i«/ll.L OV6«He*i; ri"M i9ft*0 T^t//V^ _ 

he's S•TUC^ ow Hir»iyei-F— > 




HE f?EOLLV HAS fi BEftUTI- 
PUL SIOICS , XiVT HE T H'^tK^ 
TS TEKSIBLE— I ^TOLeJ /p\ 

tin ftuDiE/sce o«ce /-''^ ^/ 
BM rie D/OA/r I /■ I 

KNO>^ Mnvc^e / ^/^! 



Sif?- VME'LL H«ve Vou </.voei?STftMO t«*t 
THIS i» THE SCULLIONS BALL-ftwo »f 
— = '-"JTH fl"--"'-.^ — "■- " 



JTK PiN-iJHINS ON tin e^eoTH 
U'dT^, pOilTIMgL'i 

ReFuSco 

ftOMITTflNCfj- 



PR. ftLTENBuKC 
TOLD Tt*e ClftSS 
AN Of^lG/NRL 
ioKE ToOflY- 



VEf+- fie Sf^e telis 
some FuNNV crjsr— 

MEiA/ ONES^Too — I Just 
LfiFF ftNB LftFF — ^o'*lE- 

-TimEs esieri 

AFTEfs 
T I CLftSS 'S^ 




AH- THERE IS eD&»V« P(?«CT1C(N6 fl&«'N- 

iT.s cA/orjoei^FoL. TO ffEfti-i^e ue is 9*o- 

GIT6SSIN<5 Xo R«PlDJ-Y-Of= COOr^SE He 
CfliM'T Pi-«Y ^ET B<^T HE LEft'?l>(5^ So 
fftST- A'X'' ' Op LOVE Towefti^ H-ivi — 

I'm So JL(7(MCSoME t^tE'^ ^- . - 

HE STOPS- FOIT_,, --"^CS '^|< 




-jf lA/ENT ouer^ TO COLLEOe 
\fJtH LftST N'6H-T «<V0 ftTE A 
rtAi*^ SftNOU/ICtt- fl-NO A (LOP e(= 
COFFEE AND rr DIDN'T COST 
6l(T ft 
DOLLAI^ 




VOL.10 




nribte t Q'"^r^~igr^7m.its> avigit^ 



THE PARROT 




NOTICE 
Edge over, Rechel, Chairez, Ellis, 
and Moore, your Raven has a new 
nest-mate. Your bird was vile; the 
Parrot will be putrid. He will out- 
menk your prophet, Mencken, and 
out'rhyme your out-house bards. 

WE^RE GRIPED 

We're griped with never getting 
in campus activities. We live in town, 
and know none of the dorm men, 
but we want to handle things to suit 
ourselves. Athletics are all wrong; 
we couldn't make the teams, and we 
are too busy to attend the games. 
Besides, yeUing hurts our lungs. 

The college man is all wrong. He 
drinks and is rather lax m his morals; 
our stomachs won't stand liquor, 
and our sex life is of the small boy 
variety. 

Let us be more aesthetic. Leave 
the price of pickles and affairs mun- 
dane to the Babbitts, for we are not 
made of common clay. With butter- 



S Q E) Q CDC3C3G1I3E] C313E)i3Q 

a 



B 

m 

(3 
(D 

10 
Q 
H 
W 




MAY 1926 

''To wnte without ir.- 
telligence is a ruinous 
abuse of a nohle func- 
tion, and the degrada- 
tion of any adolescent 
can be yneasured bv the 
degree of his addiction 

to It." 



fly net and a book of verse, let us 
flit o'er the greensward in search of 
the true meaning of life. 

A LEGEND 
Remember that night in the bath tub, 

'Twas toward the waningof spring. 
And as I stepped to the bath mat, 

1 had left — what a beautiful ring ! 

'Tis fall, and the leaves from the 
pee-elms 
Have fallen with a terrible bing. 
But still when I chance near the 
bath-tub. 
There's the ring that I left m the 
spring. 




g%^ jjKri^i^ '^i(r^^ibi)i^t^te ^^^^" 




WHAT A WHALE OF A DIFFERENCE A "fEW SENSf" MAKE'=: (tO THE 

'"raven" editors) 




rHE truth about biology lab 



HFlbii-e ii-^'2i^' C^^^!ig>-ii? ev-igit^ 



OUR FAMILY ALBUM 

CUPPED FROf^ THEIR FAVORITE SCRAP BOOKS. 





Th 


e pickanninnyh 


0(1 of 




Dr. 


Jack Shelton is 


amply 




suptrested above. The 


NipKer 




)iad 


a standing re 


olution 




aj^ai 


nst watermelons 


from 




Jam 






J 









cT'''^^^ jfclce '^^(i7^i^i?ifet;<^te "^^^^ 



OUR FAMILY ALBUM 

CLIPPED FROn THEIR P^VOf?/TE 5C/?flP TO^S. 












\ Logan 


Waterman, of 


El 


Paso and 


Juarez. 


with 


his 


first tin 


bugle. 


the 


sift 


of an u 


icle. He 


used 


to 


play whe 


n company ce 


me 


for dinn 


■■• 







The Womack brothers. 
in their first knee breech- 
es. Snapped in Mexia. 
Note unusual alertness. 



H 


azel Canna 




ago. 


preparing 


for Rice 


entrance exams 


in math 


100. 







^TFIh^eUQ^ig (gr^7^aits» avigCt^ 



This fellooj 


ujas oace 




amoo-s as 


arv. au.tl-Lop 


fn 


of LUllAlu 


m.aQiaa live 
r ic tioa — 


ff 


^ 




1 


_jl 





iTlo (liqWt of (ancu uia5 
too far fetckei - Ro 
tWerwe too arotesc^ue 
to enqaqe Uis fjen.— 



His critics 


of tea 






scored him. 


for kis 






curioasly 


u.n.rea.1 




/'* 


'f 




^Sw 


( 


^^ 


) 








A 


/ 


^^^ 


h 






His imac^iaa 
no bounds - 

■fa.n-tastic be 
descr-i 1= t 


tioa kneuJ 

Wis stones 
d, nx3.dL. 
_^oni , 
1 on,. ^^^^ 




o 




\ 


i 


£ 


d^ 


J\ 



But one nt 


ciK-t ke 






was found, 
mad' 


ravia<^ 

x 


J 


p 


f 


<r^ji 


1 





re3-Ain.ci a co(?<j 
3{ tke TixresKer. 




-JoL'l K( sen '26 



<r^^^ J^iee '^C^^lbifet^feie "^^^^^ 




'I've been Miss/N^ 
so ROE ay ciAss 

A LOT LRTeLY — 



(4ow MftNY 
COTS HAVE 




-^ ^ 



^TTfeteU^'a^i^ (gr^:^svit5> ^igtfl:^ 





The Campanile comes out on time 



BROTHERLY LO\E 

Abercrombie: You are 
certainly a fortunate 
man. 

Pyc: How is that? 

AbtTiroiiibic: You are 
in lovewith yourself and 
haven't a competitor in 
the world!" 




c?°N^ JK7iei$^ '^i8;?ii..^4?iA?iVi^fce ^^^^^ 



^kvi skould ta-se-ba.ll LeaLims monobollie ike 
Sbpir\C] tpc\-(air\<q iciea-^ lokii n.ot trala For ones 



miop tke retura M^,. 

• — to IKe.old. ^^^^fc, covJ^ld-jou. 




all "r\ew Sojsns skoulci 
t>e ^a Corvclitioa 

•2 > ' 




\n- cien-eras. 



5cie\ l^os-erz. 



■a-ad r\m.t>eriaa tl^e 



HFlai-e Ti-^ "^i^ (gIav-ieiiSi.-iK>.sv-^Xt^ 



EDITOR'S PAGE 

An editor tisiuilly has snereil things he wants to say in rather a personal vein. 
Hence the following two pages 



THE STAFF 



fiORTU^•E must have been in the hest 
ot spirits this year when the staff was 
chosen to assist the Cauipmiile edi- 
tor. As a result that editor desires to hurl 
a figurative bouquet of genuine gratitude 
to every member of the staff" who has 
correctly interpreted and fulfilled his job. 
Only one or two were disappointing. The 
others proved beyond a doubt that a col- 
lege annual staff can work as smoothly and 
co-operate as splendidly as the highly effi- 
cient and paid staffs of professional pub- 
lications. 
A word about the department heads: 
What more capable artist could have 
been hoped for? An artist who knows Rice 
— her ideals and her meaning — through 
having studied there; one who has pro- 
gressed a good ways in the world of art: 
Margaret Brisbine has done a splendid 
work this year. 

Bernard Segal was truly a "find". The 
excellence of his photography is not en- 
tirely representative of his value to the 
Campanile. His splendid attitude and his 
earnest, steady work and faithfulness made 
him much more than just a good photog- 
rapher and cartoonist. 

Harvin C. Moore 
was in training for 
his job as editor of 
the 1927 Campanile, 
and his value to the 
1926 book it would 
be hard to estimate. 

4xf^ Helen Clarke and 

'^■^^^ I.ura Duff are cer- 

>2 ^^ tainly to be com- 

■ ^^^ mended, while Ma- 
Bi.ANCHARD rlon Hubbell and 

Ruth Blackwel! deserve credit for their 
first bit of colletie annual work. 




There was no more thorough workman 
on the staff than Don Henderson, who 
handled his job in an e.xtraordinarily effi- 
cient way. His organization section is am- 
ple proof of this. 

Always there when needed, hard-work- 
ing and thoroughly capable: Joe Heyck 
proved to be the type that is "editorially 
loved." 

Hendrix Davis, Clarence Canterberry, 
Mary Trammel], and Clara Becker were 
of decided value to the business manage- 
ment. 

Outside the staff" there are always those 
who generously give their advice and as- 
sistance. In this connection thanks are due 
Carroll Blanchard, who has been of ma- 
terial assistance to half dozen Campaniles, 
Dan Willett, another "old head" among 
Campanile staffs, Henry Stanim, T. J. 
Baker, R. E. Dunn, Margie Draper, Essve 
Mae Howers, Chauncey Stewart, and the 
professional staffs of the Rein Printing 
Co. and the Parke Engraving Co., as well 
as the F.idson, Keystone, and Wheat stu- 
ciios. P^specially to be appreciated was the 
splendid assistance and advice of Jack 
Fcjster. Besides these there are others 
whom the eciitor would like to thank per- 
sonally for their help and encouragement. 

Believing that a place to work is a pri- 
mary need of any school publication staff, 
the Campanile "bosses" this year opened 
a "downtown office" at SlSj/^ Capitol 
avenue. The 1927 staff is retaining the 
office, as succeeding staffs no doubt will 
do. A building for all Rice publications is 
being planned for the future. It will prob- 
ably be erected on the campus, together 
with the students' co-operative store. 



cr-^^^ Jl^iee "^tt^^feil^i^fee ^^^^^" 



EDITOR^S PAGE-Continued 



CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE 



To Lo\'ett Aiuler- 
s o n A b e r c r o m b i e 
goes the credit of 
bei ng one of the most 
remarkably efficient 
business managers 
that probably any 
school publication 
has ever had. 

Two year-books he 
managed for Rice. 
In both unquestion- 
ably fine has been the quality of the art 
work, engraving, and printing, which it is 
the duty of the business manager to buy. 
Whatever can be said of the editorial man- 
agement, the record of the business man- 
agement stands unchallenged as to thor- 




5ERL ROMBIE 



ough-going efficiency. Such was the work 
of Lovett Abercrombie that the 1925 Cam- 
panile is worth m round figures almost four 
thousand dollars more than his book of the 
precedmg year, which also showed a big 
increase in cost over the 1924 Campanile. 
It takes efficiency to provide for high 
class art work, engravings, and printing. 
It takes courage to bear up under the 
sneers and jeers of a student body that 
doesn't understand the business managers 
of its publications. It takes a stout heart 
to remain silent when false accusations are 
flung broadcast by a group of deliberately 
lying or ridiculously misinformed "crit- 
ics." These virtues Lovett Abercrombie 
has had, and Rice, far more than the stu- 
dents realize, owes him a debt of gratitude. 



TIME FOR A CHANGE 



The position ct publication business managers 
at Rice affords one of the many arguments for a 
radical change in the system of student self-gov- 
ernment. It is this change that the Campanile 
would here like to suggest. 

Placing the cart before the horse, a publication 
board is needed. This dees not imply a censor 
board. Far from it. It means simply that a system 
is needed at Rice whereby the publications would 
be placed under an organized and responsible 
board of control, the "control" referring chiefly 
to the method ot selecting editors and business 
managers. 

In order to eliminate the popular notion that 
a publication manager is a modern enlarged edi- 
tion of the notorious Jesse James, and in order to 
provide a method ot selecting the best — and not 
merely the most popular — student for the office, 
the following ideas are here suggested to indicate 
two of the possible duties of the publication board: 
First, the appointment of the business manager 
from a field oj candidates, the student selected to 
be a Senior, who would receive a worthwhile 
amount of money (to be publicly known) tor his 
work; second, the selection of several candidates 
for editor, a choice to be made from the.se by 
popular vote of the entire student body. Candi- 
dates for business manager would be in training 
through their Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior 
years, with the reward of the managership in their 



Senior year it they had shown the most ability. 
.\ business managership should be a "big money" 
proposition if the book is to be a "big money" 
publication. The editor, who gets the credit or 
discredit for the book, and who is animated pri- 
marily through his interest in the work, should 
receive only a small salary. Plans similar to this 
are in practice in most universities today. 

Placing the horse back in position, there should 
be a thorough change away from the sad farce- 
comedy that now exists at Rice under the name 
of "student self-government." In its place should 
be instituted a system with faculty representation 
and responsibility on the students' council. Such 
a system would bring students and faculty to- 
gether on serious issues and would force each into 
a more sincere frame of mind as regards the posi- 
tion and welfare of the students as a body. 

These are personal opin- 
ions, briefly and imper- 
fectly stated because of 
lack of space. But they 
indicate possibilities and 
can be taken for what they 
are worth. 




nri^:'eTi^""^r^~lgr^^ii;^its> a^ 



REQUIESCAT 

'T he curtdin drops s/o-iclv, siid/x, on an 
eventful xear, and sleep, beautiful sleep . . . 
. . ,e-ven he who knits up the ravelled sleeve 
of care , . . , sleep unsolicited, comes over us. 

'''"To sleep , . . . perchance to dream . . . .ave, 
there's the rul>" . . . '■'■II 'hen is the ["ampanile 

coming out?" Qrav hairs circled 

exes, heavy lids , . . r-Ah, come sleep . . . .nice 

.... pretty .... soothing .... beautiful 

.riiVf'/ sleep .... 

-jimen . 




'ARTISTIC "PORTRAITUTie 




K^rsrOih(£ STUDIO 

JULIA ANNE CON LEY 

200-06 KEYSTONE BUILDING 

Telephone Preston 327 




Trade Mark Registered U. S. Patent Offic 



PRODUCING 



PIPE LINES 



Wherever you see this sign, 
you can be assured of — 

Better Oils-Better Service 



HUMBLE OILS 

-Refined in one ot the most modern 
refineries in the world. 

-Have established a standard ot high 
quality. 



REFINING 



MARKETING 



Humble Oil &: Refining Co. 

Houston, Texas 




Sargent Hardware is more than so much hrass or bronze 
applied to windows and doors! It is a finely decorative 
thing, capable of making a lieautiful interior more beauti- 
tul, ot carrying out the architectural scheme of the home. 

Consider, tor instance, the graceful Sargent lever handle 
illustrated in the DuBarrv, a Louis XVI design. This 
handle is admirably used on the popular double French 
doors or French windows. It connects with the Sargent 
"easy spring" lock set for interior doors — a triumph ot 
the locksmith's skill. 

All ot vour home — outside and inside, upstairs and down — 
will be made more secure and lietter looking bv the proper 
Sargent Hardware. 

Let us consider with vou the hardware tor your home. 



'I'c'xas Hfudquarlcrs Idr WIkiUsuU' HiiRlwaR- and Sup|)lics 

P E D K N IRON & S T K \i L C () 



HOUSTON- 



S A X A X 'I' () X 1 O 



s H R !•; \' !•: I' () k I- 



SUPER VALUES 




The better dressed men are 
realizing that thev, too, can 
biiv the kind of men's fur- 
nishings here that real men 
like to wear. The difference 
in price is worth saving. You 
never pav more at 




Just Inside the Preston. Avenue Entrance 



YOU NEVER PAY MORE AT FOLEY BROS. 



Qj >/ip I'u/i Cfl t s of 

South Texas Cotton Oil 
Company 

Manufacturers of 

PLATO 




SALAD OIL 



PANCRUST 




SHORTLNINCi 



^akowitzj^ro5 



/vT 




Sakowitz Bros, clothes are tailored with that 

desirable confidence swing which stamps the 

college man " Well Dressed' ' 



CLOTHES — HATS — SHOES — FURNISHINGS 




R. B. BOWEN & CO. 

^onds and Insurance 



I 1 02 Second National Bank Huilding 
J-'hone Preston 7208 Houston, Texas 




ENGINEERING ski]l of the vcFv highest type is 
required in the designing and manufactur- 
ing of all Reed Rotary Drilling Tools. 

Year bv year the requirements grow more exact- 
ing in the production of oil and more depend- 
ent becomes the industry on the trained mind 
of engineers. 

It is the high hope and ambition of The Reed 
Roller Bit Company that from Rice Institute 
may come many leaders in petroleum produc- 
tion and the necessary tools therefore. 

Reed Roller Bit Company 

Houston, Texas Los Angeles, Cal 




The \V:iv to Tr:ivel 



Convenient 
Schedules 

And Superior Service 



VIA 



Southern F 



I SK I'HK 

Southern Pacific 
Lines 

\'IA 

New Orleans 
Shreveport 
Dallas 
Denison 
F.I Paso 
Houston 
Fort Worth 
San Antonio 
Beaumont to 
California 
and all points North 



W. C. McCORMICK, 

(jeii'l Pass, .-jgenl 



THE passenger train schedules of "Southern Pacific" 
(familiarly called "SP") are so arranged as to give 
greatest convenience at connecting points. It's a policy of 
the "SP" to "make connections." Trains are scheduled to 
leave the larger cities at the generally accepted times of con- 
venience to the majority of the traveling public. In fact every 
aim of the Southern Pacific Lines is to serve the convenience 
and comforts of its patrons. 

WHEN YOU TRAVEL EITHER FOR 
BUSINESS OR PLEASURE 

Via Southern Pacific 

You're sure to observe this feature 



Information on ^Rates^ % 

Southern I 



HOUST 



Freight Rates 
are Uniform 

But How x\bout Service? 

Route Your Freight Shipments Via 

icific Lines 




" The Way to Ship " 



FOLLOW THRU" Service means a 
"straight shot" to destination. On in-coming 
and out-going freight shipments you can depend on 

Southern Pacific Lines to "follow thru" 

with service that insures promptness and dispatch . 

WHENEVER VOU ARE SHIPPING 

"FROM OR TO" 

Consult the "SP" Agent or 
General Freight Department 

es^ etc.y Qheerfiilly Qiven 

icific Lines 

TEXAS 



Industrial 
Locations 

Manufacturing 
Sites 

To interested parties we 
have available detailed 
information on many 
points in Texas where 
there are good oppor- 
tunities for industrial 
and business develop- 
ment. 



T. G. BEARD, 

Gen 7 Freight Agetjt 



Things That Qost V\(othing 

Are often more \aliiable than high 
priced commodities. 

Take courtesy tor instance. Cour- 
tesy does not cost a dime — but cour- 
tesy, with a little dash of "Instant 
Service" has built this bank. 

We believe voli will like Courtesy. 



i(S->ii^ifrs« 



The National Bank of Commerce 

HOUSl ON, TEXAS 

'•'■The 'Bank of ['oiirtcyv" 



^■ToMflHE THE LIST OF caw pos &aaFis coMPUii 

This 

SPtEMDlp 

616 PJCCF'T 
To fltVONE 

JI^RiWO" TO 

Bocn Tttf 

pF Rice 

UTei?Aity 
socienes 




-vv«Y nor eivF THi; DftWY 
CoNcesS'Of^ To some, 





UTIL13.IMG THE eXcei.L£(Sr 
nOveRTISIN6 SPACE c/y THE 



tX^MS ©VE»5 3, THE STUC^tES LE<^VE F®«5 HOWt 




Compliments vi 



Alexander-Sprunt &^ Son 



Incorporatcii 



ANDREWS, STREETMAN, LOGUE tS? MOB LEY 
ATTORNEYS AT I. AW 



FRANK ANDREWS 


M 


E. KURTH 






PALMER BRADLEV 


SAM STREETMAN 


R 


F. CAMPBELL 






J. R. ANDREWS 


JNO. G. LOGUE 


J- 


R. STONE 






HOWARD P. GREEN 


JNO. A. MOBLEV 


E 


J. FOUNTAIN, JR 






W. M. STREETMAN 


W. L. COOK. 


J 


L. LOCKETT, JR. 






RICHARD F. BURNS 


ROBERT H. KELLV 


S 


J. THOMAS 






JAS. E. KILDAV 




V.NTON 


NATIONAL BAN-K 


Bin 


DING 








HOUSTON, TEXAS 







Compliments ot 



SPENCER-SAUER 
LUMBER CO. 

2320 McKinnev Avenue 




3:i)E ISartoitfe JPaUroom 

Scene of many a pleasant evening 




'here\'er and whenever Rice Alumni gather they 
are reminded ot the pleasant things incident to their 
college life. Class rooms and exams fade out into the back- 
ground of their memory leaving only friendships, athletic 
events and social gatherings to the toretront. 

As important now as it was then in the scheme ol things 
is the Ballroom ol 




SINE CERA 



WHEN Rome was in the height 
of her glory and the populace 
had Its greatest appreciation for art, 
there were hundreds of sculptors 
engaged in creating beautiful stat' 
ues for the civic temples of that 
great capital. 

So large was the demand tor mar- 
ble that blocks of perfect stone were 
at a premium. Shrewd 
craftsmen learned to carve 
their works of art from 
less costly but flawed mar- 
ble, filling the cracks and 




crevices with beeswax. Thus 
they obtained the price of perfect 
work. 

Honest sculptors, to guarantee 
purchasers of genuine value, labeled 
their statues sine cera, which is Lat- 
in for "without wax'' &? from that 
we have our modern word "sincere]' 
So, too, does Sweeney's mark bear 
"Si7ie Cera'''' to assure all 
who come here to pur- 
chase that the articles they 
select are true to name and 
sound in value. 



J.J.SWEENEY JEWELRY CO. 

419 MAIN STREET CORNER PRAIRIE AVENUE 



(^0 mp iim ents of 

Humphreys Corporation 



Houston, Texas 



Wm. a. \IXS0X J. A. ELKIXS CLYDE A. SWEKTOX WHARTOX E. WEEMS 

C. M. HIGHTOWER FRED R. SWITZER R. A. SHEPHERD 

S. S. McCLENDOX, Jr. WARREX J. DALE GEO. E. B. PEDDY E, D. ADAMS 

Wm. states JACOBS, Jr. HORACE D. GROGAN 



VINSON ELKINS SWEETON 
8c WEEMS 

-Jittonieys at j(\iif 



Second Floor (nilt Buildint 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 




NIELS ESPERSON BUILDINC; . HOME OF 

GUARDIAN TRUST COMPANY 



Qapital .... 
Su?-plus .... 
Undivided T'rojifs 
Total T(esources 



; 300,000.00 

400,000.00 

84,354.21 

4,216,572.90 



GENERAL BANKING AND TRUST FACILITIES 



QoHE 




Hut ^N^or FoRoorrEN (e-%3 



GRADUATiox Book gives you the means to keep 
an accurate record ot )'our college years, vour 
friendships and pleasures, a record invaluable to 
you in years to come. '^1^-5 Select books, bound 
in cloth or leather, are here for you at Wilson's in 
varying sizes and colors, priced S4.00 and up. 

^'' A pleasure to shoiv you" 



IaIii cn\I^STAT10NERY/7^ 
fflLjUJXANDPRINTlN&VJJ. 



PRESTON 1 , 1 ' ,.J <TATinMFDY/*-^ 5o8 - U o 

FANNIN ST. 



Evcrv Se/'vicc Vou ILvpect of a Drng Store 



THE GABLES, Inc, 

RICKS DRIC; STORK 

Drugs a)i(l Confections 

Phoiifs Haiile\' 2100 or 21; 00 



:; I 00 Main Street Houston, Texas 



Houston 
Dallas 

San Antonio 



Fort Worth 
Beaumont 
Memphis, Tenn. 




V JNCORPORATED 



GUARANTEED GlJOTHHS I 




'liim 




You Jn^ Know 

they wcar^VictorV'' 
Wilson Clotncs. 
Smart dressers 
evcrvwlicre _^ 

on the ,'^>, 




*Ap©lo^es ioM^CalluTiv 



V 




FRANK L. HOLTON, Mgr. 

419^ Main Street 



Coal 



and 



Wood 



Central Wood & Goal Go. 

Preston 422 Preston 1166 



JAS. P. HOUSTOUX Gi:0. A. TVLl'^R LOUIS A. STEVESON 

Insurance 
HOUSTOUN <&^ TYLER 

608-612 Union National Bank Buililinn 

Complete "Hartford" Service for lAutomobiles 
Private Branch Kxchange: Preston 1692 



Qompliments of 



Houston Gulf Gas Co. 



Hogan-Allnoch Dry Goods Co. 

WHOLESALE 

Dry Goods ^ A^otio/is, Me/f s Fui'nishin'J Goods 
and Ladies' Ready to Jf^ear 

Texas Avenue and Austin St. HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Levy Bros. Dry Goods Co, 

"For Over a Third of a Century 
An Institution ot Service" 



Ifellow 



Cab 











The 






SERVICE 






Rendered bv anv business is a reflec- 






tion of the character of the men who 






plan its policies and those who carry 






them out. Many of those who have 






helped in building up Houston's uni- 






fied transportation system and in 






maintaining the fastest Interurban 






Service in America, have been 






educated at Rice 






Institute 






1 






HOUSTON ELECTRIC CO. <S^ 






GALVESTON-HOUSTON ELECTRIC RY. CO. 




a 


™=^ 


d 



3=^ _=^ — = =13 

A. D. LAN'GHAM J. G. MAILLOT 


LANGHAM 8c MAILLOT 


General Insurance 


Gulf Building Houston, Texas 


E. R. MATHEWS MISS GUSSIE NORDHAUSEN 


MATHEWS HARDWARE CO. 


So"; FANNIN STREET - HOUSTON TEXAS 


OPPOSITE COTTON HOTEL PHONE PRESTON 5620 


Kennedy, 




Dentists' and Physicians' Supplies 


Williams, 


Hospital and Office Equipment 


Lee & Hill 


Elastic Hosiery, Trusses and 
Supporters 




Rubber, Leather and Electrical 


JlAlVy^ERS 


Goods 


T. M. KKNNKRLY 




FRED L. WILLIAMS 




JESSE J. LEE 


■*«!»*■ 


(;E0. a. hill, Jr. 




PEVERIL 0. SEITLE 




IRL F. KENNERLV 




\V. H. BLADES 
AL.\N B. CAMERON 
T. E. KENNERLY 


Pendleton GP Arto 




(INCORPORATED) 


Scanlan Building 


529-537 Kress Building 


H()lSTO\, TEXAS 

E 


HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Headquarters tor friends ot A. & M. Cadets 

HOTEL BRYAN 

The Oasis Between Houston and Dallas 
BRYAN, TEXAS 

MRS. J. S. DOANE, Proprietress 




Ladies' and Children's Hair Cutting a Speciality 



ABC BARBER SHOP 

529 W. Alabama 



Special Prices on Athletic 
Goods to Rice Students 



C.L.BERING CO 

709 Travis Street 



A. Lawrence Toombs & Sons 

(Est. 1S99) 

WHOLES.ALE POULTRY AND EGGS 

Phones: Pres. 1918, Pres. 276 

919-921 Commerce Avenue 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 



O. HILL MUSIC HOUSE 

'•JhUuical Instruments, String and 'Trimmi/a^s 

HIGH GRADE REPAIR WORK 

Special agents State of Texas for 

Robert Clarinets, King-Band Instruments 

"I'isil the Hills and vien' the seenerv" 



; io't Main Street 



Houston, Texas 



HAMILTON BROS. 

5 lo Main Street 

S/n'rt \Makers Tailors 

-Jhten' s Furnishers 

THE WELL DRESSED MAN KNOWS HAMILTON QUALITY 



Teolin Pillot Co. 

^ooks^ Fine Stationery 
Engraving 



1014 Texas Avenue 

sixty Steps from Main Street 



Houston, I'exas 



VIGOROUS AGE 



As an institution the First 
National Bank of Hous- 
ton is sixty years old. 

As a factor in the business 
affairs of Southwest Texas, 
its vigor and influence are 
clearly reflected in its uni- 
form growth and develop- 
ment from year to year. 



••^^• 



The First National Bank 

OF HOUSTON 



Resources, Fo?'ty Million T)oIIars 




College Men 

You want your gay hues and the last word in style. 
But hack ot these you also want quality and service. 
You want clothes that look well and wear well at 

$34.50 & $45 

We have assembled suits that will meet 
your requirements 

JSfhttxlin'd^ 

•Clotiiej Jt Quality 
tvlaip fjt Capitoi 



To the Freshman: 
ENGINEER and ARCHITECT 

We have supplied 

Instruments and 
Drafting Supplies 

At a DISCOUNT for the past ten year 

Why /lot let us supply voursr' 



TEXAS BLUE PRINT 
& SUPPLY CO. 

420 Fannin St. 



COMFORT WITHOUT EXTRAVAGANCE 




Jlousitnii, tlTexas^ 

77/<? Universitv Stude?if s 
Headquarters 



Francis I Dining Room 
Roof Garden — 200 foot elevation 
Cafeteria — seating 700 
Lunch Room and Coffee Shop 
Beauty Parlor 



600 ROOMS OF SOLID COMFORT 



WHEN VOU ARE ON YOUR OWN RESOURCES 



^B^mcmbcr— 



MASURY PL RE PAINTS & VARNISHES 
ADD TO SANITATION, HEALTH 
AND APPEARANCE. 



James Bute Company 

Texas Avenue at Eannin .S'z.v/_v years dependahlc service to the 

HOUSTON, TEXAS people oj Houston and Texas 



Everything Electrical 



Barden Electric & Contracting Co. 

I I I Main Street Houston, Texas 



MACO STKWAKT J. H. LANGBEX MACO STEWART. JR. \V. C. MORRIS 

President Vice-Pres. \'ice-Pres. \'ice-Pres., Sec'y 



STEWART TITLE GUARANTY 
COMPANY 

Capital 5 1 ,2 ^0,000.00 

INSURES LAND Til LKS AND LIKNS 



TJircctors 




.MAfO STEWART JOHN SEALV 


P. WAVERLE^• SMITH 


J. H. LAXGBEN MACO STEWART. Jr. 


GKO. T. BURGESS 


W. C. MORRLSS F. W. 


CVn-ERAU. 


Offices 




HOUSION IJ.\1.I..\S 


GALVESION 


SAN .VN'IONIO 


KI. l'.\SO 



INVEST YOUR MONEY 

In First Lien Guaranteed 
Real Estate Mortgages 

Sold and Quaranteed by the 

Bankers Mortgage Company 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS S2,6oO,000.00 



OUR MORTGAGES ARE COUPON NOTES IN DENOMINATIONS OF 

|ioo, I500 and Si 000. 



All of our Mortgages are well secured by real estate and un- 
conditionally guaranteed by us, interest and principal. 

All you have to do is to clip the coupons and send them in tor 
collection, or deposit them with your bank the same as you 
would government or other coupon bonds. 

No Investor, through this Company, has ever waited a single 
day for his principal or interest. We take the trouble and the 
responsibility. Every Detail and Precaution necessary to 
safeguard our loans are carefully looked after by us; all appraise- 
ments of property are made by our own appraiser; all buildings 
are kept insured for the protection of note holders. 

Our representatives are unconditionally guaranteed by our en- 
tire capital stock and surplus of §2,600,000.00. 



T)emand bankers <-J)(Cortgage Qotnpany Quaranteed -JhCortgages 

Bankers Mortgage Company 

bankers mortgage building 
houston, texas 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS |2j6oO,000.00 



Building Materials 

We are headquarters tor nearly e\ervthing in the way ot 
staple items and specialties in the building material line. 
Waterproof engineering is one ot our main branches and 
we kn(n\' we can serve vou to your advantage. 

W. L. MACATEE & SONS 

HOUSTON and DALLAS 



Seiberling All-Tread 




Geo. L. Glass & Sons 

1000 Travis— HOUSTON— Phone Pr. 4145 
SYLVAN BEACH 



City Market 



Cox Fish Market 

Sea Foor/s of ^^11 Kinds 
Iloustcm, Texas 



Preston i '542 



Our Motto 
SERVICE i£ DEPEXDABILITV 



S. J^ ^Bjchards Qorp. 

SODA FOUNTAINS 
FOUNTAIN £- JANITOR SUPPLIES 



I 6ii 



I lO-I 12 TRAVIS STREET 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



The Schuhmacher Company 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

"Baker's Supplies, £otton Factor' s 
CUPPLES CORD AUTO TIRES 

HOUSTON - EAGLE LAKE - LA GRANGE - XAVASOTA 
ROBSTOWX - SMITHMLLE - MCTORLA, TEXAS 



DECKER'S 



POPULAR FOR 200 YEARS 




r 



Call on us for 

^S3^ANA 

HAM — BACON 



For Sale at All Grocery Stores 
and Meat Markets 



'■'•The Taste Is So Qood''' 



\Vm. F. Guenard J. H. Speed Fred S. K. Clemens 

Guenard, Speed &^ Clemens 

Wholesale Fruits a?id 'Produce 

Phones: Preston 4589-2604 Long Distance 52 
8i~-8i9 Commerce Avenue Houston, Texas 



Dealy-Adey-Elgin Co. 

PRINTERS— MANUFACTURING STATIONERS 

Preston 143-314;; 717 La Branch St. 



W.T. GARTER &BRO. 

-JhCdiiiifticturcrs of 

YJUJ.OW PINE 

ami 

HARDWOOD LU M B 1^ R 

Houston, Texas 



Compliments of 



Jesse H. Jones 



CLEANED 



PAN'TITORIUM LAUNDRY 

KLASSY Kl.EANERS & DYERS 
Phone Preston 4700 



Compliments of 

Sabine Lumber Co. 

2nd Nat'l. Bank Bide. 



Mannjaclurers oj 
YELLOW PINE LUMBER 



J. D. Ferguson, President 

J. W. Reynolds, Vice-President 

J. P. Towery, Treasurer 




ESTABLISHED 1895 

HOUSTON DRUG 
COMPANY 



Wholesale Druggists 



hiiporters and yohbers 
Druorg-ists' Sundries 



Manufacturers of 
P harmaceuticals 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 



WALK-OVER 

The College Man's Faxorite 

sHo e 




WALK-OVER SHOE STORE 



618 MAIN SI'KI'.in' 



. IccoiDils So/iciU'il 



GRAIN READY-CUT HOUSE CO 




MANa'FACrURKRS Ol' 

RFADY-CUT AND SP'.CriON'AI, HOUSKS 



orric'K AND I'l.Axr 



COK. Ml I, in' AM) l'()l,K 



HO IS TON, TKXAS 



J^ng and Short cQeaf Tellozv T*ine 
Southern Hardwoods 



LUMBER TIMBERS 

TIES 



Kirby Lumber Company 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Ask your retail dealer jor " KIRBY'S STOCK" 



Compliments of 

SEABOARD LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

DUDLEY C. JAR\'IS, Representative 



Houston Packing Company 

Beef and Pork Products 
Edible Oils and Shortening 



Horeji'Biijzos 

THF. NOTK ot genuine hospitality that exists between 
Hotel Brazos and its guests disproves the old theory 
that a man can have but one home. The Hotel Brazos is 
exquisitely appointed and favorable in price. 

Brazos Court is known throughout the South as one of the most beautiful 
outdoor dining places in the country. 

We cordially invite all Rice Students to make the Brazos their head- 
quarters. 

HOTEL BRAZOS 



Hou ARi) D. Huoso> 



The 

Advice of Polonius 

is Good 






"... let thy raiment be 
as costly as thy purse 
can afford ..." 

— Shakespeare 



SHOTWELL'S 

INCORPOR.^TED 

Men s a?id Young Men s Clothing 
Shoes ------- Furtiishing;s 

Houston, Texas 



T^ort Qty Ice ^Delivery 

Courteous Service 

2715 McKiiinc\' Ave. 
Telephdncs: Preston S900-R,^t6 Houston, Texas 



R.B.SALTER 

"Painter cuid "Decorator 

QUALITY 

'Distinctive Interior 'Decorating 
'DiD'alile QommercidI 'Painting 

I 1 if) Xorth Main Street Housttjn, Texas 

Stiulio Portraits Home Portraits 

Qoles Studio 

fiinl"icld and Curdell 

Phone Iladlev 4^94. Let us make vour portraits 

901 Stuart Ave. at .South Main Houston, 'I'e.xas 



DRINK 
TRIPLE XXX ROOT BEER 



'•^yifCakes "Thirst a yov' 



W. T. PECKTNPAUGH 

Houston Territory 



807 McKinney Avenue 
Preston 2884 



THE GOVERNMENT SAYS: 

"Every person, young and old, should drink a quart of milk 
every day to keep in perfect health." 



\l\lk is the only food containing every element needed hy the Ininian body 

OH! Tes! 'Be sure it's 

PHENIX MILK 




We Sell 



Syracuse China used at 
Rice Institute 



the most comprehensive line o^ 
China manufactured. The most 
distinctive, practical and beautiful 
designs created tor 



INSTITl'TIONS, CAFETERIAS 

HOTELS, CLl'BS, RESTAURANTS 

DINING CAR, SHIP USE AND 

HOSPITALS 



The largest display ot Dinnerware in the Southwest, including all 
good goods from low price to finest 

JNO. McCLELLAN & CO., Inc. 

CHINA - GLASSWARE - SILVERWARE - ALUMINUMWARE 
CUTLERY - KITCHEN MACHINERY 

417-419 FANNIN STREET 



established 1868 
COMPLIMENTS OF 

THEO. KELLER CO. 

m^TRIBVTORSOF 

Hiorh Grade Catuied Foods 



Bonds for Investment 



GO\'ERNi\lt:NT RAILROAD 
MUNICIPAL INDUSTRL-VL 



NEUHAUS & CO. 

HOUSTON 



a 





n 




GREAT 






SOUTHERN LIFE 






INSURANCE COMPANY 






HOUSTON 






Offers most attractive low cost poli- 
cies to those desiring to buy insurance 
and remunerative agency contracts 
to those looking for an occupation. 






Experience not necessary. 
IV e teach you. 






The onlv investment required is hon- 
or and energv. 






Assets over $18,000,000 
Insurance in force over $\ 50,000,000 






E. P. Greenwood, President 




B 




^^^^ 



KXGRAVKI) C'ALLINX; CARDS COMMEXCEMEXT IXVITATIOXS 

IXXITATIOXS and 

PROGRAMS 

EMBOSSED FOUXTAIX PEXS 

MOXCCRAM STATIOXER\' EVKRSHARl' I'EXC'Il.S 

IriEl ^5f^C3Il_l_ ^. 

Stationers - I'rinkrs - Kni,'ravcrs 

Cor. CAl'ITOL and BRAZOS Old Address 409-41 1 l<annin Strccr 



ConipUiiicnts of 

Williamson & Landers, Inc. 

i^o ^ Main Street 

MEN'S Wl^AR 

'■'■The Home of 'Brdchuni ('lot lies'' 
HorsTON, Texas 



V, \ I' 

HONEY BOY ICE CREAM 

The Cren))! oj ^'^ttci/itv 

■•♦St5f»- 

DRINK PERIT'C/ILV 

PASTEURIZED MILK 

All Our Products arc the Hest 

LONE STAR CREAMERY CO. 

HOUS'I ON, TKXAS 

Phone: P r e sto x 19V 



n 


LUMBER 

YELLOW PINE AND HARDWOOD 
FOR EVERY PURPOSE 


n 




LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE STOCK OF 

HARDWOOD FLOORING 

IN TEXAS 




_i ^ 


rarrar Lumber Co. 

DEPENDABLE SERVICE 

2401 Texas Avenue Phones Preston 486, 487, 488 





A. T. VicK Company 

Construction Electrical Engineers 

Specialists in 

Power and Industrial Engineering 
Power Transmission 
Illuminating Engineering 



Ineeda Laundry and Cleaning Co, 



Cleaners and Pressers 



''There is a Difference'''' 



Phoxe Preston 562 



712-720 Smith Street 



Houston, Texas 



Comphments of 



H.Y.HowzEiS^Co. 



Houston, Texas 



Rastus: "Say nigga you done got de 
clothin disease?" 

Sambo: "What's dat?" 

Rastus: "Dat's where yo" tongue is 
coated and yo' breath comes in short 
pants." 







1 



fftiiliWiipalii 



;iffiilSs:^rrefett,.-; 






j^£ 

T 





HOUSTON S FASTEST GROWING 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

VALUES BUILT IT - 

FACTS PROVE IT — 

EVERYBODY KNOWS IT 



W. C. MUNN COMPANY 



Every article we sell has our personal guarantee 
We have the right prices to Rice Students 

Cfjlf Supplies— Agents 'Bill -JJocik Ljloves 

Texas Sporting Goods Co., Inc. 

80--809 Fannin Street Phone Preston 234 

Tenuis Rackets Restrung 



ROBERTUS 

Qhiropractic Offices 

OLDEST IN HOl'STOX 

703-5-7 Mason Building Phone Preston 202; 

Graduate of the Palmer School of Chiropractic of Davenport, loiva 



Qofupliiucfits 

THE 

SECOND NATIONAL BANK 

BUILDING 

For/?ierIv the Qai'tcr Building 
HOl'STOX, TEXAS 



Southern States Line 
Texas Star Line 

Regular Liner Service from Houston, Galveston and 
other Texas ports to French, German, Holland, Bel- 
gium, Baltic and Scandinavian ports. 

Lykes Line 

to IV est Indies 

From Houston, Beaumont, and Galveston 
to Porto Rico, and Haiti 



-ylgents for zAmerican Pioneer J^ine and Gulf-West 

Mediterranean J^ne — Service to Spain, 

^^(oj'th ^Africa and Far East 



Lykes Bros. -Ripley S.S. Co., Inc. 
Daniel Ripley &: Co., Inc. 
Lykes Bros. S.S. Co., Inc. 

Phone Preston 2091 
Cotton Exchange Building Houston, Texas 



"oncK nrsTKRS" 
Super Rhone Engine & Flying Corporation 

Sales agents for 

Super Tiji^rjue 'I^i/Jni/ -ytcfo Cn^incs 

Commercial Kl\ inu Cotton Dusting 

P. O. Box 1 5J 

Office and Shop 

igii Rusk Avenue Houston, Texs 



CONGRATULATIONS 

Wishing the chiss of '26 a Happv 
and Prosperous future 

Preston 39S8 K^ CI i / U I I J 9 1 4 Texas Ave. 



American Title Guaranty Company 

Third Mdor I'nion Xatinnal Bank BuiKiing 
HOUSION, IHXAS 



Insures Land Titles in all Parts of 
the Coast C-ountrv 



there's 



A FRIENDLY WELCOME 



AT THIS BANK 



FOR THE 



STUDENTS AND ALUMNI 



OF RICE INSTITUTE 



^^ 



SECOND NATIONAL BANK 

MAIN AT RUSK 

"C^rowi/ig ijcith Houston' 



Syhan "^cach ^ark 

Eat — Swim — Dance 
Port Houston's Playground 



Harris-Hahlo Company 



"HEART OF HOUSTON" 




bB^ 






ad rti 33^ ^3^ 131 



y-^.£^,w- 






Houston's J^zvest ^ig Store 

Six Fhxjrs, Mezzanine and Basement Devoted 

Exclusively to Serving the Wants ot 

Women and Children 

MAIN AT TEXAS 



HENKE & PILLOT 

(INCORPORATED) 



Qrocers 



^02 to 310 Milam Street 
2806 to 2816 Travis Street 



" Where you get the z^ost of 
the 'Best for the Trice' ' 



W. A. SMITH 

Realtor 

BUSIXRSS AND INDLSTRlAl, LOCATIONS 
LOANS AND I N \' KST M K NTS 



821-23 Post Dispatch Building 
Phone Preston 2^-7 Houston, Texas 



Qo)/ipru}iciits of 

Cravens-Dargan Insurance Co. 

I X S L' R A N' C K MAX A (i K R S 



1 loListon, Texas 



SAM HOUSTON HOTEL 




U>iclrr opcratiiDi of 

O'Learv, Mickelsoii 

c\:Hall 



Rates $2.00, ^^2.50 (in (I up 




J = ■■ ■■ — ^B 

BALDWIN & CARGILL 


WHOLESALE 


FRUITS AND PRODUCE 


HOUSTON, TEXAS 


R. D. McDonald c. j. Robertson w m. a. Robertson 

Pn-!iJc;,: r;,r-Presid/nl andC,-n-l Manaser .SVr'y »«,/ Trfas. 


Robertson-MacDonald Lumber Co. 


MA.U..CT....S n....KS ... .X,.„KT.KS 


LUMBER 


office; 214-21 s humble building 
Preston ^37 
PHONES: Preston 1040 

Long Distance 120 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

3 D 



Turing It ^y O^nc 

Qct It "By Six 



CLEANING AND 
FRESSIxNG THAT 
WILL PLEASE YOU 



Eureka Laundry (S-^Dye Works 

V rest on ^6^ 6lO Truvis 'Preston 882 



EMPSON'S 

COLORADO CANNED VECiKTABLES 

Peas •:• Pumpkins •:• ]\raut 

Q'ut Stringh'ss 'Beans 

Hominx •:• Tomutoes 

ARE USED LARGELY IN THE RICE IXSn PUTE 



THEO. KELLER CO, 

DlSTRIHriORS 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



GULF COAST LINES 

INTERNATIONAL GREAT NORTHERN 




FOUR FAMOUS TRAINS 
The Sunshine Special to St. Louis, Chicago and New York 
The Star to Waco, Ft. Worth and north 
The Orleanean to New Orleans and east 
The Houstonian to New Orleans and east 

Satisfacto?'y a?id Dependable 
SERVICE 



CITY TICKET OFFICE 
Lobby Rice Hotel 



G. S. Bruce, D. P. A. 
C. E. Lewis, C. T. A. 



D. W. Morris, C. P. A. 

E. A. Farr, Div. Pas. Agt. 



TEXACO 



Gasoline 
Motor Oils 
Greases 

Lubricating Oils 
Fuel Oils 
Asphalts 
Roofing 

High Grade and Uniform ^iality 
of T^etroleiim ^Products 



"Texaco" statuls for excelleiit atul uniform qualit\'. It also means 

expert service in the choice of a petroleum prmluct to sviit your 

particular work anti conditions. (Jet in touch with oiu- local 

representatives. 



The Texas Company 

(jeneral C)fTices: Houston, Texas 
Agents Everywhere 




BENDER HOTEL 

Houston's Homiest Hotel and 
Most T^opular Tiejtaurant 

J. D. DALEY, Manager 



Curtin Mill Supply 
Company 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Jobbers of: 

MILL SUPPLIES 

HEAVY HARDWARE 

MECHANICAL RUBBER GOODS 

MACHINE TOOLS 
OIL TESTING INSTRUMENTS 

STEAM APPLIANCES 
VALVES, FITTINGS AND PIPE 




€JEEAM 




Use the "Best 

Irvin's Hy-Grade Ice Cream 

A FOOD NOT A FAD 

KIDDIES' SUCKERS 
GENUINE ESKIMO PIES GENUINE ESKIMO ICE 

Preston 3630 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



ED. SACKS FUEL COMPANY 

3100 Butler 
Taylor 1805 Taylor 1215 



Compliments of 



A FRIEND 



EDUCATION — 



BRINGS A GREATER APPRECIATION OF 
THE VALUE OF HOME OWNERSHIP 



Cartcrhilt Homes are easy to buy 
W. T. Carter Lumber &: Building Co, 



CARTERBILT 




The House of Hertzberg Jezvelers Since iSyS 

DIAMONDS 

WATCHES PEARLS JEWELRY 

SILVERWARE CRYSTAL POTTERY 

BRONZES ART WARES 



"T/ie Hertzberg (guarantee 

On a diamond, a watch or a piece 
ot silver, means just this .... 

^ That the house ot Hertzberg has 
been estabHshed since i 878. 

^ That the Hertzberg Guarantee is 
a sound assurance of lasting satisfaction. 

^ That you KNOW what you are 
getting when your purchase is backed 
by the Hertzberg name. 

(^ifts for all occasions 

£lass T'ins and Fraternity Jewelry 
made to order 



HERTZBERG 

J EWE LRY C O. 

'At the sign of the clock" Houston Street cor. St. Mary's 
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 



Buy 1 our Ho 



Bciiutifiil 



GLENDOWER COURT 

Drive out and see the new homes that are luiilt anel under construction 
and are tor sale on verv reasonable terms. Onlv a tew lett. 

FAIN-CAR] 1<:R HOMK BUILDING CO. 



8oi Scanhin HUlt 



'/ ' allies a Ccrla'inix' 



Phone Preston 4vi4 



Q 



row 



<^^^|^ 



//7/// i/ Gro-K'i/io^ 
BANK 



Service 
Kriendliness 
Kfficiencv 



MARINE Bank 

& TRUST CO. 



Denton W. Cooley$*^_V-- President . 
908:, Cong?e^sj^Ave. 



Coui'tesy 

Conriilciice 

Appreciation 




^ 



HOLTON 



THE CHOICE Of ARTISTS 




with 2l Holton^ 
saxophone fro^m^ 

'Parker music Co. 



908 CAPlTOL AVE. 
H O V S T O N' 



evey^ithin^'ii fo'' t^^e Baiyd and. Ofchgstfa. 



1 


i^H 




WORMSER 
Straw Hats 

$2.45 

An atmosphereof 
freshness and Beauty 
is woven into them 
and "Quality Service 
and Value. " 

717 Main St. 

Houston 


1 




^^^^ 



Wallis Drug Store 

3722 Main Street 
Hadlev 220 



Special 'Attention Shown 
Students 



Qo fHp li>n en ts of 



Schoenmann Produce Co. 



Fresh Fruits and '\)eo; eta hies 



QoHipl'unents and hest -wishes 
to the Qampatiile 



MYLES SALT CO., Ltd. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



S. H. FILLERTOX I.. J. BOYKIN I.. W . BONNEI.L 

I'resitieiu \'ice-l'res. and Cicii. Mt;r. Treasurer 



J. G. THORP B. D. SUBERBIKI.LE J. O. HUGGINS 

Secretary Auditor Asst. Sales Mgr. 



BoYKiN Lumber Co. 

Manufacturers and Wholesalers of 

BOYKIN STOCK 

Long i^eaf Yellow Pine 

1<XCLUSI\ 1< AGl'N rS: 

(iult Lumher Company, Fullerton La. 

Chas. R. McC'oniiick ^ C'ompanv, San Francisco, C'al. 

Saginaw Tiniher Company, Aberdeen, Wash. 

Second National Hank Building 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Baker, Botts, Parker 

A X I) 

Garwood 



^^TM^ 



zAttoniexs at jTaic 



^3cr^ 



COMMERCIAL BANK B U I L D I X G 

II O U S T O X , TEXAS 



Prepare Now for Use of 

NATURAL GAS 

For Home or Factory 

A 'phone call will bring our representative 
to give ad\'ice on how to use natural gas 
efficientK' anti cconomicallv. 

W'c carry a complete line (it the most efficient appliances 
atiaptetl to all uses inekuiiny; the 

-^-'B ^'' -America s Ticsf Cjas 'Haf/gi' 

If It's clone with heat — You can do it better with gas 

Houston Gas & Fuel Company 

"Always at Your Service" Telephone Preston i S 12 



Texas Photo Supply Company 



H. COTTRILL, Proprielor 

1017 Texas Avenue 



Jn ^appreciation for the Patrofiagc of 
Rice Students During the Past Year 

Ours is the onK automatic cooled kodak 
finishing plant in Houston 



WADDELL'S 



WADDF.LL'S 





righten the Corner 
where vou are — 



A bright, happy Htc is best. 

So is a bright, cheery comfortable home. 

Both go together, and a home where enjoy- 
ment reigns has no dark corners. 

For over forty-tour years Waddell's have 
helped brighten corners in homes of Irlouston 
and South Texas with furnishings of individu- 
ality — of better quality — priced well within 
sensible limits. 

We know you will find it a pleasure to in- 
spect our stock — as it will be a pleasure for us 
to show it to you. 

Come in at your earliest convenience. 

WADDELL'S 



Prairie Avenue and Fannin Street 



H. I.. ROBERTSON, Pres. 
H. K. RKICHART, \ice Pres 



T. B. MATTHEWS, Treas. and Cien. Mgr. 
Kl) II All., Sec'y ami Sales NJirr- 



Empire Electric Supply Co. 



Columbia Ma/.(.la Lamps 
F.lectrical Supplies and App;\ratus 

\\ holesale (Jnl\ 



1510 Preston A\e. 
Phones: Pres. 4X29-4SJ0 

Houston, Texas P. O. Box 27S 

StTvict' is our Diotto trx us 



Tr 



ry 




T, 10 Main Street 
Houston, Texas 



SHOluS AXD H()SI1':RV 

2109 Market Street 
(jalveston, Texas 



Anna Braun Green 

llcautx Pcir/or 

Permanent Waving 
a SpecialtN' 

IScndcr Hotel IJouston, J e\as 



DRINK 



Qoca-Qola 



IN BOTTLES 




KEEP 

A 
CASE 

N 

VOl'R 

IIOMI- 




e Sweetest Voice in the World 

It can't be heard on the campus. 
It can't be heard in the classroom. 
It can't be heard at a musical show. 
It can't even be heard on the Victrola. 

In fact, there is only one way for a College Man 
to hear Mother's voice, and that is — over the 
Long iJistance Telephone. 

So, if you want your pulse to tingle pleasantly: if 
you want to bnghten your spint as well as your 
intellect — let Mother greet you over the Long 
Distance Telephone once every week of your 
college lite. 



Southwestern Bell Telephone Company 




Kewaunee Laboraton 

Tzventy c^^<^ 



THE RICE INSTITUTE 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

April 29, 1926. 



Kewaunee Manufacturing Company, 
Kewaunee, 

Wisconsin, 

Dear Sirs : 

The laboratory furniture installed in the 

Rice Laboratory of Chemistry has been in use for 

more than a year. It is a pleasure for me to 

report that the equipment has proven entirely 

satisfactory in every respect. You are to be 

congratulated on the method of construction and 

the workmanship which turn out such a substantial 

and servicable product. 

Sincerely yours, 



Pterpf^ B. Weiser, 

)fessor of Chemistry, 



HB7;/JLF 



jrniture Used at Rice 

-7) Qarloads 




I:.«^*?^& 




KEWAUNEE EQUIPMENT, PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY', CHEMISTRY BUILDING, RICE INSTITUTE 

BICKLEY BROTHERS 



;ywood- 

iKEFlELD OPERA 
LAIRS AND DESKS 

;WAUNEE 

BORATORY 

RNITURE 



FACTORY REPRESENTATIVES AND DLSIRI BUTORS 
Telephone Preston ^575 

305 Foster BIdg. 719 Main Street 

Houston, Texas 



"NATIONAL" LINE 
SCHOOL FURNITURE 
AND EQUIPMENT 

DURAND STEEL 
LOCKERS 



Texas sales division of the Kewaunee Manufacturing Co., Kewaunee, JVis. 



Qlothes T>o Help Ton JVin 



HAN 1{ THI^M 1)R\ CLKANED 



More Often 



SOU'l H KND CLEANKRS S: DVl.RS 
312 TUAM AVENUE 




!■ KK1-, Send tor ^4 patcc iK-aunhilly illusmucd cuok honk 

// rite (Jorn Products Rehniiig (-0., Dcpt. 1 5 

ARCiO, ILLINOIS 



R. L. JACOBE H. JACOBE 



Jacobe Brothers Electrical Company 

Contractors tor Everything Electrical 

E.lectrical Supplies 

T014 Prairie Avenue Phone Preston 3305-1689 



W'm. K. CIrace, P?-esidfnl \Vm. J. (Irace, Sei'y-'l'rcs 

Wm. K. Grace Engineering Co. 
Electric — 'T^adio 

ELECTRIC INSTALLATIONS 

Kirhy Building Dallas, Texac 



Qo>?lpli}HC}ltS Of 



Jones Lumber Co. 



\VF, PAY RFTURN CHARGES 0\ ALL PARCEL POST 
I'\CKA(;KS AMOlNTINc; TO ONE DOLLAR AND OVER 

'-'■Jte Trait Tour Clothes If^/iitc^ 

BURKHART'S 

LAUNDRY & DYE WORKS 

HOUSTON, TF.XAS 



Southern Drug Company 

WHOLKSALK DRUGGIST 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Officers and'Uirectors 

K. R. (ilLMEK, I'rcsidcnt J. W. LESTER, Secretary 

C. !•'. CARIER, Active Vice Pres. (i. P. S'l'ON'E, Treasurer 

\V. C. BL'SCHARDT, Mgr. Sundry Dept. 

J. W. CLEVELAND J. S. RICE THOS. H. BALL DR. O. L. NORSWORTHV 

DA\1D RICE K. W. WIER A. L. CARTER WS\. M. RICE 



DISI KIHll 1N(; PLANTS GENERAL OEEICE 

Houston Palestine yo" North San Jacinto Street 

Lutkin Navasota Houston, Texas 

Brownsville Victoria 

C(,r]n.s Christi 

DESEL-BOETTCHER CO. 

(INCORPORATED) 

Hi'iihri in 

Fruity, l't-\:;cta//l(S, Piodncc, Sundry Groceries, and S[H-cialtics 

Commission Merchants "The I'ancy Fruit House 

Importers and Wholesale of Texas" 




Our Service '^R^ches its Greatest Value 
in the Selling of Jezvelry 

^'■Credit Corner ' is intended for the benefit 
and pleasure of all the people in and around this 
city. Our Jewelry presentations reach out to the 
exclusive circles as well as to people in the more 
modest walks of life and everyone is urged to use 
our credit convenience. 

You may always feel sure that Jewelry purchased 
here is invariably appropriate for the occasion 
no matter what the price may be. 

We invite you to use the experience and ad\'ice 
we are able to offer you, gained through our 
many years in the Jewelry Craft. 




Company 



ON FANNIN XT CAPITOL 




I^■^■KSTIGATE 

TH1{ USATEX MATTRKSS 

Improxed, Patented, Sanitary and Tuttless 
Mdiiu'ditiircd i)i Houston by 

USATKX MANUFACTURING CO. 

FRKDKRICK I'ARKKR, Owner 
I I 10-12-14 Xnrtli Main Street "Jz/.f/ across the /'iai/iicl" 

Ma//rt'ssi's Roiovatcd Ri^r/it" Call Preston m, 1 ;; or n 16 



('o/?ip/i/?iciits of 



T 




mes 




PRICE QUALITY 6. SERVICE 



CAPITOL AVE AT MIL-AM ST 



TOO Milam 



l-'reston ^04^ 



THE 
PUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 



MAIN AND PRKSTON 



// c puY y pcrcc/i/ on savin's s 



Call and see our ncv\' Safctx' Deposit \'ault 



BENNETT'S DRUG STORE 

Ahiin at W'chstcr 



The I'anious jolinstoii Candies, Kmlaks ami l^'ilms 
"Makers ot Thar (rood Ice Cream" 

\Ul WILL KNOW US BY THE CROWD 

/Ff arc Prcpcircd to Fmniish Parties, FjilcrtaiiiDioits, Etc. 



CoMI'I.IM KN'IS OV 

DAMON WELLS COMPANY 

l''irst Mortgages Warehouses and Business Locations 

Real E'.state Built, Leased and Financed 

Houston, Texas 

Compliments of 

DR. E. L. FOX 

X-RAY LABORATORY AND SANITARIUM 

I -^ I o McKinney Avenue 

HorSTON, TKXAS 

Phones: Office, Preston 42S2; Residence, Preston ,!2I 



HIGHEST IN (QUALITY 
LOWEST IN PRICE 



Qirs Trucks Tractors 



HOUSTON AUTHORIZED SALES AND 
SERVICE DEALERS 



BONNER MOTOR CO. 

3409 Washington Avenue 



HICKMAN-GARRETT MOTOR CO. 

Preston and Louisiana 



DAVIS MOTOR CO. 

lioo Congress Avenue 



JOHNSTON MOTOR CO 

1 1 19 JIcKinney Avenue 



DOW MOTOR CO. 

710 Wallver Avenue 



RAYMOND PEARSON CO. 

mo N. Main Street 



SELLMAN-MARTIN MOTOR CO. 

Harrisburg Boulevard 



" 


: 3 

The sort ot a store men 


jt et us help \ou -with 
your building and 


approve .... 

zAmple Stocks 

Jlmple Service 


financing problems. 


Trices that ^Jitake 




Your clothes budget 


U 


ample 

'Die best of every Ihiug men wear 




including Kuppen/ieiiiier 
Good Clothes 


SOUTH TEXAS 




LUMBER CO. 

Preston i ityq 


Leopold &: Price 


2800 McKinney Ave. 


The House of Kuppenheimer Good 
Clothes for 19 years 


Qash if you have it - Qredit if you want it 


• 

H. J. COHN 


FURNITURE CO. 


1205-07 CONGRESS Avenue 
B 3 



SOUTH TEXAS COMMERCIAL NATIONAL BANK, Houston's Bank.. f Service 




CENTRAL LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY 

( MUTUAL 1 

DKS MOINES, IOWA 

ROBERT H. PE^TZ^gtm'ra/ -^gefit 
1 106-7 SECOND NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 

FORMKRl Y THE CARTER BlILDIXG 

Telephone Preston 5193 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



riRAS' \R)DEL BARBER SHOP 

TVVEIA E CHAIRS 
M.TIRAS, Proprietor 

Phone Preslon 1962 

•JACtiiiiriiri'ig 



910-912 TF.XAS AVF.NUE 

OPPOSITE RICE HOTEL 



(yji)ip/i»n')its of 

SIM<ARS DAIRY 



(jO///p/i///cfi/s of 



MONCRIEF-LENOIR MFG. 
COMPANY 



Try the 

Houston Ice Cream Co. 

for the 

BEST ICE CREAM 

Sullivan's T^urity 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Phones: Preston 787-3780 



BLUMENTHAL BROTHERS 

Heating, Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors 

1706-1708 Congress Avenue 
Phone Preston 1871 
J. BLUMENTHAL, Prop. 



Co)iip/i»ic)its oj 

HARRY L. TAYLOR 

MAXLFACIURIXG WHOLKSALK JKWKLKR 

J15 OLEEX THF.ATRF. BUILDIXG 

norsTox, tfxas 



Sunset Coffee 

''Its F/dVor Tells the J!' hole Storv^' 

WM. D. CLEVELAND &^ SONS 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



('oDipliiiients 

Everitt-Buelow Co. 

H'liiii,)! (.'hil/iiiis F.\il/tsi:<r Bill I iirxptiisivc 

~i; Ma'wi St. Unustiiii Texas 



^Ork Products Corporation 

York, Pa. 

^()rk. 1 engineering & Supply Di\ision 

2201-2211 Texas .AvL-nue Houstdii, 'IV-xas 

DALLAS XIAVORLLAXS I lOl '.S'I'ON 

\'isir f)iir new Ini'iKling vviicru vvc do our pipe-- heiiding and vvL-ldiiig of coils and headers 
F.vn-ythiivifor Ihe Jrr Plant 



n 




c 






> 




■ Authori^d 
1 DealeA 


Star Electric & 
Engineering Co. 

Houston, Texas 
Radiola - Freed Eisemann - Atwater Kent - Crosleys 


^ 






Tiadio Sets and Tarts Electrical Contractors 

Edmund M. Dupree A. 0. Greber Neal Calvert 


EDGETT- BUR SHAM 
COMPANY 

PACKERS OF HIGH GRADE 

Canned Fruits and Vegetables 

IN TIN AND GLASS 
NEWARK, NEW YORK 

•♦•♦SSf*- 

DISTRIBUTED IN HOUSTON TERRITORY 
BY 

IHEO. KELLER COMPANY 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 
El la 









'^T/ic "Best Shop For Style - ^Aftcr ^yllT 




Plus; 'I'm It- SllU ail. I I 



IX iiorsroN 

Oil Jesting Instruments and 

High Temperature \'alves 

and Fittings 

Maintenance Engineer] xc; 
Corporation 

1S02 Conti St. Preston :;^So 

Hoi si'ox, Texas 




SiiiKl-Duty 
I\- 111 pcral lire Ret,'uhUcir 



COMPI.IMKNIS 



Gribble Stamp and Stencil Co. 



2 1 4 Fannin Street 



Sutter Water Heater Works 

specializing; in 

RTFl) - IM irSBl'RCiH and HUMPHKF^ 
WA'IKR HFATFKS, FFUMBINCi RFFAIRS 

WAIKK HKATERS RKI'AIRKD, MO\F.I) AM) C(J \ N Kfl'KI) 

l.IliERAI. CRKDlr TO R El' L 'I' A li I. K I'EOI'I.E 

Kcap \'nur Mcini-y At Iliinu- — Sup|:icirl 'I'lic l,.Kal Husim-ss Man 

PiiiiM-; IIadi.ki- 1.J40 



181; MAIN S'l-RFF'I' 



HOUSTON, TFXAS 



JOS. F. MEYER CO. 

802-812 FRANKLIN AVENUE 

'/// Unsincss over Fifty Tears nude)- one Maiuigemciif 

JOBBERS OF 

HEAVY HARDWARE 
AUTOMOTIVE EQL^IPMENT 

phones: PRESTON 3O97-3O98 



The T^e Men 



ARK ESPKCIALI.Y INVITED TO INSPECT 
OUR SHOWING OF 

T{EAD T- FOR- WEA\S Uirs 

AS MADE BY 

j:anrock-new haven, conn. 

ORIGINATORS OF THE STRAIT HANGING LOOSE 
FITTING CLOTHES NOW SO POPULAR WITH COL- 
LEGE MEN, AND FAMOUS AS TAILORS FOR STU- 
DENTS OF YALE AND OTHER EASTERN COLLEGES 
FOR THE PAST TWENTY YEARS. 

SUITS FOR COLLEGE MEN 

Sjs to $65 

READY TO WEAR OR MADE TO ORDER 



SAINT & CO. 

DOWLING AT WALKER 

Wholesale 

HAY GRAIN FEED POULTRY & EGGS 



Co /up lim e?i ts of 

TEXAS ICE & FUEL CO 



Cowp/u/ients of 

Perfecto Cleaning &: Dye Works 

Phone Iladley 1400 2819 Fannin St. 

Houston, Texas 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

CRYSTAL ICE & FUEL CO. 

I-'hone Prestcjn 430 
Jfjhn F!,. Davis, Mgr. Houston, Texas 

When Better Automobiles are Built 

S///r/f ^i// ^uild Them 

Bra/OS X'allcv Buick Company, Houston, i'exas 

IJI^-IJ -McKinney -Avenue 'Phone ■Vrcston 642O 



Miuie in .-l?nerica 




Touchdowns 
Next Fall- 



For Rice Institute will 
be made by your fa- 
vorite stars equipped 
with the nationally 
famous Ravvlings Foot- 
ball equipment devel- 
oped with the personal 
assistance of your versa- 
tile coach 
John W. Heisman 

Sold by 

Texas Sporting Goods Co. 

Made by 

Rawlings Mfg. Co.,st.Louis,Mo. 



The cover for 
this annual 
was created by 
The DAVID J. 
MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 






THE (QUALITY MARKET 

S. BlCSANYl, Proprietor 
'V/V carry the best" 

K. C. MEATS 

Booth 1 6, Citv Market Preston s220 



MORNING QLORT 



BUTTKR & KGGS 



■ARI.ST(JCRATS OF THE DINING TABLE 



INXluS'l'MKN'r SKCURITIKS 



iN()iikiKs i\\ rii;i) 



•B ON D D KI\i R T M ENT 

Fidelity Trust Co. ^/Houston 



WiTHERSPooN & Company 

INCORPORATED 

489 Fifth Avenue, New York 

Stigniving, Trinting and ^Book Binding, Fine Book Tuhlication, 
iindCjenenil 'Printing 

University and School Work, Catalogues, Year Books, Diplomas, Invitations and 
Programs. Printing, Engraving and Stamping on Vellum Parchment. 

Also, specialists in the production ot Editions De Luxe, Catalogues ot Art Collec- 
tions, Memorial Brochures. 

Highly Developed Photogravure Reproductions oi Old Master Paintings, Por- 
traits, Tapestries, xArt Objects. 

Chinese and Japanese Potteries and Porcelains reproduced in full Color. 

Expert photographers sent to any part ot the country. 

Expertising, Research Work, Data and History of" all works of Art. Authentica- 
tions by highest authorities and renowned art experts. 



COMPLETE PRINTING SERVICE (Tl^' AUTHORSHIP TO DISTRIBUTION 



CRAUSBAY-ALEXANDER CO. 




J^istribntors of 

TEXAS STAR FLOUR 



WHERE QJLTALITY IS APPRECIATED^ — 

NEW WAY or TIDAL WAVE 

^^IS DEMANDED 

THE FOLLOWING JOBBERS ARE DISTRIBUTORS OF 
NEW WAY and TIDAL WAYE FLOUR 

GORDAN-SEWALL & CO. HENKE & PILLOT S. & S. CO. 

R. M. GORDON & CO. THEO. KELLER CO. 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

True Spanish Architecture 



SPANISH HOMES 
STUCCO t5? PLASTER 




Prime Dex'elopers in 

Mcaclowhrook aiul 

Monticello 



BELL CONSTRUCTION CO. 



Hewitt Flower Shop 

Floiversjor all occasions 

— Phones — 
Day Preston 30-6 Night Preston 974S 

1 i^oH Main Street 



CdiiipHiiicnts of 

K-ier-Nickles Auto Hotel C( 

600 Louisiana Street 



CoDipliDiOils oj 



MODEL LAUNDRY 



CLEANERS e^ DVI:RS 



ii 



A plant zvith a reputation'' 



602- 1 2 Prairie A\'eniie 
HOUS'I'ON, TEXAS 



The Kind of "Smart Clothes'' 
Preferred by College Men! 




Where the styling is al- 
ways right up to the min- 
ute — and wliere the finest 
of woolens and tailoring is 
assured. 

— ^VN^e've been satisfying 
the Men of Rice for years, 
in every respect, with 

— Fashion Park Suits 

— Knox Hats 

— Manhattan Shirts 

— "Mansco" Union 
Suits 



Saiieidmil 

812-14 MAIN 



— and now — 

Nettleton Shoes for 

Men of Discrimination 



Nothing But a Good Title Can be 
Guaranteed by 

Houston Title Guaranty Co. 

Title Guaranty Building 2nd Floor 

Prairie Avenue at Main Street 

Same Offices we have occupied Jor past ten years 



THE 

UNION NATIONAL 
BANK 



OV H () r S I- ( ) \ , i- K X A s 



^^^<- 



CAI'ITAI,. SURPLUS AM) U\ I )l \ I |)i;i i I'Ki il-l'I'S 

(i\i:k iwo .Mil, I. Kin dollars 



SHE ^AVS IF You'ffE Too 7I NNWe^e , Does SHE 6£r 
eaSY XOT^K^TO HER AND I THAT OO" STvFFj 

TERM THEME THAN YOU Do )Il|^^^^ HtJ^^YH 

J\-,TO HELL / 




HOUSTON SHOE HOSPITAL 

JOHN L. MAIDA, Proprietor 

Saves Tour Sole While You Wait 



Phone Preston 2301 




515 Travis Street 


EDWARD S. BOYNES 
RUSSELL SCOTT 
GAINER B.JONES 


L. D. BROWN 
E. r GIBBONS 


J. T. SCOTT, JR. 

PAT N. FAHEY 

FRANK G. DYER 


Boyles, 


Brown 

jTawyers 


& Scott 



First National Bank Building 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 



R. \V. HoRLocK, President 



Carl K. Eckhardt, Secretary 



SOUTH END WEST END 

ICE COMPANY 



Hadley 2290 



Taylor 1775 



IF YOU WANT A WINNER 
BUY A 

NASH 

or 

AJAX 

JACK NEAL MOTOR CO. 

1302 LAMAR 



Thev sat on the porch at midnight 
Their lips were tightly pressed; 
The old man gave the signal 
The bulldog did the rest. 




»^^^3£IMZZ MYER&CO OWNERS^ 

405 Main Scanlan Bldg. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Young '^ynten s Qlothes 

TAILORED WITH PLENTY OF DASH AND PEP AND 

PRICED FOR LESS 
T he House of Kuppenheimer Good Qlothes 



Qompliments of 



PLAZA HOTEL 



TEMPLE LUMBER CO, 



^^Tou zy>fCust 'Be 'Pleased" 



W. S. BLACK, Manager C. A. DAVIS, Manager 

Main Yard Heights Yard 

3400 Polk Avenue Preston 3682 425 W. 18th Street Taylor ' 



TEXAS HOTEL SUPPLY CO, 

"^g Serve and Satisfy" 

1 1 1 1 Franklin Avenue 
Houston, Texas 




Kind Lady: You wicked boy! Why did 
you cut that poor little worm in two? 

Wicked Boy: Aw, lady, it looked so 
lonesome! 



Preston 9 109 Main Street 





HUGHES TOOL COMPANY 



3,00 HUGHES STREET 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



The ^ and S Florists 

QUALITY SERVICE 

MEMBERS florists' TELEGRAPH DELIVERY 

^''Say it with Flowers'' 

PHONE PRESTON 5 I 94 IIII TRAVIS STREET 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Compliments of 




H{0USTON^ 



THREE STORES 

POST-DISPATCH BUILDING 

51 1 MAIN ST. 807 MAIN ST. 



Dixon Packing Co. 



INCORPORATED 



108-10 MILAM STREET 



Compliments of 

BEARD & STONE ELECTRIC CO., Inc. 

HOUSTON WACO NEW ORLEANS 

Largest Automotive Electrical House in the South 



Qof?ipli/ne?its of 

Kuhn Paint and Varnish Works 



A. J. BiNz, President L. F. Philo, Assistant General Mgr.' 

J. J. Settegast, Jr., General Manager H. G. Gilmore, Assistant Sec'y-Treas. 



TEL-ELECTRIC COMPANY 



Agents 
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC & MFG. CO. 

WHOLESALE ELECTRICAL, TELEPHONE 
AND RADIO SUPPLIES 



602-604-PRESTON Avenue Houston, Texas 



Qj/np/iments of 

Terry Packing Company 

I I 2 Milam Street 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 



Lea, Radford &: Robinson 

GENERAL INSURANCE 

602 Second National Bank Building Houston, Texas 

Phones: Preston 780-2278 



MILEAGE 



SAFETY • ECONOMY • SERVICE 

<'<'The "Dickson JF/ieef 

Chilled Car and 
Engine Wheels 

For every service 

Steam and Street Railways, 

Plantation, Mine and 

Saw Mill. 

Oldest, Largest and Most Modern Car 
Wheel Plant in the Southwest 

Daily capacity 
400 wheels 

DICKSON CAR WHEEL CO. 




Houston, Texas 



For information concerning 

FARM IMPLEMENTS and 
CONTRACTOR'S MACHINERY 

SEE US 

South Texas Implement & Machinery Co. 

Show Rooms 601-7 Preston Avenue 
Office and Warehouse: Wood and North San Jacinto Sts. 




ge 0^ College inn 

It is more than an eating place. It is a part ot your college days. 



We are proud ot the tact that we print 

The Thresher 



Our plant is thoroughly equipped 
for complete publication, news- 
paper service, linotyping and 
stereotyping 



Western Newspaper Union 

J. A. F^u(l.son, Rtsiilent Manager 
1-512 Walker Avenue Houston 



Among the many things for which this 

great jewelry store is famous, by no 

means the least in importance is 

the creation of the official 

ring of the 

T^WE gRADUATE 



Jewels, T'latinum and Qold J eivelry , 

Watches, Silver, (Crystal, Qhina 

and iArt Wares 



L. LECHENGER, Jeweler 

POST-DISPATCH BUILDING 



PRESTON 0103 




PARKE ENGRAVING COMPANY 



6'ngmvcr.f for igzO Qampanile and Qosmos 



8151^ Capito! Avenue 



Preston 2399 



HOUSTON, TEXAS 



RICE AND COLES 

Qoal 



BEST OF ALL GRADES 



Hadley 9944-1077 



Houston Car Wheel and 
5^ Machine Company 

Houston, Texas 

s- Manufacturers of — 

Gray Iron Castings 

Car IVheels Patterns 

mmC • ffr^=- Machine Works and Forging 




''Only the Best" 

This accurately describes 
every article in our com- 
plete line of — 

Drugs, Toilet Accessories 

Stationery, Candies and 

Periodicals 



See Our T^ce yewelry 

Henrich's Pharmacy 

"SERVICE" 

Eagle and Fannin Streets 
PHONE HADLEY 44 



HARRY S. CAMERON, 
Vice-President & General Manager 



EDMOND L. LOREHN, 
Secretary-Treasu rer 



CAMERON 
IRONWORKS 



Manufacturers of 

OIL WELL 
SPECIALTIES 

711 Milby Street Preston 285 
Houston, Texas 



^For 1926 — 

The Rein Company is producing: 

The Rice Campanile 

Rice Institute, Houston 

The Sou zv ester 

Southwestern University, Georgetown 

Tfie Alcalde 

Sam Houston State Teachers College, Huntsville 

The Cosmos 

Central High School, Houston 

The Pennant 

Heights High School, Houston 

The Buffalo 

Harrishurg High School, Harrishurg 

The Gusher 

Hunihle High .School, Humble 

The Den-Tex 

Texas Dental College, Houston 

The Bull Dog 

Kden High Scho<,l, Ivlen 
ASK I'OR SUGGESTIONS 

THE REIN COMPANY 

HOl;si(J.\, IKXAS